Classic Jazz Masters # 25, Red Nichols Vol 2.

Classic Jazz Masters # 25, Red Nichols Vol 2.

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 18th, 2010, 1:19 pm #1


I would be grateful for a scan of the back of the CJM 25 album. I am particualrly interested in the information provided about "My Gal Sal."

Thank you very much.

Albert 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 18th, 2010, 3:37 pm #2


From "Reminiscences of Black Musicians" by James A. Standifer, American Music, Vol. 4, No. 2 (Summer, 1986), pp. 194-205, Published by: University of Illinois Press



You can see that Roy mentions Red Nichols and Rex Stewart as his influences.

In http://www.jazz-music-history.com/Roy-Eldridge.html

"His early influences were Red Nichols, Jabbo Smith, Bix Beiderbecke and more importantly Coleman Hawkins and Benny Carter. Coleman Hawkins brought a fluid legato up-tempo style to the saxophone. While Louis Armstrong was playing a trumpet with lots of arpeggios and vertical melodies, Roy Eldridge playing in a more linear fluid style in the manner of a saxophone. Eldridge stated: "The sax players would run changes, would run through all the passing chords and things" He also said "I play nice saxophone on the trumpet"."

Red Nichols again, but also Jabbo Smith and Bix. The sax-like playing theme shows up here also.

The last point reminds me of what I have mentioned often, namely, that Bix played the cornet like a clarinet. I believe Richard Hadlock makes the same point in his excellent book "Jazz Masters of the Twenties."

Albert
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Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

February 18th, 2010, 4:00 pm #3

In the <em>Bix</em> video documentary, his old school friend Esten Spurrier remarked that Bix taught himself to play, not just the La Rocca lead, but <em>all</em> of the parts from the <em>ODJB</em> records he could get his hands on.

Perhaps that experience freed him from feeling the necessity to play a traditional cornet line.
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Linda
Linda

February 18th, 2010, 4:15 pm #4

I would be grateful for a scan of the back of the CJM 25 album. I am particualrly interested in the information provided about "My Gal Sal."

Thank you very much.

Albert 
I have that lp and here is a scan:

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 18th, 2010, 4:30 pm #5


Is the liner picture mentioned that of the record label for "My Gal Sal"? Here is the picture kindly sent by Steve H.



Is the picture the same? 

Steve, what does "cancels p.n. 356 for 3855 mean?  You mentioned that your two copies of BR 3855 with the labelof "My Gal Sal" play "Five Pennies." Are there copies of the B side of Br 3855 that in fact play "My Gal Sal"? What was the source of the "My Gal Sal" track in the album? A test pressing?

Albert
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Emrah Erken
Emrah Erken

February 18th, 2010, 4:32 pm #6

I have that lp and here is a scan:

Does anyone have it?

My favorite versions of "My Gal Sal" are the ones by Miff Mole & His Molers and Danny Altier. Last time I saw the Danny Altier record was in 2008 when it was sold for $1875! This is one of the highest prices for a jazz Vocalion ever paid (if popsike.com is complete).

http://www.popsike.com/php/detaildatar. ... 0324160732

Emrah

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Linda
Linda

February 18th, 2010, 4:52 pm #7

Is the liner picture mentioned that of the record label for "My Gal Sal"? Here is the picture kindly sent by Steve H.



Is the picture the same? 

Steve, what does "cancels p.n. 356 for 3855 mean?  You mentioned that your two copies of BR 3855 with the labelof "My Gal Sal" play "Five Pennies." Are there copies of the B side of Br 3855 that in fact play "My Gal Sal"? What was the source of the "My Gal Sal" track in the album? A test pressing?

Albert
Yes, the liner picture of the Brunswick label of My Gal Sal is on CJM 25 and is the same as the one sent by Steve Hester.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 18th, 2010, 8:38 pm #8


I wonder if the CJM 25 album is the first album where the Red Nichols and His Five Pennies version of "My Gal Sal" was first issued. I believe CJM 25 was issued in 1980. Correct? What other albums include the Five Pennies version of "My Gal Sal"? What year were they issued.

One more question about the liners in CJM 25. Is the source of the "My Gal Sal " track specified?

Thanks

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 18th, 2010, 9:45 pm #9

From "Reminiscences of Black Musicians" by James A. Standifer, American Music, Vol. 4, No. 2 (Summer, 1986), pp. 194-205, Published by: University of Illinois Press



You can see that Roy mentions Red Nichols and Rex Stewart as his influences.

In http://www.jazz-music-history.com/Roy-Eldridge.html

"His early influences were Red Nichols, Jabbo Smith, Bix Beiderbecke and more importantly Coleman Hawkins and Benny Carter. Coleman Hawkins brought a fluid legato up-tempo style to the saxophone. While Louis Armstrong was playing a trumpet with lots of arpeggios and vertical melodies, Roy Eldridge playing in a more linear fluid style in the manner of a saxophone. Eldridge stated: "The sax players would run changes, would run through all the passing chords and things" He also said "I play nice saxophone on the trumpet"."

Red Nichols again, but also Jabbo Smith and Bix. The sax-like playing theme shows up here also.

The last point reminds me of what I have mentioned often, namely, that Bix played the cornet like a clarinet. I believe Richard Hadlock makes the same point in his excellent book "Jazz Masters of the Twenties."

Albert
In his excellent book "Jazz Masters of the Tewnties," Richard Hadlock, musician (reeds; studied with Sidney Bechet, see note below), historian, radio programmer, states in a much more elegant manner that I ever could, the question of Bix playing the cornet as a clarinet. Here are several quotes.

<em>Jazz Me Blues, however, has Bix in better form, contributing an ordered solo that seems
more inspired by clarinetists Larry Shields of the ODJB and Leon
Roppolo of the NORK than by other trumpet players. Bix's early
interest in harmonic alterations in melodic lines, undoubtedly
stemming from his passion for keyboard improvisations, suggests
that clarinetists, weaving inner harmonic-melodic parts, may have
held more fascination for him than cornetists, many of whom,
like La Rocca, were limited to simple rhythmic variations on
straight melodies. In any event, <strong>Jazz Me Blues is the first of many
recorded performances in which Bix moves with the fleetness,
grace, subtlety, and harmonic sophistication that had previously
been heard in some reedmen but seldom in brass players.</strong></em>

<em>Royal Garden Blues is again a strong blues-based performance
(this time the structure matches the mood), and the configuration
of Bixs solo bears a striking resemblance to his work on Tiger
Rag, which was recorded the same day. As before, <strong>Bix seemed to
be thinking along saxophone-clarinet lines rather than in brass
terms.</strong> His long, lazy phrases are not unlike Roppolo's. </em>

<em>Goldkette furnished some work for Bix around Detroit with
jazz groups made up of his key "hot" men Tommy Dorsey, clari-
netist Don Murray, banjoist Howdy Quicksell, and others. Some of
these men accompanied Bix to Richmond for a January record
date, and one of the selections turned out that day, Toddlin*
Blues, another Original Dixieland Jazz Band number, sounds
dated and is of no special interest, <strong>save for Bix's flowing clarinet-
like style. </strong></em>

<em>The roots of Bix's Clarinet Marmalade, incidentally, can be dis-
cerned quite plainly in two earlier recordings of the tune, one by
the Original Dixieland Jazz Band and another by the New Or-
leans Rythm Kings. For all his advanced concepts, <strong>Bix's playing
here is a kind of atavistic compendium of the work of cornetists
La Rocca and Mares and clarinetists Shields and Roppolo. </strong></em>

Interestingly, Hadlock discusses Earl Hines's piano style by comparison to trumpet and clarinet styles.

<em>It is likely, too, that Hines's
deep regard for the clarinet style of Benny Goodman caused some
modification of his old Armstrong-like "trumpet" lines. Much of
the pianist's work from this time on was closer to clarinet-
saxophone conception than to trumpet ideas.</em>

Finally, I remind of Jess Stacy's response to a question from Floyd Levin. From my IAJRC Journal article about Bix's piano compostions,

<span><em>Jess Stacy was a great admirer of Bixs. Stacy told Floyd Levin in one of his radio shows that Armstrong and Beiderbecke were the two musicians who influenced him most. When asked by Levin how a pianist could be influenced so profoundly by musicians playing a different instrument, Stacy replied, <strong>"I've been accused of playing a trumpet-style piano." </strong></em></span>

<span>Albert</span>

Note: Info about Richard Hadlock from http://kcsm.org/jazz91/announcer_hadlock.php

Richard has enjoyed playing with many outstanding musicians, in a wide spectrum of styles.  His partners include New Orleans pioneers Kid Ory, Pops Foster and Danny Barker, notable Chicagoans, Muggsy Spanier, Joe Sullivan and Wild Bill Davidson, singers Barbara Dane, Maxine Sullivan and Kim Nalley, pianists Ralph Sutton, Norma Teagarden, Butch Thompson, Larry Vuckovich, and Herbie Nichols. He has worked and/or recorded with Howard Alden, Grover Mitchell, Marty Grosz, Ben Goldberg, Dan Barrett, John Schott, Milt Hinton, Becky Kilgore, Dave Frishberg, Turk Murphy and the Hot Club of San Francisco, among many others.

Richards journalistic journey includes owning a jazz magazine,<em></em><em>The Record Changer</em>, and serving as jazz writer for <em>Downbeat</em>, <em>Metronome</em>, and the <em>San Francisco Examiner</em>.  He has written countless album notes, including an essay on Joe Sullivan, which was nominated for a Grammy Award. And yes, this is the same Richard Hadlock who wrote <em>Jazz Masters of the Twenties</em>, long considered a standard reference work, which still shows up in bookstores.

A near half-century broadcasting career began when Richard launched the Annals of Jazz on KJAZ in 1959.  Since then, he has logged 18 years at KQED and 20 more at KCSM.  He still opens with the same theme, Pagin the Devil.

Our Annals of Jazz host is also a teacher, mainly retired now, with years spent in a one-room Pomo reservation school and in the Berkeley, California, kindergarten/parent-nursery cosmos.  His most recent teaching gig was an adult class at Berkeleys Jazzschool.

Richard still finds pleasure and satisfaction in constructing thematic jazz programs and presenting them on KCSM every Sunday<span class="announcerbio"> from 7pm to 8pm.</span>
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 18th, 2010, 9:51 pm #10

Does anyone have it?

My favorite versions of "My Gal Sal" are the ones by Miff Mole & His Molers and Danny Altier. Last time I saw the Danny Altier record was in 2008 when it was sold for $1875! This is one of the highest prices for a jazz Vocalion ever paid (if popsike.com is complete).

http://www.popsike.com/php/detaildatar. ... 0324160732

Emrah
I gave the link to a real media file in my first posting (see above) about "My Gal Sal."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Feb 25, 1928. Red Nichols and His Five Pennies. Br 4844 (Canadian)
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/ramb/BRUE26752.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Right now, the site is down for maintenance.  Try it later or tomorrow. Jazz-on-line also gives a link to an mp3 file.

Albert
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