Let me try and explain myself

Let me try and explain myself

condonschicagoans
condonschicagoans

November 16th, 2005, 6:57 pm #1

I have NO evidence that I am in any way related to the dandy Eddie Condon. Yes, I do share his last name, and he does bear a striking resemblence to my father. I was born and raised in the south side of Chicago, so we come from relatively close quarters. And until I find proof of any relation, I can always dream that there is jazz in my blood, right? Besides, I owe Eddie the world of traditional jazz that I've discovered in the past year. Ever do one of the "name searches" on the internet? You type in your name and see what pops up? When I tried that once, I found out about this old jazz musician name Albert "Eddie" Condon. (Albert is my fathers middle name by the way. AND NO I'M NOT MAKING ALL THIS UP!) So, I did some more searching, and eventually bought my copy of his Scrapbook off of Ebay. He kept mentioning this Bix guy. I never heard of the fellow, but I trusted Eddie's good taste at that point and checked out a Bix cd from my school library. Let's just say my life hasn't been the same since.


Nobody can second my claim about Brunswick records? Let me find a link to thwart the non-believers.

FROM http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst ... ddy19.html
"Last year, Columbia bought a property two doors north of that lot at 619 S. Wabash, the former Universal Bowling building. It already owned the building next door, 623 S. Wabash, the former Brunswick building, which currently houses classrooms."
Now do you want me to post my schedule that states that I did indeed have a class in that building last semester? I learned of this fact from reading Jean Pierre Lion's biography of Bix. Which I heard was the best one out there.


Believe me, I am constantly running into coincidences that tie me into Bix and Eddie Condon. Without sounding to be pretentious or arrogant, I sometimes like to believe that their spirits are driving me to keep their legacy alive. At least for my generation.
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Warren Kilbourne
Warren Kilbourne

November 16th, 2005, 9:19 pm #2

About a year ago, someone wanted to visit all the places where Bix recorded: New York to Chicago to a pile of bricks in Richmond, Indiana. There was a list of these locations. I'm sure that Mr. Haim can find this information for you.
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condonschicagoans
condonschicagoans

November 16th, 2005, 9:25 pm #3

Is that all that's left of Gennet records? A pile of rubble? Sad. I read when King Oliver's band recorded there, they couldn't stay in town for fear of the KKK. Guess they also used the facility for hate records and such.
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Albert Haim
Albert Haim

November 16th, 2005, 9:51 pm #4

I have NO evidence that I am in any way related to the dandy Eddie Condon. Yes, I do share his last name, and he does bear a striking resemblence to my father. I was born and raised in the south side of Chicago, so we come from relatively close quarters. And until I find proof of any relation, I can always dream that there is jazz in my blood, right? Besides, I owe Eddie the world of traditional jazz that I've discovered in the past year. Ever do one of the "name searches" on the internet? You type in your name and see what pops up? When I tried that once, I found out about this old jazz musician name Albert "Eddie" Condon. (Albert is my fathers middle name by the way. AND NO I'M NOT MAKING ALL THIS UP!) So, I did some more searching, and eventually bought my copy of his Scrapbook off of Ebay. He kept mentioning this Bix guy. I never heard of the fellow, but I trusted Eddie's good taste at that point and checked out a Bix cd from my school library. Let's just say my life hasn't been the same since.


Nobody can second my claim about Brunswick records? Let me find a link to thwart the non-believers.

FROM http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst ... ddy19.html
"Last year, Columbia bought a property two doors north of that lot at 619 S. Wabash, the former Universal Bowling building. It already owned the building next door, 623 S. Wabash, the former Brunswick building, which currently houses classrooms."
Now do you want me to post my schedule that states that I did indeed have a class in that building last semester? I learned of this fact from reading Jean Pierre Lion's biography of Bix. Which I heard was the best one out there.


Believe me, I am constantly running into coincidences that tie me into Bix and Eddie Condon. Without sounding to be pretentious or arrogant, I sometimes like to believe that their spirits are driving me to keep their legacy alive. At least for my generation.
I, for one, believe that you are taking courses at 623 S. Wabash Avenue. However, the link between the Brunswick recording studio in Chicago and Bix is a highly contentious issue among Bixophiles.

Brad Kay, musician, collector, and Bixophile extraordinaire has postulated that the second cornetist in Ray Miller's recording of "Cradle of Love" is Bix. His thorough and highly informative analysis is available in the Bixography website. See http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/recordi ... m#Cradleof
In addition, search "Cradle of Love" in the forum search function.

You may be surprised by the amount of virtual ink and blood that this minor recording has generated. Some have the strong belief that Bix is the second soloist. Others feel as strongly that it is not Bix. Friendships have been broken (unilaterally) on this issue.

The latest on "Cradle of Love" is my posting a few hours ago and Paul's response (which I endorse. I will remove the Lou Raderman recordings from my list of Bix recordings and will list them in an appendix as possible Bix recordings. However, I note that Phil Evans, the foremost Bix researcher in the world, Michael Brooks, noted researcher and record producer, and I are of the opinion that Bix played in these recordings. However, I agree with Paul that, for the sake of future Bixophiles, only recordings where Bix has been definitivley proven to be present are to be included in a list of Bix recordings.) I am, by now, 99.9999 % certain the second soloist in Miller's "Cradle of Love" is not Bix. The reason that my level of certainty does not reach 100 % is that I was trained as a research scientist and, thus, I am somewhat of a skeptic.

In summary, many Bixophiles do not accept the claim of a link between Bix and the Chicago Brusnwick studios on January 24, 1929. Perhaps, that added to your undocumented suggestion of a family relationship to Eddie Condon, led some people to disregard your posting as a series of fictitious claims. I understood all your postings very well, and I have no complaints. If I had, people who have read the forum for a while and know my argumentative nature, realize that I would have responded to your posts with a long diatribe. You clearly stated that your family relationship to Eddie Condon is only a belief/postulate on your part, and you seem to accept implicitely the material in Lion's book as fact. Don't believe all you see in print. For a harsh criticism of a few secions of Lion's book, see my review in http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/%7Ealhaim/biogr ... biographie

Albert
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Mike May
Mike May

November 17th, 2005, 2:40 pm #5

Is that all that's left of Gennet records? A pile of rubble? Sad. I read when King Oliver's band recorded there, they couldn't stay in town for fear of the KKK. Guess they also used the facility for hate records and such.
In regards to what's left of Gennett, there is a bit more than a few bricks leftover. Direct your browser to ww.starr-gennett.org, and I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

As to your comment about King Oliver, based on what I've read in various Louis Armstrong biographies, the King Oliver band was happy to have the opportunity to record, and they and many other black bands recorded for Gennett (Doc Cooke, Jelly Roll Morton, to name two other black bandleaders.)

Mike
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Scott
Scott

November 17th, 2005, 9:19 pm #6

Gennett basically recorded anyone that could cover costs. They didn't care if they were black, white, politicians or the Klan. The Klan was recorded mainly because a) they were a power in the area and b) because they put the money up front. KKK records show up on eBay quite often and go for good prices even though the recording quality is lackluster. While it is true that Indiana was the bedrock of the Klan (despite the assertion that it was a Southern only phenomenon) most jazz musicians didn't come to stay. They usually came from Chicago or Detroit or wherever to record and then went back to the job. The book Jelly Roll, Bix and Hoagy gives the best description of Richmond, Gennett, the Gennett family and the recordings.
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

November 17th, 2005, 11:03 pm #7

I have collected about a dozen of those Gennett KKK records, and have taken the trouble to listen closely to them. They deserve a detailed monograph. But briefly: The big surprise, when you boil down the content of the songs and the occasional speech, is that there is not one single word leveled against blacks. The main item on the Klan's agenda was to stop the massive immigration that had been going on since the Irish potato famine of the 1840s. It was especially the influx, from 1880 or so, of East European Catholics and Jews with their "foreign" ideas that roused the Klan to such heights of song and story. Add to this paeans of loyalty to the good old U.S.A. and to the Klan itself, and you have the basic package. Most of the music is filched from well-known Christian hymns (i.e., "Onward Valiant Klansmen" = "Onward Christian Soldiers" etc.), though some are originals. There's even a comic element in songs like "The Stuttering Klansman." My personal favorite amongst the ones I've heard is "Why I Am a Klansman" (KKK 75003). The tune is jaunty and jolly, and the record is something of a production with a string section, vocal quartet and soloist. The whole thing is catchy and perverse enough to be the granddaddy of "Springtime For Hitler."

The Klan was the victim of its own success: In 1925, when largely due to Klan lobbying, Congress enacted the immigration quota law, Klan membership plummeted from millions to the few die-hard racist bigots it retains today. That is why there were no KKK 78s made after about 1924. Still, it makes me smile to imagine the Wolverines, or better yet King Oliver's band, sitting with "The 100% Americans" in the hallway outside the Gennett studio, all awaiting their turn to cut records.

-Brad Kay
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Scott
Scott

November 17th, 2005, 11:36 pm #8

I only have one - KKK 75001 The Bright Fiery Cross backed by Mystic City. Both seem to be knockoffs of hymns and do concern immigration. Both are by the 100% Americans. However in listening to these recordings I sometimes wonder if some of them were recorded in New York and shipped to Indiana along with other Gennett masters. I can't pinpoint it but some of the voices sound familiar. I would suspect I am wrong and all of them were recorded at Richmond but the thought is still there.

The one I would like to hear is "Daddy Swiped Our Last Clean Sheet and Joined the Ku Klux Klan." That should be a classic
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Warren Kilbourne
Warren Kilbourne

November 18th, 2005, 3:51 am #9

James Condon may or may not know about conditions at the Gennett recording studios in the 20's, with the railroad tracks running right by the building--with predictable results.
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Scott
Scott

November 18th, 2005, 4:53 am #10

A KKK pressing


A standard Gennett pressing from 1922 or 1923


A later Gennett recorded subsidiary label


And totally unrelated, an autographed photo of the lovely Edythe Wright
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