Miff and Abe

Miff and Abe

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 15th, 2017, 12:37 am #1

Fromhttp://www.vjm.biz/articles8.htm

The Orpheum Circuit was based on the West Coast, and so it is no surprise that one day in 1921, Vi Quinn and her little jazz band came Los Angeles. A row developed among the bandsmen for reasons which have never clearly been substantiated which brought the act to an end, and one member of the jazz band decided to stay a while in sunny California. This was trombonist Miff Mole, who joined Abe Lyman's band when Roy, Ray and Gus were members. Talking about Ray Lopez, Roy Fox relates in his book that "he handled the jazz and I played "sweet", and "when he and Miff and Gussie "busked" a few choruses it was something I'll never forget". Miff soon tired of Los Angeles and stayed only for a short time, and was probably replaced by Vic Smith.

Unfortunately Miff and Abe did not record at the time. According to Rust, Lyman's first recording was on July 26, 1923 in New York.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rB3voz1JfxU

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 15th, 2017, 12:51 am #2

.... the first recording of Abe Lyman was in Santa Monica, CA, c. September,1922
Those longing for you blues Nordskog 3019, Timeless (Du)CBC1-059 [CD]
Are you playing fair?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pW_jfIxfvtk

Albert
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

June 16th, 2017, 7:41 am #3

HOW CUM NOBODY writes about this record?? Abe Lyman's "Those Longing For You, Blues" (Nordskog 3018) should be, must be, MUCH better known! Especially by now.

It's the very first (Sept. 1922) truly, terrifyingly, satisfying hot record ever made by a white band. It features an uptempo, swinging 4/4 beat all the way through, propulsive riffs, uncompromising solos by Ray Lopez on cornet and Slim Martin on Trombone, a two-cornet break right out of the King Oliver playbook, and an astounding go-to-hell finish with Martin and Lopez taking no prisoners, with Lopez blowing a climactic break that will leave you breathless.

You get the feeling that the Lyman band had worked over this tune for months on the stand before the record was cut. The Coconut Grove must have been wild, especially late at night. This record easily is on a par with "Ory's Creole Trombone," recorded for the same label only three months earlier.

"T.L.F.Y. Blues" was a successful pop tune that had already been covered five or six times on other labels by other bands (e.g., The Benson Orchestra of Chicago did it for Victor). But none of them hint at the hotness of this Abe Lyman. Here is incontestable evidence that all the elements of hot jazz were in place, as early as September, 1922, in exotic Los Angeles.

The transfer you chose, Albert, sounded awful! Here's a slightly better one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fMBhCGeHso





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Andrew J. Sammut
Andrew J. Sammut

June 16th, 2017, 1:20 pm #4

Though it was recorded years later, I wonder the same thing about the Lyman band's recording of "Shake That Thing" from 1926. The whole band <em>struts</em> to a rhythmic feel that must have been incredible to dance to (with Jake Garcia's slap bass beautifully recorded) and Slim Martin turns his comic vocal style into a hot solo that makes me think he was listening to some Kid Ory. For me, this record is up there with Goldkette's "My Pretty Girl" and Keppard with Doc Cooke on the Columbia "Here Comes The Hot Tamale Man."

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 16th, 2017, 1:49 pm #5

HOW CUM NOBODY writes about this record?? Abe Lyman's "Those Longing For You, Blues" (Nordskog 3018) should be, must be, MUCH better known! Especially by now.

It's the very first (Sept. 1922) truly, terrifyingly, satisfying hot record ever made by a white band. It features an uptempo, swinging 4/4 beat all the way through, propulsive riffs, uncompromising solos by Ray Lopez on cornet and Slim Martin on Trombone, a two-cornet break right out of the King Oliver playbook, and an astounding go-to-hell finish with Martin and Lopez taking no prisoners, with Lopez blowing a climactic break that will leave you breathless.

You get the feeling that the Lyman band had worked over this tune for months on the stand before the record was cut. The Coconut Grove must have been wild, especially late at night. This record easily is on a par with "Ory's Creole Trombone," recorded for the same label only three months earlier.

"T.L.F.Y. Blues" was a successful pop tune that had already been covered five or six times on other labels by other bands (e.g., The Benson Orchestra of Chicago did it for Victor). But none of them hint at the hotness of this Abe Lyman. Here is incontestable evidence that all the elements of hot jazz were in place, as early as September, 1922, in exotic Los Angeles.

The transfer you chose, Albert, sounded awful! Here's a slightly better one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fMBhCGeHso




For my next WBIX program, I chose Bix tunes recorded by Abe Lyman and Ben Pollack. One of the Sharps and Flats recordings I chose is really torrid. Stay tuned.

Albert
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John
John

June 17th, 2017, 3:32 pm #6

Though it was recorded years later, I wonder the same thing about the Lyman band's recording of "Shake That Thing" from 1926. The whole band <em>struts</em> to a rhythmic feel that must have been incredible to dance to (with Jake Garcia's slap bass beautifully recorded) and Slim Martin turns his comic vocal style into a hot solo that makes me think he was listening to some Kid Ory. For me, this record is up there with Goldkette's "My Pretty Girl" and Keppard with Doc Cooke on the Columbia "Here Comes The Hot Tamale Man."
It says right on the label "for dancing"!
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

June 18th, 2017, 4:49 pm #7

Though it was recorded years later, I wonder the same thing about the Lyman band's recording of "Shake That Thing" from 1926. The whole band <em>struts</em> to a rhythmic feel that must have been incredible to dance to (with Jake Garcia's slap bass beautifully recorded) and Slim Martin turns his comic vocal style into a hot solo that makes me think he was listening to some Kid Ory. For me, this record is up there with Goldkette's "My Pretty Girl" and Keppard with Doc Cooke on the Columbia "Here Comes The Hot Tamale Man."
Yea, Andrew, that Brunswick "Shake That Thing" and especially "Too Bad" from the same time are also in Go To Hell mode, with Lyman's guys totally sustaining their hotness. By 1926, this wasn't so unusual any more on records, what with a closely competitive "Too Bad" by King Oliver on Vocalion.

But in September of 1922, it WAS unusual. "Those Longing For You, Blues" is a total outlier, a record without which, we would scarcely have a clue about just HOW hot bands could play then. If Lyman was lighting the fuse in distant L. A., you can bet scores of other bands were doing the same thing at the same time.

-Brad Kay
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David Sager
David Sager

June 19th, 2017, 5:02 pm #8

For my next WBIX program, I chose Bix tunes recorded by Abe Lyman and Ben Pollack. One of the Sharps and Flats recordings I chose is really torrid. Stay tuned.

Albert
Lyman's "Shake that thing" and "Too bad" both bring to mind King Oliver's Dixie Syncopators in a profound way. Of course Oliver also recorded "Too bad" using the very same stock arrangement.
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Mark Gabrish Conlan
Mark Gabrish Conlan

June 30th, 2017, 5:33 pm #9

"San," from 1928: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnSQt5qPW-Q

Wild! Hotter than the Whiteman-Bix version even though none of Lyman's soloists were at Bix's level.
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

June 30th, 2017, 11:27 pm #10

"San" is red-hot all right. But we're nearing the end of the Lyman list of scorchers. A shame that so many inspired red-hot white bands like Abe Lyman's were obliged to make so many ho-hum records. And also a shame that so many accomplished black bands were obliged ALWAYS to play hot, even though they were well-versed in the classics. Some clever fellow in the pseudonym department at OKeh or Victor could have rectified the situation to everyone's satisfaction.

And who WAS at Bix's level as a soloist?

-Brad Kay
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