From Laura, An Ad for Old Gold Cigarettes.

From Laura, An Ad for Old Gold Cigarettes.

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 1st, 2011, 1:31 pm #1


Thanks to Laura for her generosity in sharing this image with the Bixography forum readers. From a 1929 magazine. (Laura, I lost the details; could you please fill in? Thanks.)



The guy in the middle sitting and holding a banjo is Mike Pingitore. To his left are three guys. The guy sitting closest to Pingitore is undoubtedly Harry Goldfield. Then comes a guy holding a trombone, I would guess Rank or Fulton. Then comes the important guy.  Could it be Bix? At this time, Whiteman had four trumpet/cornet players: Margulis, Goldfield, Secrest and Bix. The guy is certainly not Margulis  nor Goldfield. Therefore, it must be Secrest or Bix. I favor Secrest. Opinions?

The guy with the trombone is probably Min Leibrook. Any ideas about the identity of the violinist? I would guess that the guy at the drums is George Marsh.

Albert
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

April 1st, 2011, 2:52 pm #2

This is from a "confessional" magazine --one full of stories slanted to middle and working class women.

the stories concern young women who have somehow been trapped in some moral indiscretion; been wooed, seduced, and betrayed by some (usually rich and educated) man, or trapped by plotting relatives into a dreadful marriage to a domineering brute. Sometimes men are the confessional "I" narrating the stories -- schoolteachers pestered by seductive high school students (uh, no real laws governing such things in those days!); teenagers drinking and running wild at roadhouses; or else a scheming rich matriarch who is a wickedly disapproving and tormenting mother-in-law to her unwanted, "lower class" daughter-in-law, usually driving her and her son to suicide.

So, you get an idea of what kind of a magazine True Story was, and is. This issue is from September 1929.

What are all you others leaning toward in that illustration? Bix, or Andy Seacrest?


Laura
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

April 1st, 2011, 2:53 pm #3

Thanks to Laura for her generosity in sharing this image with the Bixography forum readers. From a 1929 magazine. (Laura, I lost the details; could you please fill in? Thanks.)



The guy in the middle sitting and holding a banjo is Mike Pingitore. To his left are three guys. The guy sitting closest to Pingitore is undoubtedly Harry Goldfield. Then comes a guy holding a trombone, I would guess Rank or Fulton. Then comes the important guy.  Could it be Bix? At this time, Whiteman had four trumpet/cornet players: Margulis, Goldfield, Secrest and Bix. The guy is certainly not Margulis  nor Goldfield. Therefore, it must be Secrest or Bix. I favor Secrest. Opinions?

The guy with the trombone is probably Min Leibrook. Any ideas about the identity of the violinist? I would guess that the guy at the drums is George Marsh.

Albert
that really looks more like Bix to me, now that you have enlarged it, Albert.

What do you others think?

Laura
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Glenda
Glenda

April 1st, 2011, 4:21 pm #4

This is from a "confessional" magazine --one full of stories slanted to middle and working class women.

the stories concern young women who have somehow been trapped in some moral indiscretion; been wooed, seduced, and betrayed by some (usually rich and educated) man, or trapped by plotting relatives into a dreadful marriage to a domineering brute. Sometimes men are the confessional "I" narrating the stories -- schoolteachers pestered by seductive high school students (uh, no real laws governing such things in those days!); teenagers drinking and running wild at roadhouses; or else a scheming rich matriarch who is a wickedly disapproving and tormenting mother-in-law to her unwanted, "lower class" daughter-in-law, usually driving her and her son to suicide.

So, you get an idea of what kind of a magazine True Story was, and is. This issue is from September 1929.

What are all you others leaning toward in that illustration? Bix, or Andy Seacrest?


Laura
I think it's definitely Bix, just judging by the hairstyle. I have only seen one photo of Secrest, made some time after this period, so I don't have a comparison in mind.

Albert, didn't you mean it's Min Leibrook with the <em>tuba?</em>

I would guess the trombonist to be Fulton, for what that's worth.

This is a great find, Laura. Thank you.
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Malcolm Walton
Malcolm Walton

April 1st, 2011, 4:52 pm #5

Thanks to Laura for her generosity in sharing this image with the Bixography forum readers. From a 1929 magazine. (Laura, I lost the details; could you please fill in? Thanks.)



The guy in the middle sitting and holding a banjo is Mike Pingitore. To his left are three guys. The guy sitting closest to Pingitore is undoubtedly Harry Goldfield. Then comes a guy holding a trombone, I would guess Rank or Fulton. Then comes the important guy.  Could it be Bix? At this time, Whiteman had four trumpet/cornet players: Margulis, Goldfield, Secrest and Bix. The guy is certainly not Margulis  nor Goldfield. Therefore, it must be Secrest or Bix. I favor Secrest. Opinions?

The guy with the trombone is probably Min Leibrook. Any ideas about the identity of the violinist? I would guess that the guy at the drums is George Marsh.

Albert
Whoever it is, he is playing a trumpet. Bix certainly didn't, and I always thought that Secrest didn't. So, when was Eddie Pinder in the band ? Just a long shot.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 1st, 2011, 5:06 pm #6

I think it's definitely Bix, just judging by the hairstyle. I have only seen one photo of Secrest, made some time after this period, so I don't have a comparison in mind.

Albert, didn't you mean it's Min Leibrook with the <em>tuba?</em>

I would guess the trombonist to be Fulton, for what that's worth.

This is a great find, Laura. Thank you.
.... on tuba. Thanks.

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 1st, 2011, 5:11 pm #7

Whoever it is, he is playing a trumpet. Bix certainly didn't, and I always thought that Secrest didn't. So, when was Eddie Pinder in the band ? Just a long shot.
.... in March 1929. Morever, he had sparse hair. The guy in question has a full head of hair.

Albert
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

April 1st, 2011, 5:47 pm #8

Whoever it is, he is playing a trumpet. Bix certainly didn't, and I always thought that Secrest didn't. So, when was Eddie Pinder in the band ? Just a long shot.
Who is to say the artist didn't differentiate properly between a trumpet and a cornet, and just drew without accurately portraying that Andy and Bix played cornet, and not trumpet? I always thought the decorated cornet Bix had looked large, anyway.

Although, as said before, the "Whiteman band" part of the ad is not in color, but a green-tinted black and white, even looking at the original more than a difficult copy (and I did the best I could) it seemed to me the artist was trying to depict a decorated horn, but it just could be the smear of age.

Something about the shape of the profile and head just looks a little more Bix than Andy S to me.

- Laura
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Glenda
Glenda

April 1st, 2011, 10:02 pm #9

Laura, nobody mentioned the ears of the potential Bix model in the illustration, but like your supposition about the decorated horn, that ear looks like his. Admittedly, it could just be the spottiness of the shading that makes me see that unique shape.

I wonder if the artist wasn't working from a photograph, or several photos, to catch the characteristics of the players which could then be drawn wherever he or she thought best for the composition of the picture.
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Glenda
Glenda

April 1st, 2011, 10:13 pm #10

Who is to say the artist didn't differentiate properly between a trumpet and a cornet, and just drew without accurately portraying that Andy and Bix played cornet, and not trumpet? I always thought the decorated cornet Bix had looked large, anyway.

Although, as said before, the "Whiteman band" part of the ad is not in color, but a green-tinted black and white, even looking at the original more than a difficult copy (and I did the best I could) it seemed to me the artist was trying to depict a decorated horn, but it just could be the smear of age.

Something about the shape of the profile and head just looks a little more Bix than Andy S to me.

- Laura
Isn
Isn't the horn played by the "Bix" figure wound differently from that of the Harry Goldfield figure?
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