Is Anyone Else Listening to Phil Schaap?

Joined: March 18th, 2018, 7:10 pm

March 31st, 2018, 12:41 am #31

John Coffin wrote: I heard several 78s of Clarke when I was struggling, and grabbed a copy of the 'studies' soon after. I haven't seen mind 30 years at least, so I don't trust my memory too much about which one was played as an endless series of ½ step triplets from the bottom range on up.
It is the 7th study that make use of the triplets over the entire cornet and trumpet range-and I noted that the Clarke studies book was published as early as 1912. Quite likely many of Bix's contemporaries would have known this book. 
I think many people might be surprised how many early jazz and swing trumpet players knew this type of etude material.
Certainly, Louis' "Cornet Chop Suey" bears more than a passing resemblence to the etudes in the Arban and Clarke cornet methods.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: March 15th, 2018, 4:56 pm

March 31st, 2018, 1:31 am #32

Lots of influence from non-jazz sources. Caruso and John McCormick, lots of 'salon' soloists and Victorian 'flash-trash.'

I read the Bechet's favorite singer was Richard Tauber.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: March 18th, 2018, 7:10 pm

March 31st, 2018, 3:10 am #33

John Coffin wrote: Lots of influence from non-jazz sources. Caruso and John McCormick, lots of 'salon' soloists and Victorian 'flash-trash.'

I read the Bechet's favorite singer was Richard Tauber.
Yes, that's true. I'd be interested, though, in tracing the amount of influence the work of early 20th century brass soloists (like H.L. Clarke and Arthur Pryor) had on early jazz soloists like Bix, Armstrong, Miff Mole et al. Perhaps Dave Sager will weigh in on this topic. Clark Terry mentions in his autobiography that as a young player in St. Louis he would wait outside Joseph Gustat's studio and ask exiting students what Mr. Gustat had shown them that day. Clark, like Bix and Louis, was a soloist who used technique in the service of musical expression and not as an end in itself.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: March 15th, 2018, 4:56 pm

March 31st, 2018, 4:57 pm #34

Its shocking how little real solo repertoire was generated by 'serious' composers of that era. Players like Clarke could have handled just about anything. Imagine a serious cornet concerto by Strauss, or a trombone sonata by Korngold.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: March 18th, 2018, 7:10 pm

April 8th, 2018, 8:11 am #35

John Coffin wrote: Its shocking how little real solo repertoire was generated by 'serious' composers of that era. Players like Clarke could have handled just about anything. Imagine a serious cornet concerto by Strauss, or a trombone sonata by Korngold.
I absolutely agree. It's odd that none of the "great" composers from the classical world were moved to write any brass concertos other than Vaughan-Williams' excellent tuba concert. One interesting example of mid-20th century "classical" brass composition in Jean Hubeau's trumpet sonata from 1943 which has a movement (the third) marked as "tempo di blues". Nat Shilkret's concerto for Tommy Dorsey is also an excellent and rather neglected piece which was revived by the wonderful trombonist, Jim Pugh.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: March 18th, 2018, 7:37 am

April 9th, 2018, 6:37 am #36

Hindemith did write some trumpet and trombone sonatas.     
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: March 18th, 2018, 7:10 pm

April 9th, 2018, 8:24 am #37

David Tenner wrote: Hindemith did write some trumpet and trombone sonatas.     
That's true and the Hindemith Sonatas are an important stable of brass music in the 20th century. I like to think that if Bix had survived a bit longer he might have created something of a longer form piece (concerto or a suite) that would have combined his interests in jazz and the music of the Impressionists like Ravel. Bill Challis told me that he'd wished that Bix had lived longer to help Bill's own arranging work. I could imagine Bill and Bix creating collaborative works in the way in which Miles Davis and Gil Evans did with projects like "Miles Ahead" and "Sketches Of Spain".
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 9th, 2018, 3:19 pm #38

Lowel Liebermann's "Trumpet Concerto.

Reply
Like
Share

Joined: March 15th, 2018, 4:56 pm

April 9th, 2018, 10:52 pm #39

My college library had an LP of Australian trumpet concerti. There were three of them by 1974. Not terribly distinguished, but in there trying.

I think most non-jazz composers and arrangers just aren't familiar enough with brass instruments. I read somewhere that Stravinsky provided all sorts of slide positions for some trombone parts he'd written—parts that were unplayable with ANY slide technique.
Reply
Like
Share