Mississippi Mud: Why wasn't James Cavanaugh mentioned?

Mississippi Mud: Why wasn't James Cavanaugh mentioned?

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 9th, 2012, 2:19 pm #1


According to the ASCAP data base and the Library of Congress copyright, <em>Mississippi Mud </em>was composed by James Cavanaugh and Harry Barris. However, several sources only mention Harry Barris.

Bix recorded <em>Mississippi Mud</em> twice, once with Trumbauer and once with Whiteman. One take of the Trumbauer recording was issued, while two takes of the Whiteman recording were issued. Here are some of the record labels, all mention Barris only.

 
(lots of errors on this label)











Here is the record label by The Seven Polar Bears. Again, just Barris.



Here is the label of the Ray Charles recording.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

One edition of the sheet music gives "Words and Music by Harry Barris."


<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">On the other hand, this edition of the sheet music gives credit only to James Cavanaugh.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

James Cavanaugh (1892-1967) was a well-known songwriter. From IMDB

Songwriter ("Mississippi Mud", "I Like Mountain Music", "You're Nobody 'til Somebody Loves You", "Christmas in Killarney") and author, educated in public schools, then a writer of vaudeville material, collaborating with John Redmond, Nat Simon, Frank Weldon, Vincent Rose, Larry Stock, Dick Robertson and Harry Barris. Joining ASCAP in 1933, his other popular-song compositions include "The Horse with the Lavender Eyes", "The Umbrella Man", "You're In My Power", "The Gaucho Serenade", "Crosstown", "Whistling in the Wildwood", "The Man with the Mandolin", "You're Breaking My Heart All Over Again", "I Came, I Saw, I Conga'd", "A Little on the Lonely Side", "I'd Do It All Over Again", "On a Simmery Summery Day", and "Dearest Darling".

So, why wasn't James Cavanaugh given credit in the record labels and sheet music?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 9th, 2012, 2:50 pm #2

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Rob Rothberg
Rob Rothberg

May 9th, 2012, 8:45 pm #3

According to the ASCAP data base and the Library of Congress copyright, <em>Mississippi Mud </em>was composed by James Cavanaugh and Harry Barris. However, several sources only mention Harry Barris.

Bix recorded <em>Mississippi Mud</em> twice, once with Trumbauer and once with Whiteman. One take of the Trumbauer recording was issued, while two takes of the Whiteman recording were issued. Here are some of the record labels, all mention Barris only.

 
(lots of errors on this label)











Here is the record label by The Seven Polar Bears. Again, just Barris.



Here is the label of the Ray Charles recording.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

One edition of the sheet music gives "Words and Music by Harry Barris."


<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">On the other hand, this edition of the sheet music gives credit only to James Cavanaugh.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

James Cavanaugh (1892-1967) was a well-known songwriter. From IMDB

Songwriter ("Mississippi Mud", "I Like Mountain Music", "You're Nobody 'til Somebody Loves You", "Christmas in Killarney") and author, educated in public schools, then a writer of vaudeville material, collaborating with John Redmond, Nat Simon, Frank Weldon, Vincent Rose, Larry Stock, Dick Robertson and Harry Barris. Joining ASCAP in 1933, his other popular-song compositions include "The Horse with the Lavender Eyes", "The Umbrella Man", "You're In My Power", "The Gaucho Serenade", "Crosstown", "Whistling in the Wildwood", "The Man with the Mandolin", "You're Breaking My Heart All Over Again", "I Came, I Saw, I Conga'd", "A Little on the Lonely Side", "I'd Do It All Over Again", "On a Simmery Summery Day", and "Dearest Darling".

So, why wasn't James Cavanaugh given credit in the record labels and sheet music?
The original sheet music from 1927 credits only Barris. Under the copyright law then in force, a copyright had a term of 28 years, with the possibility of a renewal term of 28 years. I see on the net pictures of sheet music from 1955 (cover only) that credits Barris and Cavanaugh (http://www.ebay.com/itm/MISSISSIPPI-MUD ... 2549cd4032 ). My guess would be that when the copyright was renewed in 1955, Cavanaugh supplied updated or additional lyrics with Barris's permission and took co-composer credit. A site that sells an arrangement of the song (http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/Mis ... ud/5406562# ) includes a sound file with some lyrics that may be new.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 9th, 2012, 9:13 pm #4


There is a citation of a copyright in 1944 with both Barris and Cavanaugh. From "Catalog of Copyright Entries."

http://books.google.com/books?id=cztjAA ... &q&f=false

<em>"Mississippi Mud, fox-trot, Harry Barris & James Cavanaugh, arr. Jimmy Dale, orch. parts c June 16, 1944 E pub 123386; Shapiro, Bernstein & co., inc., New York."</em>

This is less than 28 years after 1927. I am still "in the dark."

Albert
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Rob Rothberg
Rob Rothberg

May 9th, 2012, 9:59 pm #5

And I am still in a mist!

Maybe Cavanaugh added the lyrics before 1955 and Jimmy Dale's 1944 arrangement includes them; I don't know. (Doesn't this seem like the sort of question as to which Brad might have some flashes?)
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

May 10th, 2012, 9:29 am #6

I'm as much In The Dark as the rest of youse.

-BK
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 12th, 2012, 4:08 pm #7

According to the ASCAP data base and the Library of Congress copyright, <em>Mississippi Mud </em>was composed by James Cavanaugh and Harry Barris. However, several sources only mention Harry Barris.

Bix recorded <em>Mississippi Mud</em> twice, once with Trumbauer and once with Whiteman. One take of the Trumbauer recording was issued, while two takes of the Whiteman recording were issued. Here are some of the record labels, all mention Barris only.

 
(lots of errors on this label)











Here is the record label by The Seven Polar Bears. Again, just Barris.



Here is the label of the Ray Charles recording.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

One edition of the sheet music gives "Words and Music by Harry Barris."


<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">On the other hand, this edition of the sheet music gives credit only to James Cavanaugh.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

James Cavanaugh (1892-1967) was a well-known songwriter. From IMDB

Songwriter ("Mississippi Mud", "I Like Mountain Music", "You're Nobody 'til Somebody Loves You", "Christmas in Killarney") and author, educated in public schools, then a writer of vaudeville material, collaborating with John Redmond, Nat Simon, Frank Weldon, Vincent Rose, Larry Stock, Dick Robertson and Harry Barris. Joining ASCAP in 1933, his other popular-song compositions include "The Horse with the Lavender Eyes", "The Umbrella Man", "You're In My Power", "The Gaucho Serenade", "Crosstown", "Whistling in the Wildwood", "The Man with the Mandolin", "You're Breaking My Heart All Over Again", "I Came, I Saw, I Conga'd", "A Little on the Lonely Side", "I'd Do It All Over Again", "On a Simmery Summery Day", and "Dearest Darling".

So, why wasn't James Cavanaugh given credit in the record labels and sheet music?
Some of what follows comes from the collections of Nick and Rob.

<em>Mississippi Mud</em> by The Sylvians.

<a href="http://bixbeidercke.com/SylviansMississippiMud.jpg"></a>



The record label of the Rhythmic Eight version does not cite Cavanaugh either.

Sheet Music from the 1920s.

<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixbeiderbecke.com/MississippiMu ... gement.jpg">

I point out that Satterfield wrote the arrangement for Whiteman's recording of the tune and he was music director for the session.

Credit in the record label for the Rhythm Boys recording of <em>Mississippi Mud/I Left My Sugar Standing inthe Rain </em>is given to Harry Barris, Irving Kahal and Sammy Fain. The last two were the composers of <em>I Left My Sugar Standing inthe Rain.</em>
<div>There is also a short movie made in 1929 with Paul Tremaine's Orchestra performing <em>Mississippi Mud</em>, and according to IMDB Cavanaugh is also uncredited in this. The number was revived for the 1937 movie short "Swing Wedding" and once again Cavanaugh is uncredited.</div>
Don Rayno in his Whiteman biography gives the following
<div><span><em>Mississippi Mud/So the Blackbirds and the Bluebirds Got Together</em> (Harry Barris, Billy Moll)</span></div><div><span>Vocals by the Rhythm Boys (Bing Crosby/Al Rinker/Harry Barris); piano by Barris. [Billy Moll is the composer of  <em>So the Blackbirds and the Bluebirds Got Together.]</em></span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span>Nick points out that Barris and Cavanaugh collaborated in other tunes recorded by the Rhythm Boys.</span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span><em>Wa-Da-Da</em>. It will be seen that credit is given to both on the record label and on the sheet music.</span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span><img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixbeiderbecke.com/WaDaDaRhythmBoys.jpg"></span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span><img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixbeiderbecke.com/Wadadasheetmusic.jpg"></span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span>For <em>That's Grandma </em>credit is given as  "Barris, Cavanaugh and Crosby."</span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span><img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixbeiderbecke.com/ThatsGrandmaRhythmBoys.jpg"></span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span>And again credit is given to Cavanaugh in the label of Bix and His Gang's recording of <em>Wa-Da-Da.</em></span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span><img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixbeiderbecke.com/WaDaDABixOkeh.jpg"></span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span>So why isn't credit given to Cavanaugh in recordings and most sheet music of<em> Mississppi Mud?</em></span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span>Thanks to Nick and Rob for scans and helpful dialogues.</span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span>Albert</span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span>PS </span><div><span>Columbia 1819-D gives Barris and Moll as composers of <em>So the Blackbirds and the Bluebirds Got Together.

</em></span><span><img alt="[linked image]" src="http://www.redhotjazz.com/Columbia-1819-D.jpg"></span></div><div><span></span> </div><div><span>Billy Moll also is credited as composer with Ted Koehler and Harry Barris for another Bing tune, "Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams."</span></div></div>
Last edited by ahaim on May 12th, 2012, 4:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 13th, 2012, 1:02 pm #8

Nick kindly sends in this wave file where he juxtaposed fragments form Bix's In A Mist and Barris's Wa-Da-Da and writes, <div><em>Attached are the phrases from Bix (In A Mist) and Barris (Wa Da Da) that seem (to my ears) to provide evidence that Barris was influenced by Bix. Listen to the similar descending left hand phrases, while the right hand is harmonically and melodically close.</em></div>
Listen <embed src="http://bixbeiderbecke.com/BixandBarris.wav" autostart="true" width="144" height="72" style="background-color:inherit">

Indeed, strong resemblance. Thanks, Nick.

Albert
<div><em>
</em></div>
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Bill
Bill

November 29th, 2012, 9:21 pm #9

According to the ASCAP data base and the Library of Congress copyright, <em>Mississippi Mud </em>was composed by James Cavanaugh and Harry Barris. However, several sources only mention Harry Barris.

Bix recorded <em>Mississippi Mud</em> twice, once with Trumbauer and once with Whiteman. One take of the Trumbauer recording was issued, while two takes of the Whiteman recording were issued. Here are some of the record labels, all mention Barris only.

 
(lots of errors on this label)











Here is the record label by The Seven Polar Bears. Again, just Barris.



Here is the label of the Ray Charles recording.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

One edition of the sheet music gives "Words and Music by Harry Barris."


<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">On the other hand, this edition of the sheet music gives credit only to James Cavanaugh.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">

James Cavanaugh (1892-1967) was a well-known songwriter. From IMDB

Songwriter ("Mississippi Mud", "I Like Mountain Music", "You're Nobody 'til Somebody Loves You", "Christmas in Killarney") and author, educated in public schools, then a writer of vaudeville material, collaborating with John Redmond, Nat Simon, Frank Weldon, Vincent Rose, Larry Stock, Dick Robertson and Harry Barris. Joining ASCAP in 1933, his other popular-song compositions include "The Horse with the Lavender Eyes", "The Umbrella Man", "You're In My Power", "The Gaucho Serenade", "Crosstown", "Whistling in the Wildwood", "The Man with the Mandolin", "You're Breaking My Heart All Over Again", "I Came, I Saw, I Conga'd", "A Little on the Lonely Side", "I'd Do It All Over Again", "On a Simmery Summery Day", and "Dearest Darling".

So, why wasn't James Cavanaugh given credit in the record labels and sheet music?
I have no idea, James Cavanaugh is my grandfather and I have the sheet music in my home for Mississppi Mud along with many others.
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Linda
Linda

July 28th, 2013, 8:36 pm #10

I also am looking into this. Are the lyrics different? The sheet music I have does not mention James Cavanaugh. It is an artist copy from 1927 and the lyrics are....well .... not nice.
Maybe you grandfather changed them.
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