My Mammy by Paul Whiteman: Two out of twenty-one!!

My Mammy by Paul Whiteman: Two out of twenty-one!!

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 20th, 2012, 3:30 pm #1

Last edited by ahaim on June 20th, 2012, 3:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 20th, 2012, 3:36 pm #2

Vince  writes, 
<em>Irving Berlin is given credit on the Victor label because Beautiful Faces [the 2nd tune] is Berlin's</em>

Thanks Vince, that solves the problem I created!!

Albert


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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 20th, 2012, 4:26 pm #3


<span class="pageTitle">https://jscholarship.library.jhu.edu/ha ... 74.2/12134</span>

<span class="pageTitle">Broadway Brevities of 1920 </span>
Winter Garden Theatre, (9/29/1920 - 12/18/1920) <div class="eightpoint"><table cellspacing="2" cellpadding="2"><tr><td align="left">Preview:</td><td align="left"></td><td> </td><td align="left">Total Previews:</td><td align="left"></td></tr><tr><td align="left">Opening:</td><td align="left">Sep 29, 1920</td><td> </td><td align="left"> </td><td align="left"> </td></tr><tr><td align="left">Closing:</td><td align="left">Dec 18, 1920</td><td> </td><td align="left">Total Performances:</td><td align="left">105</td></tr></table></div>
Eddie Cantor was one of the performers.
Get a load of the songs in the production.


<table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td width="36"><img alt="Music1.gif" src="http://www.ibdb.com/images/Music1.gif" width="35" height="60"></td><td width="100%">Broadway Brevities of 1920 (09/29/1920 - 12/18/1920)
<span class="credits">music by Archie Gottler; lyrics by Blair Treynor
<em>(Unless otherwise noted)</em>
 
</span> </td><td align="right"></td></tr></table><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5" width="100%"><tr><th colspan="3">ACT 1</th></tr><tr><th>Song List</th><th> </th><th>Sung By</th></tr><tr><td>The Usual Opening Chorus <em></em></td><td> </td><td>Entire Ensemble</td></tr><tr><td>I Love to Dance <em></em></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>(I'm Going to) Love, Honor, and O'Baby <em></em></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>That Means Home to Me <em></em></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Spanish Love <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by George Gershwin; lyrics by Irving Caesar)</span></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>(We've Got) The Stage Door Blues <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby; lyrics by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby)</span></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>The Moon Shines on the Moonshine <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by Robert Hood Bowers; lyrics by Francis DeWitt)</span></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>I Want to Know Where Tosti Went <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by Chris Smith; lyrics by Chris Smith)</span></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>I Makes Mine Myself <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by Robert Hood Bowers; lyrics by Francis DeWitt)</span></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Somebody (Else, Not Me) (from ZIEGFELD FOLLIES OF 1919) <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by James Hanley; lyrics by Ballard MacDonald)</span></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Get Up <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by Robert Hood Bowers; lyrics by Robert Hood Bowers)</span></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Wonderful <em></em></td><td> </td><td>Girls</td></tr><tr><td>Love Me While the Snow Flakes Fall <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by George Gershwin; lyrics by Arthur Jackson)</span></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><th colspan="3">ACT 2</th></tr><tr><th>Song List</th><th> </th><th>Sung By</th></tr><tr><td>A Housetop of Our Own <em></em></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Won't You Let Me Take a Picture of You? <em></em></td><td> </td><td>Kodak Girls</td></tr><tr><td>Beautiful Faces Need Beautiful Clothes <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by Irving Berlin; lyrics by Irving Berlin)</span></td><td> </td><td>Girls</td></tr><tr><td>I'm a Dancing Fool <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by George Gershwin; lyrics by Arthur Jackson)</span></td><td> </td><td>Girls</td></tr><tr><td>Drigo's Polka <em></em></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Stolen Sweets <em></em></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Lu-Lu <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by George Gershwin; lyrics by Arthur Jackson)</span></td><td> </td><td>Girls</td></tr><tr><td>I Wish That I'd Been Born in Borneo <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by Walter Donaldson; lyrics by Grant Clarke)</span></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Palesteena (Lena is the Queen of Palesteena) <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by Con Conrad and Russell J. Robinson; lyrics by Con Conrad and Russell J. Robinson)</span></td><td> </td><td></td></tr><tr><td>Margie <em></em>
<span class="prod_song_credits">(music by Con Conrad and Russell J. Robinson; lyrics by Benny Davis)</span></td></tr></table>
Albert
Last edited by ahaim on June 20th, 2012, 4:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Alan Matheson
Alan Matheson

June 21st, 2012, 12:50 am #4

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Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

June 21st, 2012, 12:48 pm #5

Perhaps the failed takes were not so much musician errors as problems in the recording process--equipment--speed miscalibrations, for example--or problems with the wax. It <em>was</em> early days, and I remember that a warped record or dragging turntable or even tape speed problems were much more noticeable on music than voice parts.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 21st, 2012, 1:47 pm #6


From http://www.stokowski.org/1921-1924%20Tc ... ustics.htm
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;">Stokowski's first issued Tchaikovsky recording was of the third movement (Marche scherzo) of Tchaikovsky Symphony no 6, opus 74, the 'Pathétique'.  This movement was recorded April 18, 1921 in the Camden Church Studio. The recording is a fine performance; open, balanced, and detailed.  Stokowski had previously rejected recording sessions of this movement in 1917, 1920 and the previous month in 1921.  In fact, the 1917 effort was of the full third movement, rather than this heavily truncated version. Even with this selectivity as to takes, the issued recording was of take number 11 of a total of 12 different takes made that day in April, 1921.
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;"> 
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;"><strong>It is somewhat unusual that 11 takes of this side were necessary for a successful release.  However, we should also consider the many hundreds of acoustic sides which were recorded, yet never released.  This is a testament to the difficulties and unpredictability of acoustic recording.</strong>
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;"> 
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;">By the way, the orchesta consisted of 80 musicians in the 1917 recordings. Talk about sardines.
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;"> 
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;">Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 21st, 2012, 1:51 pm #7


I guess Whiteman was very demanding. I remind you of the 6 takes of From Monday On.

Albert
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alan Matheson
alan Matheson

June 22nd, 2012, 3:34 am #8

Thanks for those interesting responses-certainly what you say makes sense. Judging by the amazing photos that Vince posted re: the Gennett studios, recording a band like Whiteman's using the acoustic set up must have been really difficult! All the care that Victor took paid off, in my view, given how good the 1920-25 Whiteman recordings sound.
Having said, and to get us back to Bix, his cornet sound certainly came off well during the acoustic era. Despite the major limitations of the acoustic recording process, his wonderful tone registers so well on those 1924-25 records.
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

June 26th, 2012, 3:04 am #9

Nothing anyone has said explains why this particular recording was so troublesome. I hear nothing in the music or the recording itself that could have posed any special challenge over and above any other tunes Whiteman was waxing. Both his musicians and the Victor staff were the top men in their respective businesses and could cut anything. My guess is: somebody had a bee in his bonnet. There must have been some picayune detail that no casual listener would have heard (or cared about if he did), that assumed epic proportions in the mind of Someone In Charge. I can't imagine what it could have been, but that's the usual way these things happen.

Charlie Chaplin, some film buff has calculated, had a takes-to-print ratio of 53-to-1 when he was making 2-reel shorts for Mutual in 1917. His bonnet was FULL of bees. This is all documented in the BBC series "The Unknown Chaplin." Since Chaplin was a genius, it all paid off artistically. I don't know if the same is true for Whiteman, at least in the case of "My Mammy."

-Brad Kay
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 27th, 2012, 1:04 pm #10


It took Charlot (as I think of him because I became a fan as a child) two years and eight months to film my all-time favorite movie, <em>City Lights. </em>



Chaplin spent several weeks and took repeated takes in order to film the three minutes where the blind girl is introduced. It looks so spontaneous, but every detail is thought out and tried in advance, over and over and over.

21 takes? Peanuts. According to one source, Chaplin took 342 takes of the scene in <em>City Lights </em>where the tramp meets the blind girl.

I love the music in the soundtrack, <em>La Violetera</em> by Jose Padilla. Here is a version as a tango by the immortal Carlos Gardel, recorded in the 1920s.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoN4bUWnaeE

Allow an old man to reminisce. When I was a child and my mom and I visited one of her friends who had a piano in the house, at my urging, my mom sat at the piano and played <em>La Violetera.</em>

Albert
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