From the Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio Archives: The Music of Paul Whiteman

From the Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio Archives: The Music of Paul Whiteman

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 13th, 2012, 11:53 am #1


http://jalc.org/jazzcast/archive_RMplay ... Number=221

<em>Broadcast date:April 26, 2007
The hugely popular big band leader of the 20's, Paul Whiteman, crowned himself the "King of Jazz." He hired the best musicians to work for him - George Gershwin, Don Redman, and Duke Ellington. Wynton Marsalis and The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra showcase classic Redman arrangements such as "Stampede" and "I'd Love It." Special guests include Bob Wilbur, Daryl Sherman, and Vince Giordano.</em>

Not true, Paul did not crown himself the "King of Jazz." From my Whiteman piece on WWI Registration cards for the Doctor Jazz website:

http://www.doctorjazz.co.uk/draftcards4.html

<strong>Whiteman did not confer the title of King of Jazz upon himself, as commonly stated. In fact, he did not like the sobriquet. The first mention was in 1919, in the Pasadena Evening Post, . . . the friends of Mr. Whiteman have with much enthusiasm bestowed the title of king of jazz upon him.</strong>

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 13th, 2012, 11:59 am #2

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 14th, 2012, 3:45 pm #3

http://jalc.org/jazzcast/archive_RMplay ... Number=221

<em>Broadcast date:April 26, 2007
The hugely popular big band leader of the 20's, Paul Whiteman, crowned himself the "King of Jazz." He hired the best musicians to work for him - George Gershwin, Don Redman, and Duke Ellington. Wynton Marsalis and The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra showcase classic Redman arrangements such as "Stampede" and "I'd Love It." Special guests include Bob Wilbur, Daryl Sherman, and Vince Giordano.</em>

Not true, Paul did not crown himself the "King of Jazz." From my Whiteman piece on WWI Registration cards for the Doctor Jazz website:

http://www.doctorjazz.co.uk/draftcards4.html

<strong>Whiteman did not confer the title of King of Jazz upon himself, as commonly stated. In fact, he did not like the sobriquet. The first mention was in 1919, in the Pasadena Evening Post, . . . the friends of Mr. Whiteman have with much enthusiasm bestowed the title of king of jazz upon him.</strong>

Albert
http://grossmanproject.net/jacob_and_ch ... ossman.htm

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on May 14th, 2012, 5:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 14th, 2012, 5:38 pm #4


Thanks to Nick's generosity, here is a fragment of the conversation.

bixbeiderbecke.com/MargulisChallis.mp3

Margulis died on Apr 24, 1967, so this is pre-1967. I guess that the Mat Bill and Charlie were talking about was Matty Malneck?

Albert
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David Sager
David Sager

May 14th, 2012, 5:49 pm #5

I think they are saying "Nat" as in Shilkret. It could also mean Nat Brusiloff (Uncle Nat)who was very active as a radio conductor.

Let's hear more!!

DS
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

May 14th, 2012, 8:48 pm #6


The "Nat" is Nat Shilkret. This is part of Bob Mantler's taped interview of Nat Shilkret, Bill Challis and Andy Sannella conducted in 1961.

To be perfectly honest, despite the interview stretching over four hours in total, it produced relatively little of significance. Mantler doesn't ask a single question about Bix, spends a considerable amount of time playing (and re-playing) very straight Shilkret sides, and often disagrees with his interviewees! It seems to me that this was a classic case of a wasted opportunity.

By the way David, Sylvester Ahola told me some very funny stories about Nat Brusiloff, who seems to have been something of a practical joker a la Venuti! I have these stories on tape, but could relate one or two of them here if you and Albert would like me to do so. Hooley worked for him at NBC in the 1930s.

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 14th, 2012, 8:52 pm #7

http://jalc.org/jazzcast/archive_RMplay ... Number=221

<em>Broadcast date:April 26, 2007
The hugely popular big band leader of the 20's, Paul Whiteman, crowned himself the "King of Jazz." He hired the best musicians to work for him - George Gershwin, Don Redman, and Duke Ellington. Wynton Marsalis and The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra showcase classic Redman arrangements such as "Stampede" and "I'd Love It." Special guests include Bob Wilbur, Daryl Sherman, and Vince Giordano.</em>

Not true, Paul did not crown himself the "King of Jazz." From my Whiteman piece on WWI Registration cards for the Doctor Jazz website:

http://www.doctorjazz.co.uk/draftcards4.html

<strong>Whiteman did not confer the title of King of Jazz upon himself, as commonly stated. In fact, he did not like the sobriquet. The first mention was in 1919, in the Pasadena Evening Post, . . . the friends of Mr. Whiteman have with much enthusiasm bestowed the title of king of jazz upon him.</strong>

Albert
<div>Cigarette Cards/Dance Band Leaders: Arents Cigarette Cards 619 </div><div> </div><div> </div><div><img border="0" alt="Paul Whiteman." src="http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1517587&t=w"> </div><div> </div><div><div><img border="0" alt="Paul Whiteman." src="http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1517588&t=w"> </div><div> </div><div>Lancashire-born? Paul was born in Denver CO. The aprt about Colonel is correct. From Wikipedia </div><div> </div><div><em>"Kentucky colonel is the highest </em><em>title of honor</em><em> bestowed by the </em><em>Commonwealth of Kentucky</em><em>. Commissions for Kentucky colonels are given by the </em><em>Governor</em><em> and the </em><em>Secretary of State</em><em> to individuals in recognition of noteworthy accomplishments and outstanding service to a community, state or the nation. The sitting </em><em>governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky</em><em> bestows the honor of a colonel's </em><em>Commission</em><em>, by issuance of </em><em>letters patent</em><em>."</em></div><div><em></em> </div><div>Albert</div></div>
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 14th, 2012, 9:07 pm #8

The "Nat" is Nat Shilkret. This is part of Bob Mantler's taped interview of Nat Shilkret, Bill Challis and Andy Sannella conducted in 1961.

To be perfectly honest, despite the interview stretching over four hours in total, it produced relatively little of significance. Mantler doesn't ask a single question about Bix, spends a considerable amount of time playing (and re-playing) very straight Shilkret sides, and often disagrees with his interviewees! It seems to me that this was a classic case of a wasted opportunity.

By the way David, Sylvester Ahola told me some very funny stories about Nat Brusiloff, who seems to have been something of a practical joker a la Venuti! I have these stories on tape, but could relate one or two of them here if you and Albert would like me to do so. Hooley worked for him at NBC in the 1930s.
Anything about the great Hooley is fascinating to me.

In his autobiography, Nat Shilkret mentions Bill Challis several times, mostly briefly. Here is one fascinating glimpse.

<em>Even in the late 1960s (Nat Shilkret was in his seventies at the time) he [Nat] visited the arrnager Bill Challis in Massapequa (on Long Island) for lessosn. He always had a high opinion of Challis's work.</em>

<em>Albert</em>

 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 14th, 2012, 10:04 pm #9

<div>Cigarette Cards/Dance Band Leaders: Arents Cigarette Cards 619 </div><div> </div><div> </div><div><img border="0" alt="Paul Whiteman." src="http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1517587&t=w"> </div><div> </div><div><div><img border="0" alt="Paul Whiteman." src="http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1517588&t=w"> </div><div> </div><div>Lancashire-born? Paul was born in Denver CO. The aprt about Colonel is correct. From Wikipedia </div><div> </div><div><em>"Kentucky colonel is the highest </em><em>title of honor</em><em> bestowed by the </em><em>Commonwealth of Kentucky</em><em>. Commissions for Kentucky colonels are given by the </em><em>Governor</em><em> and the </em><em>Secretary of State</em><em> to individuals in recognition of noteworthy accomplishments and outstanding service to a community, state or the nation. The sitting </em><em>governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky</em><em> bestows the honor of a colonel's </em><em>Commission</em><em>, by issuance of </em><em>letters patent</em><em>."</em></div><div><em></em> </div><div>Albert</div></div>
Here are the Lambert and Butler cards in the collection. Not surprising that several of the artists are British.  <div class="prop"></div>
<img border="0" alt="Ambrose." src="http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1517541&t=t"> 

Ambrose. 


<img border="0" alt="Cab Calloway." src="http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1517543&t=t">
Cab Calloway.  Billy Cotton.  Duke Ellington. <div class="clearrow"></div><div class="newrow"></div> Roy Fox.  Geraldo.  Carroll Gibbons. Nat Gonella. <div class="clearrow"></div><div class="newrow"></div> Henry Hall.  Jack Hylton.  Jack Jackson.  Charlie Kunz.<div class="clearrow"></div><div class="newrow"></div> Sydney Kyte. Brian Lawrence.  Syd. Lipton.  Joe Loss. <div class="clearrow"></div><div class="newrow"></div> Ray Noble.  Jack Payne. Lou Preager. Harry Roy. 
Albert
 

 
<div class="newrow"></div><div class="clearrow"></div>
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David Sager
David Sager

May 15th, 2012, 4:47 am #10

The "Nat" is Nat Shilkret. This is part of Bob Mantler's taped interview of Nat Shilkret, Bill Challis and Andy Sannella conducted in 1961.

To be perfectly honest, despite the interview stretching over four hours in total, it produced relatively little of significance. Mantler doesn't ask a single question about Bix, spends a considerable amount of time playing (and re-playing) very straight Shilkret sides, and often disagrees with his interviewees! It seems to me that this was a classic case of a wasted opportunity.

By the way David, Sylvester Ahola told me some very funny stories about Nat Brusiloff, who seems to have been something of a practical joker a la Venuti! I have these stories on tape, but could relate one or two of them here if you and Albert would like me to do so. Hooley worked for him at NBC in the 1930s.
Please do! I'd love to hear the tapes some time. Nat was my grandmother's brother.
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