My Sunday Reading

My Sunday Reading

Brad Kay
Brad Kay

February 21st, 2011, 10:05 am #1

Poking around on the Net, found some articles VERY likely to interest readers of this Forum. Enjoy!

-Brad K


*****************************************

North Tonawanda, NY Evening News
Tuesday, Sept. 6, 1938

DIAL DIVERSION FOR HOURS AT HOME

Goodman Swingsters to Play Memorial To Bix Beiderbecke, Famous Trumpeter

Benny Goodman and his swingsters will play a memorial to the late Bix Beiderbecke, one of music's greatest "hot" trumpeters during their Caravan broadcast over a coast-to-coast CBS network from Chicago, tonight at 9:30.

Jess Stacey will play Beiderbecke's "In A Mist" as a special tribute to the great musician's musician. Although it is not generally known, Goodman played in the same bands with Beiderbecke during their early days in Chicago. Other features of the broadcast will be Chicago and Margie by the band; the quartets own arrangement of Shine and Martha Tiltons swing singing of You Go To My Head.

******************************************

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Sunday, April 21, 1935, p. C7

WHITEMAN AND HIS INFLUENCE
By John Hammond

PAUL WHITEMAN has been posing for so long as the champion and prophet of American jazz that it is time somebody up and pulled off the whiskers. The simple fact is that Mr. Whiteman, quite unwittingly, has stifled not only American popular music but musicians as well.

Like so many of his confreres among band-leaders, Whiteman lacks sufficient musical foundation for the qualities of discrimination, originality or taste. He is primarily a showman with an amazing flare for publicity which has surpassed the efforts of all his rivals. The only quality that Whiteman is chiefly responsible for in modern hjazz is pretension. To him can be attributed the bombast of arrangers like Ferdie Grofe, Gershwin in his symphonic moments and the countless others whom the so-called dean of modern music has sponsored. Simplicity is not to be found in his musical language.

But strangely, the influence of Whiteman was not such a bad one in the days of his Aeolian Hall concerts as it became in later periods, when he decided to attach the hot virtuosi to his band. At a time in the twenties Bix Beiderbecke, Joe Venuti, Eddie Lang, Frank Trumbauer and the Dorseys could all be found in his band. Instead of these original musicians stimulating the band, the latter irrevocably tainted the soloists. Improvisation cannot take place when there is no inspiration. Even with this new blood Whiteman continued with his old showmanship, and let comedians who played instruments only as a sideline sit right next to the best of musicians and ruin whatever inventiveness the latter possessed.

There are very few good musicians who have played in Whiteman bands and benefitted by the experience. The leader will take expert drummers, bassists and instrumental soloists, instruct them to change their style lest it be too advanced for his public. At this very moment the finest of all trombone players, Jack Teagarden, drawn into the Whiteman band by a large salary, and signed to a long-term contract, is on the way to a musical eclipse. For Jack has become just another entertainer, has been featured as a stooge in one song, and plays one solo chorus each evening if luck is with him. And as time goes on he finds it more and more difficult to play as we know he can.

Since Bix's departure, Whiteman has made no records with even a gleam of originality. Once in a while he puts out a concert record such as Serenade for a Wealthy Widow, in which a simple, relatively unpretentious tune is dolled up in fancy meaningless array, to pose as new music. The band is unwieldy not only from size, but in its ragged rhythm section, comprising two pianos, accordion (!), banjo, bass and tympani. Consequently, the master's music is not the best, even for dancing.

****************************************************

Niagara Falls Gazette
Wed. Jan. 14, 1957 p. 25

LIFE IS NEVER BORING FOR CHAMPION OF JAZZ

By Hal Boyle

NEW YORK (AP) - All the kings of what Westbrook Pegler so aptly called the era of wonderful nonsense are dead, dignified, or retired except one.

At the edge of 67, Paul Whiteman, the original "King of Jazz," looks 20 years younger, still boils over with the tempestuous energy that made the 1920's one of history's most memorable decades.

Paul, who for a time at the old Hippodrome conducted his band atop a white horse (can Arturo Toscanini match this claim?), has put together a golden anniversary record album to celebrate his 50 years in music.

The album has taken many an aging jazz lover back to the springtime of his life when Bix Beiderbecke, who died young, blew a trumpet as no man has since, and a young unknown called Bing Crosby was one of three "Rhythm Boys" and didn't have a racehorse to his name.

The rest of this piece is a monologue of memories and summaries by "Pops" Whiteman, who keeps the 1920's wrapped in his soul but remains as fresh as tomorrow.

CALLED RAGTIME

"They didn't call it jazz when I started. They called it ragtime. I began on the viola in the Denver Symphony Orchestra in 1906 when I was 16. By 1919 I had my own orchestra and came east.

"I had 9 pieces and I built the band up to 46, counting the singers. Those were the years! In 1925 I grossed $680,000 before taxes, thank the Lord!

"They talk about the $125,000 party that a Texas oil man just threw. Around 1922 our band played for a party for Clarence MacKay on Long Island that cost $465,000. He only had about 200 invited guests, but he built a model of the Versailles Gardens for the brawl. There were two acres of cut flowers and an orangerie of 50 live trees shipped up from Florida just for that one night. I got a $10,000 tip myself- not unusual in those days. When they threw a party then, they weren't fooling!

"I remember a party in Philadelphia where they turned a hotel ballroom into a jungle full of real monkeys, cockatoos and guests. At 3 o'clock in the morning, they blew 15 tons of rose petals over the dancers.

"Yes, I threw the first big concert by a jazz band. We introduced George Gershwin's 'Rhapsody in Blue.' I also had the first jazz band in the Ziegfeld Follies, and took the first American jazz band to Europe. They were high years.

"What killed the big bands? Well, I quit myself. But what destroyed most of them was the bandleaders got fat-headed. Over a period of 10 years they taught the people to listen to singers instead of dancing.

"Guy Lombardo didn't. That's why he's still big. The others made the singers bigger than their bands.

BING IS TOPS

"The greatest entertainer I ever knew? Bing Crosby, as of now. But Sinatra will be another Crosby. Sinatra is fabulously generous. Do you know that guy's given away 26 Cadillacs to people he likes?

"I wouldn't write off this Elvis Presley too fast either. That guy is a symbol to a lot of kids with troubles but he's got something in his neck, too, and it comes out.

"Talent is God-given, although a lot of performers don't bother to give God equal billing. A thousand guys can practice equally hard but only one has the spark.

"What destroys many performers is that their head gets so big it gets in their own way. And as their head gets bigger, their heart gets smaller.

"That never happened to Bing. You notice he never has a bad word to say about anybody except himself. Perry Como is the same way.

STILL KEEPS BUSY

"What did Bix Beiderbecke have? Every time he lifted that trumpet, he blew it different from the time before.

"Yes, I lived well. I've hired trains to go on a party. Started for Alaska once on a party, but the train never did get there.

"I still do all right. I have me a farm in New Jersey. I call it 'Agony Acres on Swinging Jaw Road,' complete with mortgage.

"I keep busy in radio and television. I always liked sports cars, and I still have a $5600 Porsche. In 1953 I drove 90,000 miles mostly commuting between home and shows.

"My life has been a mixing of two Jackie Gleason characters the poor soul and the loud mouth. My head has been swelled and deflated so often that now it stays in a groove. But I've never been mean to anybody.

"In this world you are either under-secure or under-secure until, if you're lucky, you find the right groove.

"Theres nothing left that I particularly want to do. But I can tell you one thing I don't feel bored!"

**************************************************************
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 21st, 2011, 1:47 pm #2


Except for the Benny Goodman Caravan piece, which I quoted in my "Bix and Benny" article  http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/Article ... ixAndBenny , all the others are new and quite significant.

I am not surprised that John Hammond maligns -savagely- Paul Whiteman. It happens in every field of human endeavor. Opinions/assertions are tainted by agendas. Even in science - presumably scientists are objective and let the data dictate the conclusions. Not really. As a practicing scientist/chemistry researcher for almost 50  years, I have seen brilliant chemists come up with  assertions based, not on the demands of the observations, but on their desires/philosophies/preconceived notions.

I quote John Hammond: <em>"Since Bix's departure, Whiteman has made no records with even a gleam of originality." </em>A falsehood. Just listen to Lennie Hayton's arrangements in 1929 after Bix had left: "Nobody's Sweetheart." "If I Had A Talking Picture of You," "Should I?"

http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/rama/COLW149123.ram<a href="http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/whitema ... c.ram"></a>  except for a bit of a harsh sound, a highly Bixian Secrest; excellent jazz solos by Friedman and Tram

http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/ramb/ColW149150-4.ram Friedman, Secrest and Eddie and Joe

http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/Whiteman/shouldi.ram  As Rayno tells us, stunning duet by Tram and Hazlett

And what about William Grant Still's arrangement of "After You've Gone"?

Albert

PS Brad, thanks for your positive reaction to my posting on Jack Purvis. Indeed, the newspaper articles  provide a bit of a preview/explanation of Jack's astonishing career/life.

 
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alex revell
alex revell

February 21st, 2011, 3:01 pm #3

Poking around on the Net, found some articles VERY likely to interest readers of this Forum. Enjoy!

-Brad K


*****************************************

North Tonawanda, NY Evening News
Tuesday, Sept. 6, 1938

DIAL DIVERSION FOR HOURS AT HOME

Goodman Swingsters to Play Memorial To Bix Beiderbecke, Famous Trumpeter

Benny Goodman and his swingsters will play a memorial to the late Bix Beiderbecke, one of music's greatest "hot" trumpeters during their Caravan broadcast over a coast-to-coast CBS network from Chicago, tonight at 9:30.

Jess Stacey will play Beiderbecke's "In A Mist" as a special tribute to the great musician's musician. Although it is not generally known, Goodman played in the same bands with Beiderbecke during their early days in Chicago. Other features of the broadcast will be Chicago and Margie by the band; the quartets own arrangement of Shine and Martha Tiltons swing singing of You Go To My Head.

******************************************

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Sunday, April 21, 1935, p. C7

WHITEMAN AND HIS INFLUENCE
By John Hammond

PAUL WHITEMAN has been posing for so long as the champion and prophet of American jazz that it is time somebody up and pulled off the whiskers. The simple fact is that Mr. Whiteman, quite unwittingly, has stifled not only American popular music but musicians as well.

Like so many of his confreres among band-leaders, Whiteman lacks sufficient musical foundation for the qualities of discrimination, originality or taste. He is primarily a showman with an amazing flare for publicity which has surpassed the efforts of all his rivals. The only quality that Whiteman is chiefly responsible for in modern hjazz is pretension. To him can be attributed the bombast of arrangers like Ferdie Grofe, Gershwin in his symphonic moments and the countless others whom the so-called dean of modern music has sponsored. Simplicity is not to be found in his musical language.

But strangely, the influence of Whiteman was not such a bad one in the days of his Aeolian Hall concerts as it became in later periods, when he decided to attach the hot virtuosi to his band. At a time in the twenties Bix Beiderbecke, Joe Venuti, Eddie Lang, Frank Trumbauer and the Dorseys could all be found in his band. Instead of these original musicians stimulating the band, the latter irrevocably tainted the soloists. Improvisation cannot take place when there is no inspiration. Even with this new blood Whiteman continued with his old showmanship, and let comedians who played instruments only as a sideline sit right next to the best of musicians and ruin whatever inventiveness the latter possessed.

There are very few good musicians who have played in Whiteman bands and benefitted by the experience. The leader will take expert drummers, bassists and instrumental soloists, instruct them to change their style lest it be too advanced for his public. At this very moment the finest of all trombone players, Jack Teagarden, drawn into the Whiteman band by a large salary, and signed to a long-term contract, is on the way to a musical eclipse. For Jack has become just another entertainer, has been featured as a stooge in one song, and plays one solo chorus each evening if luck is with him. And as time goes on he finds it more and more difficult to play as we know he can.

Since Bix's departure, Whiteman has made no records with even a gleam of originality. Once in a while he puts out a concert record such as Serenade for a Wealthy Widow, in which a simple, relatively unpretentious tune is dolled up in fancy meaningless array, to pose as new music. The band is unwieldy not only from size, but in its ragged rhythm section, comprising two pianos, accordion (!), banjo, bass and tympani. Consequently, the master's music is not the best, even for dancing.

****************************************************

Niagara Falls Gazette
Wed. Jan. 14, 1957 p. 25

LIFE IS NEVER BORING FOR CHAMPION OF JAZZ

By Hal Boyle

NEW YORK (AP) - All the kings of what Westbrook Pegler so aptly called the era of wonderful nonsense are dead, dignified, or retired except one.

At the edge of 67, Paul Whiteman, the original "King of Jazz," looks 20 years younger, still boils over with the tempestuous energy that made the 1920's one of history's most memorable decades.

Paul, who for a time at the old Hippodrome conducted his band atop a white horse (can Arturo Toscanini match this claim?), has put together a golden anniversary record album to celebrate his 50 years in music.

The album has taken many an aging jazz lover back to the springtime of his life when Bix Beiderbecke, who died young, blew a trumpet as no man has since, and a young unknown called Bing Crosby was one of three "Rhythm Boys" and didn't have a racehorse to his name.

The rest of this piece is a monologue of memories and summaries by "Pops" Whiteman, who keeps the 1920's wrapped in his soul but remains as fresh as tomorrow.

CALLED RAGTIME

"They didn't call it jazz when I started. They called it ragtime. I began on the viola in the Denver Symphony Orchestra in 1906 when I was 16. By 1919 I had my own orchestra and came east.

"I had 9 pieces and I built the band up to 46, counting the singers. Those were the years! In 1925 I grossed $680,000 before taxes, thank the Lord!

"They talk about the $125,000 party that a Texas oil man just threw. Around 1922 our band played for a party for Clarence MacKay on Long Island that cost $465,000. He only had about 200 invited guests, but he built a model of the Versailles Gardens for the brawl. There were two acres of cut flowers and an orangerie of 50 live trees shipped up from Florida just for that one night. I got a $10,000 tip myself- not unusual in those days. When they threw a party then, they weren't fooling!

"I remember a party in Philadelphia where they turned a hotel ballroom into a jungle full of real monkeys, cockatoos and guests. At 3 o'clock in the morning, they blew 15 tons of rose petals over the dancers.

"Yes, I threw the first big concert by a jazz band. We introduced George Gershwin's 'Rhapsody in Blue.' I also had the first jazz band in the Ziegfeld Follies, and took the first American jazz band to Europe. They were high years.

"What killed the big bands? Well, I quit myself. But what destroyed most of them was the bandleaders got fat-headed. Over a period of 10 years they taught the people to listen to singers instead of dancing.

"Guy Lombardo didn't. That's why he's still big. The others made the singers bigger than their bands.

BING IS TOPS

"The greatest entertainer I ever knew? Bing Crosby, as of now. But Sinatra will be another Crosby. Sinatra is fabulously generous. Do you know that guy's given away 26 Cadillacs to people he likes?

"I wouldn't write off this Elvis Presley too fast either. That guy is a symbol to a lot of kids with troubles but he's got something in his neck, too, and it comes out.

"Talent is God-given, although a lot of performers don't bother to give God equal billing. A thousand guys can practice equally hard but only one has the spark.

"What destroys many performers is that their head gets so big it gets in their own way. And as their head gets bigger, their heart gets smaller.

"That never happened to Bing. You notice he never has a bad word to say about anybody except himself. Perry Como is the same way.

STILL KEEPS BUSY

"What did Bix Beiderbecke have? Every time he lifted that trumpet, he blew it different from the time before.

"Yes, I lived well. I've hired trains to go on a party. Started for Alaska once on a party, but the train never did get there.

"I still do all right. I have me a farm in New Jersey. I call it 'Agony Acres on Swinging Jaw Road,' complete with mortgage.

"I keep busy in radio and television. I always liked sports cars, and I still have a $5600 Porsche. In 1953 I drove 90,000 miles mostly commuting between home and shows.

"My life has been a mixing of two Jackie Gleason characters the poor soul and the loud mouth. My head has been swelled and deflated so often that now it stays in a groove. But I've never been mean to anybody.

"In this world you are either under-secure or under-secure until, if you're lucky, you find the right groove.

"Theres nothing left that I particularly want to do. But I can tell you one thing I don't feel bored!"

**************************************************************
I must say that, for me - with one or two small reservations - John Hammond hits it right on the head re.Whiteman. I don't fully agree, if at all, with the 'tainted' solos. What has always astounded me, and still does, is how Bix et al managed to play such good ones, not being surrounded by very much in the way of inspiration.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 21st, 2011, 4:34 pm #4


On the occasion of Paul Whiteman's 114th birthday, see

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1080433707

 I quoted part of what Norman Gentieu wrote in the introduction to Don Rayno's monumental work on Whiteman.

<em>"It is an irony of fate that much of the literature of jazz has been written by opinionated dilettantes in music and purblind ideologues. Thanks to such self-appointed arbiters of taste, historical and musical verities have been trashed as irrelevant impediments to their reckless rhetoric, and nowhere has this been more dismayingly demonstrated than in the case of Paul Whiteman -who sinned unforgivingly in being proclaimed by the public as the King of Jazz.
Over the years, Whiteman has attracted the attention of blinkered "critics" the way a respectable cat attracts fleas. But, whereas the fleas are doing what comes naturally and without malice aforethought, the gurus of jazzology, rankling with envy of Whiteman's brilliant career, have resorted to mean-spirited disinformation. Rather than attempting to understand and explicate the reasons for Whiteman's unprecedented success, they have opted to put him down with knee-jerk ad hominem attacks, junk aesthetics, and snide opinions, all gussied up in politically correct pieties."</em>

After the quote, I  wrote,<em> "I wish I had written that." </em>I still do.

William Youngren also agreed with the late Norman Gentieu. In his foreword to Rayno's tome, Youngren wrote,

<em>"I agree wholeheartedly with everything Mr. Gentieu has written, since my experience of jazz historians and critics, in their relation to Paul Whiteman and his music, has, until recently anyhow, been identical to his: these writers have simply failed to use their ears. Moreover, they have not bothered to investigate Whiteman's actual dealings with jazz musicians in the 1920s, and their attitudes towward him."</em>

Well said. Some jazz historians and critics, as I stated in my previous posting, present views not based on facts and observation, but on their biases and prejudices. John Hammond was politically correct before the phrase existed. Hence his opinion of Whiteman's music.

Albert
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Alex Revell
Alex Revell

February 21st, 2011, 4:52 pm #5

Well, I've read some purple prose in my time, but I think Mr Gentieu just about takes the biscuit! It figures, in a way.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 21st, 2011, 4:57 pm #6

On the occasion of Paul Whiteman's 114th birthday, see

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1080433707

 I quoted part of what Norman Gentieu wrote in the introduction to Don Rayno's monumental work on Whiteman.

<em>"It is an irony of fate that much of the literature of jazz has been written by opinionated dilettantes in music and purblind ideologues. Thanks to such self-appointed arbiters of taste, historical and musical verities have been trashed as irrelevant impediments to their reckless rhetoric, and nowhere has this been more dismayingly demonstrated than in the case of Paul Whiteman -who sinned unforgivingly in being proclaimed by the public as the King of Jazz.
Over the years, Whiteman has attracted the attention of blinkered "critics" the way a respectable cat attracts fleas. But, whereas the fleas are doing what comes naturally and without malice aforethought, the gurus of jazzology, rankling with envy of Whiteman's brilliant career, have resorted to mean-spirited disinformation. Rather than attempting to understand and explicate the reasons for Whiteman's unprecedented success, they have opted to put him down with knee-jerk ad hominem attacks, junk aesthetics, and snide opinions, all gussied up in politically correct pieties."</em>

After the quote, I  wrote,<em> "I wish I had written that." </em>I still do.

William Youngren also agreed with the late Norman Gentieu. In his foreword to Rayno's tome, Youngren wrote,

<em>"I agree wholeheartedly with everything Mr. Gentieu has written, since my experience of jazz historians and critics, in their relation to Paul Whiteman and his music, has, until recently anyhow, been identical to his: these writers have simply failed to use their ears. Moreover, they have not bothered to investigate Whiteman's actual dealings with jazz musicians in the 1920s, and their attitudes towward him."</em>

Well said. Some jazz historians and critics, as I stated in my previous posting, present views not based on facts and observation, but on their biases and prejudices. John Hammond was politically correct before the phrase existed. Hence his opinion of Whiteman's music.

Albert
In my piece about Whiteman for the doctorjazz series on World War I Registation cards, I quoted another negative assertion by Hammond. "<em>he (Whiteman) had the world's worst rhythm section, and horrible, screeching strings, playing the most appalling arrangements you could conceive of." </em>[Talk about "purple prose"!!!]That is another falsehood on the part of Hammond. Worst rhythm section? What about banjoist Mike Pingitore? And pianists such as Roy Bargy and Lennie Hayton?

And let me quote Vince Giordano from his posting in http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1243389728

<em>"Paul Whiteman had musicians in his band who were able to play written scores and improvise jazz solos.
In listening to the Whiteman sides for many years here are some of my thoughts. In the early [ pre Bix days], Whiteman used reed players like: Gus Mueller and Ross Gorman who would play improvised hot solos over the ensemble playing [ Wang Wang Blues, Way Down Yonder In New Orleans and other titles]. Trombonists Buster Johnson, Sammy Lewis, and Roy Maxon had many passages of improvised solo work on those early Whiteman sides, too.
My favorite example of jazz in the early days of Paul Whiteman is "I'll Build a Stairway To Paradise" where Tommy Gott [tpt] plays a two chorus solo of blues on Sept 1, 1922. This solo is right up there with other hot trumpet players of those days. Please check it out. This record came out 1 year before the classic King Oliver sides of 1923.
The 1924 concert had his musicians playing both the written scores and improvised jazz solo passages as they did on their recordings.
Whiteman did not set out to be a jazz band. His hot players that he used in all periods of the Whiteman band provided improvised jazz solos to give real jazz elements to his band."</em>


Albert


<em></em> 
Last edited by ahaim on February 21st, 2011, 10:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 21st, 2011, 5:12 pm #7


Just take a look at some of Whiteman's arrangers: Bill Challis, Roy Bargy, Lennie Hayton, Tom Satterfield, Matty Malneck, Ferde Grofe. Not to Hammond's taste, perhaps, but appalling?

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 21st, 2011, 6:28 pm #8

In my piece about Whiteman for the doctorjazz series on World War I Registation cards, I quoted another negative assertion by Hammond. "<em>he (Whiteman) had the world's worst rhythm section, and horrible, screeching strings, playing the most appalling arrangements you could conceive of." </em>[Talk about "purple prose"!!!]That is another falsehood on the part of Hammond. Worst rhythm section? What about banjoist Mike Pingitore? And pianists such as Roy Bargy and Lennie Hayton?

And let me quote Vince Giordano from his posting in http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1243389728

<em>"Paul Whiteman had musicians in his band who were able to play written scores and improvise jazz solos.
In listening to the Whiteman sides for many years here are some of my thoughts. In the early [ pre Bix days], Whiteman used reed players like: Gus Mueller and Ross Gorman who would play improvised hot solos over the ensemble playing [ Wang Wang Blues, Way Down Yonder In New Orleans and other titles]. Trombonists Buster Johnson, Sammy Lewis, and Roy Maxon had many passages of improvised solo work on those early Whiteman sides, too.
My favorite example of jazz in the early days of Paul Whiteman is "I'll Build a Stairway To Paradise" where Tommy Gott [tpt] plays a two chorus solo of blues on Sept 1, 1922. This solo is right up there with other hot trumpet players of those days. Please check it out. This record came out 1 year before the classic King Oliver sides of 1923.
The 1924 concert had his musicians playing both the written scores and improvised jazz solo passages as they did on their recordings.
Whiteman did not set out to be a jazz band. His hot players that he used in all periods of the Whiteman band provided improvised jazz solos to give real jazz elements to his band."</em>


Albert


<em></em> 
Lots of arrangements by Van Eps listed in the Whiteman's Williams College website.

http://archives.williams.edu/pwc/vaneps.php

One listing caught my attention in particular:
<strong>Davenport Blues   PWC# 0468, by Beiderbecke</strong>
Did Whiteman ever play Davenport Blues?

Which of the Van Eps brothers was the arranger for Whiteman?

Albert

 
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David Weiner
David Weiner

February 22nd, 2011, 6:13 pm #9

Just take a look at some of Whiteman's arrangers: Bill Challis, Roy Bargy, Lennie Hayton, Tom Satterfield, Matty Malneck, Ferde Grofe. Not to Hammond's taste, perhaps, but appalling?

Albert
To be fair to Hammond, I assume he is talking about the early to mid-30s Whiteman band he likely heard live; and that band did have its'share of stuffy, fussy, out-of-date charts that sounded behind the times in the Swing Era.

Dave Weiner
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