Miff, my favorite trombonist!

Miff, my favorite trombonist!

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 16th, 2017, 3:16 pm #1

Richard DuPage’s, "Miff Mole, First Trailblazer of Modern Jazz Trombone,” Record Research, No. 34, April, 1961.
Lots of great photos.
https://ia800301.us.archive.org/21/item ... R%2034.pdf

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on December 16th, 2017, 4:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like
Share

John Coffin
John Coffin

December 16th, 2017, 5:55 pm #2

After all these years, I still feel a disconnect with Mole and Rank's styles. In their hands, the trombone is a different voice from the one shared by most later trombonists. In my current listening, Mole is beginning to make sense to me, and the very early sound of Tommy Dorsey is a kind of bridge to the 'non-Mole-ish' side.
Reply
Share

Ralph Wondraschek
Ralph Wondraschek

December 16th, 2017, 7:35 pm #3

Richard DuPage’s, "Miff Mole, First Trailblazer of Modern Jazz Trombone,” Record Research, No. 34, April, 1961.
Lots of great photos.
https://ia800301.us.archive.org/21/item ... R%2034.pdf

Albert
.. for instance, Mole did not join the Sam Lanin orchestra in 1919 (as DuPage states), but in April 1921.

For a more thorough and detailed chronology of Miff's early career, see:

http://www.vjm.biz/178-om5-part-1-internet.pdf

and

http://www.vjm.biz/179-om5-part-2.pdf

Ralph

Reply
Share

Ralph Wondraschek
Ralph Wondraschek

December 16th, 2017, 7:41 pm #4

... the OM5's engagement at the Claridge Cabaret (formely Blue Bird) in Montreal did not last for 5 months, but only for 6 weeks (February 08 - March 26, 1921).

Ralph
Reply
Share

wellwisher
wellwisher

December 18th, 2017, 6:02 pm #5

After all these years, I still feel a disconnect with Mole and Rank's styles. In their hands, the trombone is a different voice from the one shared by most later trombonists. In my current listening, Mole is beginning to make sense to me, and the very early sound of Tommy Dorsey is a kind of bridge to the 'non-Mole-ish' side.
The pity of it is that the Miff of old was a far cry from his later work with the Condon mob. Dixieland ruining another wonderful player. Seems only the great Pee Wee was impervious.
Reply
Share

David Sager
David Sager

December 19th, 2017, 5:54 pm #6

I disagree. I think Miff's Commodore work is splendid. Sudhalter's chapter on Mole in Lost Chords has a very good analysis of that period.
Reply
Share

Brad Kay
Brad Kay

December 27th, 2017, 11:43 pm #7

To me, Miff Mole was a great, impeccable stylist of the trombone, who never played a bad note and from 1921 on, consistently showed us what the lowly slush-pump was truly capable of. His style was distinctly different from Higgy, Tea, and Jimmy (whom I also revere).

Why, all of a sudden, did Miff get pushed to the sidelines? Just because the above-named worthies made their splash in the late '20s was no reason for this abrupt neglect.

Lester Young didn't make Coleman Hawkins obsolete. They co-existed rather well for their whole careers. Why did Miff Mole have to get off the Earth?

Just asking.

Brad Kay
Reply
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 28th, 2017, 7:38 pm #8

Fromhttps://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmXoypizjW3WknFiJn ... _Mole.html

When Jack Teagarden arrived in New York in 1928, he quickly replaced Mole as the new role model for trombonists, with a more legato, blues-oriented approach.[5] Mole, having started working for radio in 1927 (at WOR), changed his focus to working with NBC (1929–38). In 1938–40 he was a member of Paul Whiteman's orchestra, but his style by then had changed under the influence of Teagarden. In 1942–3 Mole played in Benny Goodman's orchestra, and between 1942–7 he led various dixieland bands. He worked in Chicago in 1947–54.[5] Due to bad health, Mole played very sporadically during his last years.[5]

Albert
Reply
Like
Share