Gennett Digital Archives

Gennett Digital Archives

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 25th, 2010, 9:22 pm #1

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Michael May
Michael May

June 26th, 2010, 2:04 am #2

Are these delicious files to be made available online?

On a slightly related note, I remember reading on the 78-l last year, that Sony-BMG was making 10,000 soundfiles available to the Library of Congress. The files were from the 1900-1925 time period, and they would be offered as free downloads. Does anyone know anything about this?

Thank you in advance! Have a nice weekend!


Mike
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 26th, 2010, 1:03 pm #3


I wrote to Teri and asked him about the availability of the Gennett digital files on line. Cross your fingers.

Here is a link to the 25 collections of sound recordings of the Library of Congress.

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/browse/List ... +Recording

I do not see a mention of SONY BMG.

Since I was on the page, I explored a bit what they have. Below are some interesting excerpts.

Albert

NAME OF INFORMANT Arnold Freeman (Bud's brother)

<em>He [Teschmacher] was a very frustrated guy, like Bix Beiderbecke, and you could sometimes feel what a frustrated guy he was in his instrument. And it wasn't sax frustration. Maybe it came because he knew so much more about music than the others. Maybe he wanted to get at the impossible like Bix and he went nuts trying.</em>

<em>At the time the original bunch [the Austin Gang] was influenced by the records of King Oliver, McKenzie's Mound City Blue Blowers, Frankie Trambauer, and the Wolverines with Bix Beiderbecke. They used to go to the Spoon and Straw, a little ice cream parlor where most of the high school kids would congregate, and listen to those records. That was their only way then of knowing what good jazz was. The big white band at the time was Dick Voynow's (piano) Wolverines. And in that band was Bix. He became the greatest influence at the time.</em>

<em>Then they started to hit the night spots on the south side. There was a club there then called the Apex. There the great Bessie Smith sang; <strong>Joe Smith, who influenced Bix a lot</strong>, [</em>comments?]<em> played trumpet; and don't ask what boogie woogie is but they had a guitar player, Saint Cyr, who played that way. He was terrific. They also went to the Sunset club where they heard Armstrong, Earl Hines, and Carol Dickerson.</em>

<em>After that they played at the White City ballroom and there Milt Mezzrow came in on sax. They were all about twenty one years old then. Beiderbecke had heard about a kid band that was knocking them dead at White City and he came in once from Hudson Lake with Trambauer [sic], where they were performing, to hear them. He stood listening to these crazy kids blowing their [heads?] off with his eyes and mouth wide open. The gang was thrilled knowing that Bix came down specially to hear them.</em>

NAME OF INFORMANT George Barnes (guitarist, I believe recorded with Venuti, I have an old LP with Barnes and Venuti, as far as I can remember)

<em>There were no real swing musicians in that band then. I liked swing. I always liked it even when I didn't know what it was. I felt it like this. I knew Guy Lombardo was bad. But I didn't know what swing really was until I heard Bix Beiderbecke on records. He has been my big influence. I don't think anybody playing today has not been influenced by Bix. I understand he was a great guy, everybody who ever worked with him thought he was great. Even though I don't approve of a lot of things he done, like smoking weed and doing goofy things, he was still great. Well, listening to Bix and others on records were my only influences. You know I never heard any guitar solos until a year ago. I liked to hear Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman. I don't know how I missed up on guitar solos I enjoy them so much now. We have some records of Segovia, you know, the classical guitar player. He's great. Anyhow guys like Goodman and Dorsey and Coleman Hawkins never change. They were good when I first heard them and they are just as good now. Their kind of music sort of lasts. Funny I never benefited by Armstrong and Hodges. They play different music. It's not that mine has more notes in the improvisation, but Armstrong's attack and expression is a different thing. It's jagged when it comes to delicacy and terrific when it comes to feeling. I think the trouble is he isn't satisfied to play good music. You feel he tries to make great music. Therefore he's not always good. Teddy Wilson plays a delicate piano and when he does play gut bucket it's a different kind. And when Wilson plays 'lightly and politely' as Armstrong would call it he is tops. Anyhow all the stuff I got that amounts to anything I got from those records.</em>

NAME OF INFORMANT Muggsy Spanier

<em>I met Bix at the Friar's Inn where the New Orleans Rhythm Kings were and we both came down to listen to them. We met in a funny way, sort of unconscious. We'd sit around and listen to the boys and then one day Bix said, "I'm a cornet player." And I said, "I'm one, too." After that we went out to the south side together and there was one place we dropped in at where there was a piano and a drum and we sat in with our two horns and we played together so well we decided we'd be a cornet team Always we met at Friar's Inn and then we'd knock around together.</em>

<em>Tesch was about 19 then. He was a quiet guy, a wonderful guy, never talked much unless he got a coupla drinks in him. He was a funny guy though. If the band didn't play exactly right he couldn't play. The band had to be perfect.</em>

<em>We used to make our own arrangements. We never jammed. I never went in for that stuff, jam, bringing your instrument around to another spot and sitting in and jamming. We do that ourselves though. We'd go to one of the fellows houses and have our own fun, singing the blues and playin' them. Tesch and I had a favorite place we liked to go to on 10th and Wabash, a wine place. he'd drink our wine then we'd go out and listen to guys like Jimmy Noone and all that. Tesch really had an original style. I can't describe his style. I just liked him. He could real swing. You know. His favorites were Rappollo, Noone, and Johny Dodds.</em>
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John Rowland
John Rowland

June 26th, 2010, 6:23 pm #5

Are these delicious files to be made available online?

On a slightly related note, I remember reading on the 78-l last year, that Sony-BMG was making 10,000 soundfiles available to the Library of Congress. The files were from the 1900-1925 time period, and they would be offered as free downloads. Does anyone know anything about this?

Thank you in advance! Have a nice weekend!


Mike
I don't know if it is somehow related, but Sony-BMG has been removing some of the Bix tunes Emrah posted on youtube claiming copyright violations. This really bums me out since I don't own any of those recordings and that was the only way I could listen to them. "Goose Pimples," Emrah's metal master of "For No Reason At All in C," "Sorry," "At the Jazz Band Ball," and "Royal Garden Blues" are among the victims, but this is by no means a complete list.
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Jon Pytko
Jon Pytko

June 27th, 2010, 7:21 pm #6

Perhaps one of our legal experts can clarify this, but if owns the metal master, where does BMG come in? Is it that post-1923 rule/law? Sorry for how elementary this sounds...
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 27th, 2010, 8:38 pm #7

I don't know if it is somehow related, but Sony-BMG has been removing some of the Bix tunes Emrah posted on youtube claiming copyright violations. This really bums me out since I don't own any of those recordings and that was the only way I could listen to them. "Goose Pimples," Emrah's metal master of "For No Reason At All in C," "Sorry," "At the Jazz Band Ball," and "Royal Garden Blues" are among the victims, but this is by no means a complete list.
.... Bix and His Gang and Bix and Tram recordings are available in

http://www.redhotjazz.com/

http://www.archive.org/<a href=""></a>

http://www.jazz-on-line.com/index.htm

Albert
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alex revell
alex revell

June 28th, 2010, 9:38 am #8

I wrote to Teri and asked him about the availability of the Gennett digital files on line. Cross your fingers.

Here is a link to the 25 collections of sound recordings of the Library of Congress.

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/browse/List ... +Recording

I do not see a mention of SONY BMG.

Since I was on the page, I explored a bit what they have. Below are some interesting excerpts.

Albert

NAME OF INFORMANT Arnold Freeman (Bud's brother)

<em>He [Teschmacher] was a very frustrated guy, like Bix Beiderbecke, and you could sometimes feel what a frustrated guy he was in his instrument. And it wasn't sax frustration. Maybe it came because he knew so much more about music than the others. Maybe he wanted to get at the impossible like Bix and he went nuts trying.</em>

<em>At the time the original bunch [the Austin Gang] was influenced by the records of King Oliver, McKenzie's Mound City Blue Blowers, Frankie Trambauer, and the Wolverines with Bix Beiderbecke. They used to go to the Spoon and Straw, a little ice cream parlor where most of the high school kids would congregate, and listen to those records. That was their only way then of knowing what good jazz was. The big white band at the time was Dick Voynow's (piano) Wolverines. And in that band was Bix. He became the greatest influence at the time.</em>

<em>Then they started to hit the night spots on the south side. There was a club there then called the Apex. There the great Bessie Smith sang; <strong>Joe Smith, who influenced Bix a lot</strong>, [</em>comments?]<em> played trumpet; and don't ask what boogie woogie is but they had a guitar player, Saint Cyr, who played that way. He was terrific. They also went to the Sunset club where they heard Armstrong, Earl Hines, and Carol Dickerson.</em>

<em>After that they played at the White City ballroom and there Milt Mezzrow came in on sax. They were all about twenty one years old then. Beiderbecke had heard about a kid band that was knocking them dead at White City and he came in once from Hudson Lake with Trambauer [sic], where they were performing, to hear them. He stood listening to these crazy kids blowing their [heads?] off with his eyes and mouth wide open. The gang was thrilled knowing that Bix came down specially to hear them.</em>

NAME OF INFORMANT George Barnes (guitarist, I believe recorded with Venuti, I have an old LP with Barnes and Venuti, as far as I can remember)

<em>There were no real swing musicians in that band then. I liked swing. I always liked it even when I didn't know what it was. I felt it like this. I knew Guy Lombardo was bad. But I didn't know what swing really was until I heard Bix Beiderbecke on records. He has been my big influence. I don't think anybody playing today has not been influenced by Bix. I understand he was a great guy, everybody who ever worked with him thought he was great. Even though I don't approve of a lot of things he done, like smoking weed and doing goofy things, he was still great. Well, listening to Bix and others on records were my only influences. You know I never heard any guitar solos until a year ago. I liked to hear Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman. I don't know how I missed up on guitar solos I enjoy them so much now. We have some records of Segovia, you know, the classical guitar player. He's great. Anyhow guys like Goodman and Dorsey and Coleman Hawkins never change. They were good when I first heard them and they are just as good now. Their kind of music sort of lasts. Funny I never benefited by Armstrong and Hodges. They play different music. It's not that mine has more notes in the improvisation, but Armstrong's attack and expression is a different thing. It's jagged when it comes to delicacy and terrific when it comes to feeling. I think the trouble is he isn't satisfied to play good music. You feel he tries to make great music. Therefore he's not always good. Teddy Wilson plays a delicate piano and when he does play gut bucket it's a different kind. And when Wilson plays 'lightly and politely' as Armstrong would call it he is tops. Anyhow all the stuff I got that amounts to anything I got from those records.</em>

NAME OF INFORMANT Muggsy Spanier

<em>I met Bix at the Friar's Inn where the New Orleans Rhythm Kings were and we both came down to listen to them. We met in a funny way, sort of unconscious. We'd sit around and listen to the boys and then one day Bix said, "I'm a cornet player." And I said, "I'm one, too." After that we went out to the south side together and there was one place we dropped in at where there was a piano and a drum and we sat in with our two horns and we played together so well we decided we'd be a cornet team Always we met at Friar's Inn and then we'd knock around together.</em>

<em>Tesch was about 19 then. He was a quiet guy, a wonderful guy, never talked much unless he got a coupla drinks in him. He was a funny guy though. If the band didn't play exactly right he couldn't play. The band had to be perfect.</em>

<em>We used to make our own arrangements. We never jammed. I never went in for that stuff, jam, bringing your instrument around to another spot and sitting in and jamming. We do that ourselves though. We'd go to one of the fellows houses and have our own fun, singing the blues and playin' them. Tesch and I had a favorite place we liked to go to on 10th and Wabash, a wine place. he'd drink our wine then we'd go out and listen to guys like Jimmy Noone and all that. Tesch really had an original style. I can't describe his style. I just liked him. He could real swing. You know. His favorites were Rappollo, Noone, and Johny Dodds.</em>
What good taste Tesch had in clarinet players.
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carl
carl

June 29th, 2010, 7:38 am #9

When I saw Alex Revell posting on this thread I jumped on it first cause I thought he was getting in on that Joe Smith statement, as he had said a few years back he thought Smith had been influenced by Bix instead, and if I remember right, even felt that Bix might not have even heard Joe in his formative years, which I can't see, it wan't the dark ages. But alas, no more Joe the Fox from Alex, just dumb old Tesch. I think Albert said he didn't see any resemblance, just me and Linda did. I used to think it was a given that Joe was Bix' biggest influence, maybe now I'm not so sure, though I'll never believe that Joe wasn't Bix' favourite trumpet. They both had that philosophy that their sound had to be like being in church, you move people, you fill them with wonder, you make your magic first of all with with righteous glorious sound. Your message in the medium. Surely not even Albert can deny, when Bix was getting old and drunk, and all the ideas weren't barraging and disturbing him so much any more, he threw himself Joe's way, the simplest phrases, the single notes all laden with beauty and feeling. Meanwhile poor old Joe was turning to sugar. I gotta go hear some Georgia.
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