In My Merry Oldsmobile Record Labels

In My Merry Oldsmobile Record Labels

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 16th, 2010, 2:17 pm #1


French Bixophile Jean Claude points out that the record label of one of his copies (one acquired recently) of "In A Merry Oldsmobile" is slightly different than the one I posted in the Bixography and the one he has had in his collection for some time.

Here is the label of Jean Claude's new copy of the record.



Here is the label in the images section of the Bixography.



Jean Claude points out that the phrase "orthophonic recording" is located above the image of Nipper in the first image, whereas the phrase is located to the left of the spindle hole in the second image shown above.

As discussed in

http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/Article ... #MerryOlds

there was only one take of the recording as a waltz.

Jean Claude writes that the edition  "orthophonic record" above the Nipper seems to be a second pressing issued some years later. Jean Claude's suggestion is compatible with what is written in

http://majesticrecord.com/labelsvictor.htm

"As the electric era kicked in Victor changed the labels once again to the "Scroll" label, which ran from 1926-1937.  The earliest variety has the catalog number on the bottom.  It would soon move to the right of the hole and the words "Orthophonic Recording" would remain left of the hole.  These words would them get moved to above the trademark (1928-29). "

Does anyone know for sure if two pressings of Goldkette's "In A Merry Oldsmobile" were made, one in 1927 and the other in 1928-29? Jean Claude thinks this would be surprising since "In My Merry Oldsmobile"  is a "special record" commissioned by General Motors for the 1927 convention in Detroit.

Jean Claude asks about the statement on the label "For Private Use Only." My guess is that it was not supposed to be sold commercially in stores nor to be broadcast over radio stations. No?

Albert


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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 18th, 2010, 1:28 pm #3

French Bixophile Jean Claude points out that the record label of one of his copies (one acquired recently) of "In A Merry Oldsmobile" is slightly different than the one I posted in the Bixography and the one he has had in his collection for some time.

Here is the label of Jean Claude's new copy of the record.



Here is the label in the images section of the Bixography.



Jean Claude points out that the phrase "orthophonic recording" is located above the image of Nipper in the first image, whereas the phrase is located to the left of the spindle hole in the second image shown above.

As discussed in

http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/Article ... #MerryOlds

there was only one take of the recording as a waltz.

Jean Claude writes that the edition  "orthophonic record" above the Nipper seems to be a second pressing issued some years later. Jean Claude's suggestion is compatible with what is written in

http://majesticrecord.com/labelsvictor.htm

"As the electric era kicked in Victor changed the labels once again to the "Scroll" label, which ran from 1926-1937.  The earliest variety has the catalog number on the bottom.  It would soon move to the right of the hole and the words "Orthophonic Recording" would remain left of the hole.  These words would them get moved to above the trademark (1928-29). "

Does anyone know for sure if two pressings of Goldkette's "In A Merry Oldsmobile" were made, one in 1927 and the other in 1928-29? Jean Claude thinks this would be surprising since "In My Merry Oldsmobile"  is a "special record" commissioned by General Motors for the 1927 convention in Detroit.

Jean Claude asks about the statement on the label "For Private Use Only." My guess is that it was not supposed to be sold commercially in stores nor to be broadcast over radio stations. No?

Albert

Jean Claude Laval and Han Enderman sent scans of the Fox-trot version of "In My Merry Oldsmobile."





As you can see (and pointed out by Brad a while ago), the labels show RCA Victor, indicating a later printing. What is particularly interesting is that the reverse, the waltz version, gives Victor Talking Machine Co., not RCA Victor Company. On one particular record, two labels, one side from 1928-early 1929 and the other post-March 1929, when Radio Corporation of America purchased Victor. Are there other examples of Victor records displaying labels with "Victor Talking Machine" on one side and "RCA Victor Company" on the other?

Thanks to Jean-Claude and Han for their generosity in providing the scans.

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 19th, 2010, 7:50 pm #4

French Bixophile Jean Claude points out that the record label of one of his copies (one acquired recently) of "In A Merry Oldsmobile" is slightly different than the one I posted in the Bixography and the one he has had in his collection for some time.

Here is the label of Jean Claude's new copy of the record.



Here is the label in the images section of the Bixography.



Jean Claude points out that the phrase "orthophonic recording" is located above the image of Nipper in the first image, whereas the phrase is located to the left of the spindle hole in the second image shown above.

As discussed in

http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/Article ... #MerryOlds

there was only one take of the recording as a waltz.

Jean Claude writes that the edition  "orthophonic record" above the Nipper seems to be a second pressing issued some years later. Jean Claude's suggestion is compatible with what is written in

http://majesticrecord.com/labelsvictor.htm

"As the electric era kicked in Victor changed the labels once again to the "Scroll" label, which ran from 1926-1937.  The earliest variety has the catalog number on the bottom.  It would soon move to the right of the hole and the words "Orthophonic Recording" would remain left of the hole.  These words would them get moved to above the trademark (1928-29). "

Does anyone know for sure if two pressings of Goldkette's "In A Merry Oldsmobile" were made, one in 1927 and the other in 1928-29? Jean Claude thinks this would be surprising since "In My Merry Oldsmobile"  is a "special record" commissioned by General Motors for the 1927 convention in Detroit.

Jean Claude asks about the statement on the label "For Private Use Only." My guess is that it was not supposed to be sold commercially in stores nor to be broadcast over radio stations. No?

Albert

Han Enderman kindly sends the following images





and writes, "The last Victor main series issue with VTMC label known to me is: Vic 22411 (Ted Weems), recorded 1930-04-03 and prob. released June 1930. In the race series the last known is V-38128 (Fess Williams), also released ca. June/July 1930.
<div>So it seems the RCA Vic label was first used June or July 1930.</div><div> </div><div>Slightly different label blanks on a Victor issue are rare, I think (I have one for 16996, a Christmas issue),.</div>
Thank you, Han.

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 19th, 2010, 8:00 pm #5

French Bixophile Jean Claude points out that the record label of one of his copies (one acquired recently) of "In A Merry Oldsmobile" is slightly different than the one I posted in the Bixography and the one he has had in his collection for some time.

Here is the label of Jean Claude's new copy of the record.



Here is the label in the images section of the Bixography.



Jean Claude points out that the phrase "orthophonic recording" is located above the image of Nipper in the first image, whereas the phrase is located to the left of the spindle hole in the second image shown above.

As discussed in

http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/Article ... #MerryOlds

there was only one take of the recording as a waltz.

Jean Claude writes that the edition  "orthophonic record" above the Nipper seems to be a second pressing issued some years later. Jean Claude's suggestion is compatible with what is written in

http://majesticrecord.com/labelsvictor.htm

"As the electric era kicked in Victor changed the labels once again to the "Scroll" label, which ran from 1926-1937.  The earliest variety has the catalog number on the bottom.  It would soon move to the right of the hole and the words "Orthophonic Recording" would remain left of the hole.  These words would them get moved to above the trademark (1928-29). "

Does anyone know for sure if two pressings of Goldkette's "In A Merry Oldsmobile" were made, one in 1927 and the other in 1928-29? Jean Claude thinks this would be surprising since "In My Merry Oldsmobile"  is a "special record" commissioned by General Motors for the 1927 convention in Detroit.

Jean Claude asks about the statement on the label "For Private Use Only." My guess is that it was not supposed to be sold commercially in stores nor to be broadcast over radio stations. No?

Albert

Nick kindly sends the following images.







and writes, "Attached are photos of the centre part of test pressings of the issued take of "In My Merry Oldsmobile" (black) and unissued take (white label). The writing is easier to see on the black image; this writing would have been shaved off before the labels were applied (on the issued take). The subject of the "writing under the label" was raised in several of the emails to which Emrah provides links to."
<div>Thank you, Nick.</div>
Albert
Last edited by ahaim on April 19th, 2010, 8:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Mike
Mike

April 20th, 2010, 10:17 am #6

French Bixophile Jean Claude points out that the record label of one of his copies (one acquired recently) of "In A Merry Oldsmobile" is slightly different than the one I posted in the Bixography and the one he has had in his collection for some time.

Here is the label of Jean Claude's new copy of the record.



Here is the label in the images section of the Bixography.



Jean Claude points out that the phrase "orthophonic recording" is located above the image of Nipper in the first image, whereas the phrase is located to the left of the spindle hole in the second image shown above.

As discussed in

http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/Article ... #MerryOlds

there was only one take of the recording as a waltz.

Jean Claude writes that the edition  "orthophonic record" above the Nipper seems to be a second pressing issued some years later. Jean Claude's suggestion is compatible with what is written in

http://majesticrecord.com/labelsvictor.htm

"As the electric era kicked in Victor changed the labels once again to the "Scroll" label, which ran from 1926-1937.  The earliest variety has the catalog number on the bottom.  It would soon move to the right of the hole and the words "Orthophonic Recording" would remain left of the hole.  These words would them get moved to above the trademark (1928-29). "

Does anyone know for sure if two pressings of Goldkette's "In A Merry Oldsmobile" were made, one in 1927 and the other in 1928-29? Jean Claude thinks this would be surprising since "In My Merry Oldsmobile"  is a "special record" commissioned by General Motors for the 1927 convention in Detroit.

Jean Claude asks about the statement on the label "For Private Use Only." My guess is that it was not supposed to be sold commercially in stores nor to be broadcast over radio stations. No?

Albert

If RCA Victor did in fact reissue this record (perhaps at a later Detroit auto convention) perhaps that would explain why collectors have occasionally noted that it is easier to find copies of "Merry Oldsmobile" than "Proud Of A Baby Like You" (Vic 20469). Curiously, "Oldsmobile" still sells for top dollar, while "Proud" (when/if you can find it) usually sells for much less.

- Mike
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 20th, 2010, 9:46 pm #7

Jean Claude Laval and Han Enderman sent scans of the Fox-trot version of "In My Merry Oldsmobile."





As you can see (and pointed out by Brad a while ago), the labels show RCA Victor, indicating a later printing. What is particularly interesting is that the reverse, the waltz version, gives Victor Talking Machine Co., not RCA Victor Company. On one particular record, two labels, one side from 1928-early 1929 and the other post-March 1929, when Radio Corporation of America purchased Victor. Are there other examples of Victor records displaying labels with "Victor Talking Machine" on one side and "RCA Victor Company" on the other?

Thanks to Jean-Claude and Han for their generosity in providing the scans.

Albert
Rob kindly sends this image of the label with the Victor Talking Machine phrase at the bottom. You can also see the matrix number.



Thanks, Rob.

Albert


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