Happy Birthday, Miff Mole. My favorite trombonist.

Happy Birthday, Miff Mole. My favorite trombonist.

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 11th, 2017, 2:36 pm #1

Miff and Bix made three recordings together.
Bix Beiderbecke (cnt) Miff Mole (tb) Frankie Trumbauer (c-mel) Rube Bloom (p) Min Leibrook (tu) Vic Moore (d)
New York, October 10, 1924
9119-A Flock o' blues Gen 5569
9120-C I'm glad Gen 5569
Three Wolverine and three Ray Miller musicians.
Although many discographies list Bill Rank as the trombonist in Singin' the Blues, it was actually Miff.
I believe this is Miff's longest solo on record. Slippin' Around his own composition.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XLxIywJypM

Albert
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David Tenner
David Tenner

March 11th, 2017, 5:44 pm #2

The 1927 version with the Red Heads: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXzSAVF1GpI

1940 from "Jam Session at Commodore": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SSUnWByZJw (solo starting around 5:29)

Good as Mole is in 1927, Mole's solo in the 1940 version is, as Richard Sudhalter writes (*Lost Chords*, p. 126) "a solo of--literally--breathtaking rhythmic complexity. It is almost a cadenza over a steady pulse, so unrestrained are its phrases by beat or bar line." Sudhalter suggests that the change in Mole's style may reflect the influence of Teagarden.

(BTW, there is one of those never-ending "Pee Wee or Fud?" discographical disputes about the 1927 recording. Hilbert and Niven in *Pee Wee Speaks,* p. 9 give Pee Wee Russell as the clarinetist; Rust says it's Livingston...)
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 11th, 2017, 10:05 pm #3

Miff and Bix made three recordings together.
Bix Beiderbecke (cnt) Miff Mole (tb) Frankie Trumbauer (c-mel) Rube Bloom (p) Min Leibrook (tu) Vic Moore (d)
New York, October 10, 1924
9119-A Flock o' blues Gen 5569
9120-C I'm glad Gen 5569
Three Wolverine and three Ray Miller musicians.
Although many discographies list Bill Rank as the trombonist in Singin' the Blues, it was actually Miff.
I believe this is Miff's longest solo on record. Slippin' Around his own composition.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XLxIywJypM

Albert
Frank van Nus writes: "I saw your Miff Mole birthday post, and I thought the attached might be an appropriate addition to the tributes; it's a partial transcription I did a few years back of one of Mole's more spectacular solo sprees."



The vital statistics:
Red Nichols (cnt) Miff Mole (tb) Jimmy Dorsey (cl,as) Fred Morrow (as) Arthur Schutt (p) Vic Berton (d)
New York, January 4, 1927
143262-3 Boneyard shuffle Har 332-H Velvet 1332

The sound file:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94TmTswU59Y

Thanks, Frank.

Albert

PS Is it my imagination or do I hear a few notes of Waiting at the End of the Road at 1:26?
Last edited by ahaim on March 11th, 2017, 11:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Frank van Nus
Frank van Nus

March 12th, 2017, 4:22 am #4


Albert, you correctly identified similarities between "Boneyard Shuffle" and "Waiting At The End". The (almost unbearably) technical explanation is that in both songs the bridge drops from the tonic to the submediant, then moves to its secondary dominant chord - and back. In plain English: for four bars, the chord progression is identical!

Frank
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