Happy Birthday, Satchmo!!

Happy Birthday, Satchmo!!

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 4th, 2010, 12:23 pm #1


Listen to the WKCR tribute.

Real Audio Stream http://kanga.college.columbia.edu/ramge ... st/wkcr.rm

mp3 stream kanga.college.columbia.edu:8000/listen.pls

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 4th, 2010, 12:25 pm #2


.... you can hear "I Can't Believe That You Are In Love With Me." Great version, but I admit I prefer Roger Wolfe Kahn's version.

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on August 4th, 2010, 5:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Emrah Erken
Emrah Erken

August 4th, 2010, 1:08 pm #3

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 4th, 2010, 2:57 pm #4

Listen to the WKCR tribute.

Real Audio Stream http://kanga.college.columbia.edu/ramge ... st/wkcr.rm

mp3 stream kanga.college.columbia.edu:8000/listen.pls

Albert
Phil Pospychala wrote a few days ago, "Rich Johnson's book about Bix and Davenport has a curious King Oliver news story on page 273... The story is from March 5, 1925 and refers to Oliver at the Coliseum.  She said the Davenport Democrat (or, Democrat-Leader) was referenced.  Something puzzles me about this article and reference."

Inspired by Phil's questions, I did a bit of poking around in Davenport newspapers.

There are two items about King Oliver in p. 273 of "Bix: The Davenport Album." One is an article ascribed to Mar 5, 1925. There is a minor error in the reference. The article is from 1924. Here it is from the Davenport Democrat and Leader, Mar 5, 1924..



The article mentions an appearance at the Coliseum on Mar 4, 1924 and a return on Mar 9, 1924.

Here is the early warning announcement of the Mar 4 concert. This is from Feb 26, 1924.



Here is the ad for the Mar 4, 1924 concert from the Davenport Democrat and Leader of Feb 26, 1924.



Here is another ad for the Mar 4 concert from the Davenport Democrat and Leader of Mar 3, 1924.



Here is another article for the Mar 4, 1924 concert from the Davenport Democrat and Leader of  Mar 2, 1924.



Louis Armstrong was with King Oliver in 1924 up to June 1924. Unless he did not go with the band to Davenport, Louis would have been in the Coliseum on Mar 4 and Mar 9, 1924.

But here is what probably puzzled Phil. In the other item about King Oliver in "The Davenport Album," p. 273, there is a photo of King Oliver Creole Jazz Band, (no reference given) and the musicians are identified as follows (left to right):

Ram Hall, Honore Dufrey, Joe "King Oliver, Lil Hardin, David Jones, Johnny Dodds, Jimmie Palao, and Ed Garland.

These are not the musicians in the Creole band of 1923 (or probably 1924). It turns out that this is a photo of the 1921 edition of King Oliver Creole Jazz Band. See



The names on the right hand side of the photo are exactly the same as the names given in "The Davenport Album."

There is an ad in the Davenport Democrat and Leader of Mar 9, 1924 concert by the Creole Band. Here is a transcription.
<font face="Times New Roman" size="2"></font><p align="left">BACK AGAINDANCING TONIGHT
[size=300]<font face="Times New Roman" size="7">[/size]</font><p align="left">KING OLIVER and his
<p align="left">Original Creole JAZZ BAND
<font face="Times New Roman" size="6"></font><p align="left">| COLISEUM
<font face="Times New Roman" size="6">Sunday, Mar. 9th</font><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font><p align="left">One Night Only Don't Miss This!
<font face="Times New Roman" size="2"></font><p align="left">Admission $1.00 Per Couple, Extra Lady 35c, Including Tax
<font face="Times New Roman" size="1"></font>
Coming, Dell Lampe and Chicago Trianon Orchestra, March 17 and 18

Finally, I note that the 1921 Creole band, unlike the 1823 band that made the Gennett recordings includes a violin and a string bass (with bow) and that there were 2000 jazz fanatics in Davenport in 1924.

I think Phil's questions have been answered. It was fun to go through the detective work, at least for me.

Albert

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 4th, 2010, 3:27 pm #5


Davenport, IA Mar 4 and 9, Coliseum.

Cedar Rapids, IA Mar 6, Auditorium. (Gents 85 c, ladies 25 c).  I wonder if this is the same as the Shrine Auditorium where Bix with Whiteman appeared on Nov 22, 1928.

Madison, WI, Mar 11 and 12, Boyd Studio. From the Mar 10, 1924 issue of the Wisconsin State Journal, <em>"King Oliver himself has been recognized as the the teacher of jazz cornet playing and it is interesting to know that he has been copied by more cornet players than any other single individual."</em><font face="Times New Roman" size="1"></font>
<p align="left">Albert

 
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Alberta
Alberta

August 4th, 2010, 8:36 pm #6

I love that ragtime-influenced beat of the early 20s, and love the sound of the tuba bass. Thanks for this!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 4th, 2010, 9:00 pm #7

Davenport, IA Mar 4 and 9, Coliseum.

Cedar Rapids, IA Mar 6, Auditorium. (Gents 85 c, ladies 25 c).  I wonder if this is the same as the Shrine Auditorium where Bix with Whiteman appeared on Nov 22, 1928.

Madison, WI, Mar 11 and 12, Boyd Studio. From the Mar 10, 1924 issue of the Wisconsin State Journal, <em>"King Oliver himself has been recognized as the the teacher of jazz cornet playing and it is interesting to know that he has been copied by more cornet players than any other single individual."</em><font face="Times New Roman" size="1"></font>
<p align="left">Albert

 
I would suggest Tommy Ladnier, Paul Mares, Muggsy Spanier and, of course, Louis Armstrong. Others?

How about the cornetist in "Galion Stomp" by Lovie Austin and Her Blues Serenaders? Listen, excellent recording

http://bixography.com/GalionStompLovieAustin.ram    (This comes from the current edition of Rapidly Rotating Records).

According to Rust

Chicago August 1926 unknown c, Kid Ory, tb; Johnny Dodds, cl; Lovie Austin, p; Eustern Woodfork, bj; W. E. Burton, d.

According to Lord the cornetist is Shirley Clay and the trombonist is Albert Wynn.

Does anyone know if Lord is right about the cornetist? How about the trombonist? Ory or Wynn? Is there a drummer?

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on August 6th, 2010, 8:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 4th, 2010, 11:09 pm #8

Listen to the WKCR tribute.

Real Audio Stream http://kanga.college.columbia.edu/ramge ... st/wkcr.rm

mp3 stream kanga.college.columbia.edu:8000/listen.pls

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 5th, 2010, 2:47 pm #9

I would suggest Tommy Ladnier, Paul Mares, Muggsy Spanier and, of course, Louis Armstrong. Others?

How about the cornetist in "Galion Stomp" by Lovie Austin and Her Blues Serenaders? Listen, excellent recording

http://bixography.com/GalionStompLovieAustin.ram    (This comes from the current edition of Rapidly Rotating Records).

According to Rust

Chicago August 1926 unknown c, Kid Ory, tb; Johnny Dodds, cl; Lovie Austin, p; Eustern Woodfork, bj; W. E. Burton, d.

According to Lord the cornetist is Shirley Clay and the trombonist is Albert Wynn.

Does anyone know if Lord is right about the cornetist? How about the trombonist? Ory or Wynn? Is there a drummer?

Albert
Although the name would appear to be that of a female, Shirley Clay was a male cornetist.

From Oxford Music Online

"b <span class="BP">Charleston, MO</span>, <span class="BD">1902</span>; d <span class="DP">New York</span>, <span class="DD">7 Feb 1951</span>). <span class="NAT">American</span> <span class="OCC">trumpeter</span>. He worked with bands in and around St. Louis from 1920, and after touring with the Synco Jazzers, led by John Williams (i) (c19234), settled in Chicago. From 1926 he recorded regularly with groups led by Richard M. Jones. In 1927 he played with Carroll Dickerson and briefly with Louis Armstrong, and the following year he worked in a big band led by the clarinetist Clifford King, though he continued to record as a freelance. From 1929 to 1931 he performed and made recordings with Earl Hines. Clay worked with Don Redman from August 1932 until November 1936, during which time he also recorded with other leaders, including Benny Goodman and Ben Pollack (both 1933) and Putney Dandridge (1935); he may be seen in the short film <em>Don Redman and his Orchestra</em> (1934). Following a period with Claude Hopkins (1937) he worked with Hines again (1940), Leon Abbey, Horace Henderson (in Charleston, South Carolina, late 1941 early 1942), and Cootie Williams (1942). From 1944 until his death he often led his own bands (in the late 1940s as a co-leader with Edgar Battle), though he also worked with Hopkins once more (1944) and in Harry Dials quartet; late in 1949 he joined Manzie Johnsons band." [Addendum: Clay also recorded with Ethel Waters in the late 1930s.]

One of the Betty Boop cartoons with Don Redman is "I've Heard." You can see Don Redman's band before the cartoon begins. Shirley Clay is supposed to be in the band. Watch a terrific combination of great music and highly imaginative cartoons,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-3jUhjjcDs

Albert

 
Last edited by ahaim on August 5th, 2010, 3:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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alex revell
alex revell

August 5th, 2010, 3:37 pm #10

I would suggest Tommy Ladnier, Paul Mares, Muggsy Spanier and, of course, Louis Armstrong. Others?

How about the cornetist in "Galion Stomp" by Lovie Austin and Her Blues Serenaders? Listen, excellent recording

http://bixography.com/GalionStompLovieAustin.ram    (This comes from the current edition of Rapidly Rotating Records).

According to Rust

Chicago August 1926 unknown c, Kid Ory, tb; Johnny Dodds, cl; Lovie Austin, p; Eustern Woodfork, bj; W. E. Burton, d.

According to Lord the cornetist is Shirley Clay and the trombonist is Albert Wynn.

Does anyone know if Lord is right about the cornetist? How about the trombonist? Ory or Wynn? Is there a drummer?

Albert
Imnsho. It's the superb Tommy Ladnier.No doubt.
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