China Boy by Lange/Russo and by Whiteman

China Boy by Lange/Russo and by Whiteman

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 28th, 2009, 4:29 pm #1

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Earlier this year we had a thread on Henry Langes recording of <em>China Boy</em> <span> </span>See<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1232495310</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>John mentioned that this could well be the Dan Russo orchestra, which makes sense since Fritz Holtz played with Dan Russo. See</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.shnflac.net/details.php?id=3 ... 718efa8b44</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Greg Holtz, Fritzs grandson pointed out that several of the tracks he uploaded to Torrent displayed the influence of Bix. Indeed, the Lange recording of <em>China Boy</em> has a Bixian solo and obbligatos. If, as John points out, this is not the Henry Lange band but Dan Russos band, then the Bixian trumpet player would be George Weisheipl or Ralph Pierce. The recording was waxed in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Chicago on Jul 19, 1929. Note 1. Listen</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://bixography.com/ChinaBoyHenryLange.ram</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Compare with the Whiteman recording of the same tune on May 3, 1929.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/ramw/1929_162.ram</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>What we failed to notice at the time is a very important feature of this recording. Nick e-mailed yesterday and wrote, </span><span>Henry Lange and his <span class="yshortcuts"><span>Baker Hotel</span></span> Orch, recorded [China Boy] July 19th, 1929. The strange thing is that it was recorded before Whiteman's version was released, which was in October 1929. [the recording had been waxed on May 3, 1929] Yet it follows - at least partly - the arrangement that Whiteman used. The similarity between the two versions of China Boy (Lange/Russo and Whiteman) had been pointed out to Nick by Rob, and the fact that Lange/Russo's version was recorded before Whiteman's was released was highlighted by Frank v.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>How can the chronology be reconciled? First I remind you that Henry Lange was a pianist for Paul Whiteman, on nd off, between 1921 and 1924, and that in 1927 he led the band used<span>  </span>in the Mar 15, 1927 Philadelphia tryout of the Broadway show <em>Lucky</em>. [Note 2.] I have two suggestions. One, that through his connection with Whiteman, Lange got a copy of the <em>China Boy </em>arrangement by Lennie Hayton, written on Mar 2, 1929. This is the most likely possibility. The second, less likely I think, is that Lange got a copy of a test pressing of the Whiteman recording from May 3, 1929 in time for Langes recording of Jul 19, 1929.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>I extracted the clarinet and trumpet/cornet solos from the Lange and Whiteman recordings.The clarinet solos, first Whiteman/Friedman, then Lange, are similar.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://bixography.com/ChinaBoySolosCWhitemanLange.ram</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>The trumpet/cornet solos, first Lang then Whiteman/Bix are totally different, as we expect from Bix always improvising.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://bixography.com/ChinaBoysSolosTLangeWhiteman.html</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Discussion, comments?</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Albert</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<span></span><span></span><p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Note 1. This exemplifies the pervasive influence of Bix on trumpet players in the late 1920s. <em>China Boy </em>features a highly Bixian trumpet player which made a few recordings with Dan Russo. Turning to Henry Lange, he had another highly Bix-influenced trumpet player, Leroy Morris. This shows that several trumpet players could do a good emulation of Bix. Here we have two in Chicago at about the time <em>Cradle of Love</em> was recorded. And listen to this Bixian guy behind the vocalists (and a Mole-influenced trombonist)</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>in Langes Somebody Loves Me.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.archive.org/details/HenryLan ... odyLovesMe</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span><span></span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Note 2. Lucky ran in the Amsterdam Theatre </span><span>3/22/1927 - 5/21/1927. The music was provided by the Paul Whiteman orchestra.</span><span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
Last edited by ahaim on August 28th, 2009, 5:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Veniero Molari
Veniero Molari

August 28th, 2009, 5:42 pm #2

Impossible to connect if you are not a member of this site.Veniero
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

August 28th, 2009, 5:52 pm #3

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Earlier this year we had a thread on Henry Langes recording of <em>China Boy</em> <span> </span>See<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1232495310</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>John mentioned that this could well be the Dan Russo orchestra, which makes sense since Fritz Holtz played with Dan Russo. See</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.shnflac.net/details.php?id=3 ... 718efa8b44</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Greg Holtz, Fritzs grandson pointed out that several of the tracks he uploaded to Torrent displayed the influence of Bix. Indeed, the Lange recording of <em>China Boy</em> has a Bixian solo and obbligatos. If, as John points out, this is not the Henry Lange band but Dan Russos band, then the Bixian trumpet player would be George Weisheipl or Ralph Pierce. The recording was waxed in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Chicago on Jul 19, 1929. Note 1. Listen</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://bixography.com/ChinaBoyHenryLange.ram</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Compare with the Whiteman recording of the same tune on May 3, 1929.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/ramw/1929_162.ram</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>What we failed to notice at the time is a very important feature of this recording. Nick e-mailed yesterday and wrote, </span><span>Henry Lange and his <span class="yshortcuts"><span>Baker Hotel</span></span> Orch, recorded [China Boy] July 19th, 1929. The strange thing is that it was recorded before Whiteman's version was released, which was in October 1929. [the recording had been waxed on May 3, 1929] Yet it follows - at least partly - the arrangement that Whiteman used. The similarity between the two versions of China Boy (Lange/Russo and Whiteman) had been pointed out to Nick by Rob, and the fact that Lange/Russo's version was recorded before Whiteman's was released was highlighted by Frank v.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>How can the chronology be reconciled? First I remind you that Henry Lange was a pianist for Paul Whiteman, on nd off, between 1921 and 1924, and that in 1927 he led the band used<span>  </span>in the Mar 15, 1927 Philadelphia tryout of the Broadway show <em>Lucky</em>. [Note 2.] I have two suggestions. One, that through his connection with Whiteman, Lange got a copy of the <em>China Boy </em>arrangement by Lennie Hayton, written on Mar 2, 1929. This is the most likely possibility. The second, less likely I think, is that Lange got a copy of a test pressing of the Whiteman recording from May 3, 1929 in time for Langes recording of Jul 19, 1929.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>I extracted the clarinet and trumpet/cornet solos from the Lange and Whiteman recordings.The clarinet solos, first Whiteman/Friedman, then Lange, are similar.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://bixography.com/ChinaBoySolosCWhitemanLange.ram</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>The trumpet/cornet solos, first Lang then Whiteman/Bix are totally different, as we expect from Bix always improvising.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://bixography.com/ChinaBoysSolosTLangeWhiteman.html</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Discussion, comments?</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Albert</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<span></span><span></span><p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Note 1. This exemplifies the pervasive influence of Bix on trumpet players in the late 1920s. <em>China Boy </em>features a highly Bixian trumpet player which made a few recordings with Dan Russo. Turning to Henry Lange, he had another highly Bix-influenced trumpet player, Leroy Morris. This shows that several trumpet players could do a good emulation of Bix. Here we have two in Chicago at about the time <em>Cradle of Love</em> was recorded. And listen to this Bixian guy behind the vocalists (and a Mole-influenced trombonist)</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>in Langes Somebody Loves Me.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.archive.org/details/HenryLan ... odyLovesMe</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span><span></span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Note 2. Lucky ran in the Amsterdam Theatre </span><span>3/22/1927 - 5/21/1927. The music was provided by the Paul Whiteman orchestra.</span><span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
Is there any chance that both Lennie Hayton and Henry Lange adapted their versions of "China Boy" from the same stock arrangement? This has been known to happen! Maybe Vince G. could shed some light here...

-Brad K
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 28th, 2009, 5:53 pm #4

Impossible to connect if you are not a member of this site.Veniero
.... seven links in my posting. Which are the ones that you can't connect to?

 

Albert
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Linda
Linda

August 28th, 2009, 9:27 pm #5

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Earlier this year we had a thread on Henry Langes recording of <em>China Boy</em> <span> </span>See<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1232495310</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>John mentioned that this could well be the Dan Russo orchestra, which makes sense since Fritz Holtz played with Dan Russo. See</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.shnflac.net/details.php?id=3 ... 718efa8b44</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Greg Holtz, Fritzs grandson pointed out that several of the tracks he uploaded to Torrent displayed the influence of Bix. Indeed, the Lange recording of <em>China Boy</em> has a Bixian solo and obbligatos. If, as John points out, this is not the Henry Lange band but Dan Russos band, then the Bixian trumpet player would be George Weisheipl or Ralph Pierce. The recording was waxed in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Chicago on Jul 19, 1929. Note 1. Listen</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://bixography.com/ChinaBoyHenryLange.ram</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Compare with the Whiteman recording of the same tune on May 3, 1929.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/ramw/1929_162.ram</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>What we failed to notice at the time is a very important feature of this recording. Nick e-mailed yesterday and wrote, </span><span>Henry Lange and his <span class="yshortcuts"><span>Baker Hotel</span></span> Orch, recorded [China Boy] July 19th, 1929. The strange thing is that it was recorded before Whiteman's version was released, which was in October 1929. [the recording had been waxed on May 3, 1929] Yet it follows - at least partly - the arrangement that Whiteman used. The similarity between the two versions of China Boy (Lange/Russo and Whiteman) had been pointed out to Nick by Rob, and the fact that Lange/Russo's version was recorded before Whiteman's was released was highlighted by Frank v.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>How can the chronology be reconciled? First I remind you that Henry Lange was a pianist for Paul Whiteman, on nd off, between 1921 and 1924, and that in 1927 he led the band used<span>  </span>in the Mar 15, 1927 Philadelphia tryout of the Broadway show <em>Lucky</em>. [Note 2.] I have two suggestions. One, that through his connection with Whiteman, Lange got a copy of the <em>China Boy </em>arrangement by Lennie Hayton, written on Mar 2, 1929. This is the most likely possibility. The second, less likely I think, is that Lange got a copy of a test pressing of the Whiteman recording from May 3, 1929 in time for Langes recording of Jul 19, 1929.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>I extracted the clarinet and trumpet/cornet solos from the Lange and Whiteman recordings.The clarinet solos, first Whiteman/Friedman, then Lange, are similar.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://bixography.com/ChinaBoySolosCWhitemanLange.ram</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>The trumpet/cornet solos, first Lang then Whiteman/Bix are totally different, as we expect from Bix always improvising.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://bixography.com/ChinaBoysSolosTLangeWhiteman.html</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Discussion, comments?</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Albert</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<span></span><span></span><p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Note 1. This exemplifies the pervasive influence of Bix on trumpet players in the late 1920s. <em>China Boy </em>features a highly Bixian trumpet player which made a few recordings with Dan Russo. Turning to Henry Lange, he had another highly Bix-influenced trumpet player, Leroy Morris. This shows that several trumpet players could do a good emulation of Bix. Here we have two in Chicago at about the time <em>Cradle of Love</em> was recorded. And listen to this Bixian guy behind the vocalists (and a Mole-influenced trombonist)</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>in Langes Somebody Loves Me.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.archive.org/details/HenryLan ... odyLovesMe</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span><span></span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Note 2. Lucky ran in the Amsterdam Theatre </span><span>3/22/1927 - 5/21/1927. The music was provided by the Paul Whiteman orchestra.</span><span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
That is indeed a fine arrangement of Somebody Loves Me played by Henry Lange. Definitely a Bix influenced cornet behind the vocal. But I wonder if there are 2 trombone players on this recording or 1 trombone and 1 mellophone? The ?trombone soloist at 1:45 sounds like a different musician playing than the trombone solo at 2:45. Is it possible the solo at 1:45 is not a trombone but is a mellophone? The solo has some very fast notes that sound to me like a mellophone. The soloist at 2:45 definitely sounds like he is playing a trombone.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 28th, 2009, 10:25 pm #6


.... the the hot soloist at 1:45 plays mellophone. Indeed, he agrees with you, and so do I. . Very nice and mellow.

Albert
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Veniero Molari
Veniero Molari

August 28th, 2009, 10:29 pm #7

.... seven links in my posting. Which are the ones that you can't connect to?

 

Albert
The second one,thanks,Veniero
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 28th, 2009, 10:36 pm #8


Here it is,

"This is a nice collection of recordings that my Grandfather (Fritz) Holtz played on.  He moved to Chicago at age 16 to pursue a musical career. He played pretty much every brass instrument and woodwind instrument, but he was predominantly a clarinet player and chart arranger.  The Russo Band endorsed Martin Horns...more on that later..  

So once in Chicago, Grandpa Holtz first played in a band called The Jac-Mac Musical Masters.  That band played live dates, but never made it into the studio to record.  Next he was a member of Dan Russo and the Oriole Orchestra.  Grandpa toured with this band extensively in the 1926-1932 time period.  They played from Chicago to Texas and all points in between.  During this time Fritz rubbed elbows with the likes of Bix Beiderbecke and louis Armstrong.  He had all sorts of stories of how Bix was a raging alcoholic.  On track 19, the trumpet player's name is Hector (Hec) Herbert, and as you can hear, he drew a LOT of influence from Bix.  Grandpa Holtz told me many stories about his touring days, including meeting Al Capone and playing at many speakeasy clubs owned by the Chicago Mob.  He told me a LOT about  mob activities that he witnessed, but that could be a book unto itself..  

The Russo Band recorded several sessions in the Brunswick Studios at the Merchandise Mart in Chicago, Illinois.  Most of these recordings were released under the Dan Russo & The Oriole Orchestra name, but some were released under other band names. Back in those days, (these days as well, I guess) when in the studio, many band leaders used session men (pretty much anyone who was around the studio at the time of the session) as well as some of their regular touring band members, and my Grandfather was among those session men on quite a few recordings.  This is consistent with what Grandpa Holtz told me about the recorded sessions that he played on. Grandpa mentioned Slatts Randall and Isham Jones as other bands he recorded with, none of which are included in this collection.  I will probably never know the real scope of my Grandfathers recording career, as  a lot of the time the session players were not properly credited.  

Funny, my Grandfather told me that he was fully employed and well-paid all the way through the great depression.  Luck seemed to follow him everywhere he went. After his playing days were over, my Grandfather worked for and became President of The Martin Band Instrument Company, and that company made the famous Committee Trumpets played by such greats as Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis.  My Grandfather signed Dizzy and Miles to endorse the Martin Committee Trumpets, and he had Dizzy's trumpets specially designed with the raised bell.  He also had a special order trumpet for Miles.  Miles wanted a BLUE trumpet, and the folks at Martin had to figure out how to make a nice BLUE brass instrument.  The first prototype was delivered to Miles at a location on the South Side of Chicago, and according to my Grandfather Miles HATED it.  Apparently it was pretty much a brass trumpet painted blue, and that was not what Miles was looking for.  So the engineers at Martin had to go back to the drawing board.  They eventually figured out how to "blue" the brass through some kind of metallurgy, and when they delivered the horn to Miles, he loved it, and ordered several of them.  I saw one of them go up for auction at Christies a while back, and it fetched top dollar.  Anyway, Grandpa became good friends with Miles and Dizzy, and both of them visited often when we were up at the Lake Cottage in Michigan in the 1960s and 70s....

Now about this music...I received a reel to reel tape with the first 18 songs of this set.  This reel was made by a guy in Pennsylvania that just happened to have this great collection of Russo 78's. The son of one of the band members brought me the reel to transfer to CD with a standalone CD burner.  I used a TEAC X-30 reel player and a Marantz burner.  The last track is from a gentleman in Australia that was into taking old 78rpm records and cleaning them up to bring out what fidelity he could.  Out of pure chance, he included "Tain't No Sin To Take Off Your Skin, And Dance Around In Your Bones", the last track in this project, and the ONLY track that my Grandfather sang lead vocal.  

I have provided what information I have about each recording contained on this CD.  All of these songs were recorded direct to disc in the Brunswick studio.  Most of these recordings were on the BRUNSWICK record label, a few are on the VOCALION label. These nineteen songs fit on one CD.  The last track has been a family favorite for , well, about 60 years or so. I have included the standard record as I received it on reel for track 18, and the cleaned up version as track 19.

So...the lineage of the first 18 tracks is:

78rpm record > Reel > CD > EAC > FLAC 8

Lineage for track 19 is:

78rpm record > filtering & processing > CD > EAC > FLAC 8

Track 1

(YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU) - WHY DID YOU? Brunswick 4439 - recorded July 5, 1929 released as DAN RUSSO & THE ORIOLE ORCHESTRA.

Track 2

AN OLD ITALIAN LOVE SONG Brunswick 4439 recorded July 5, 1929 released as DAN RUSSO & THE ORIOLE ORCHESTRA.

Track 3

LITTLE PAL Vocalion 15813 recorded July 1929 - released as JAY RICHARDS AND HIS ORCHESTRA.

Track 4

IM IN SEVENTH HEAVEN Vocalion 15813 released as JAY RICHARDS AND HIS ORCHESTRA.

Track 5

CHINA BOY Brunswick 4478 Recorded July 19, 1929 Released as HENRY LANGE & THE HOTEL BAKER ORCHESTRA.

Track 6

SOMEBODY LOVES ME Brunswick 4478 recorded July 19, 1929 Released as HENRY LANGE & THE HOTEL BAKER ORCHESTRA.

Track 7

WHY CANT YOU Vocalion 15812 recorded July 20, 1929 Released as JAY RICHARDS AND HIS ORCHESTRA.

Track 8

USED TO YOU Vocalion 15812 recorded July 20, 1929 Released as JAY RICHARDS AND HIS ORCHESTRA.  

Track 9

IM THE MEDICINE MAN FOR THE BLUES Brunswick 4490 recorded July 31, 1929 Released as DAN RUSSO AND THE ORIOLE ORCHESTRA.

Track 10

BECAUSE YOU SAID I LOVE YOU Brunswick 4502 Recorded July 31, 1929 - Released as DAN RUSSO AND THE ORIOLE ORCHESTRA.

Track 11

WOULDNT IT BE WONDERFUL? Brunswick 4490 Recorded August 9, 1929 - Released as DAN RUSSO AND THE ORIOLE ORCHESTRA.

Track 12

SWEETNESS Vocalion 15835 Recorded Aug. 29, 1929 Released as JAY RICHARDS AND HIS ORCHESTRA.

Track 13

I DONT WANT YOUR KISSES Vocalion 15835B - Recorded Aug 29, 1929 Released as JAY RICHARDS AND HIS ORCHESTRA.

Track 14

THE ILLINOIS LOYALTY SONG Brunswick 4563 Recorded Sep. 1929 Released as DAN RUSSO AND THE ORIOLE ORCHESTRA.

Track 15

WAVE THE FLAG OF OLD CHICAGO Brunswick 4563 Recorded Sep. 29, 1929 - Released as DAN RUSSO AND THE ORIOLE ORCHESTRA.

Track 16

SWEETHEART Brunswick 4708 Recorded January 1930 Released as DAN RUSSO AND THE ORIOLE ORCHESTRA

Track 17

THE TALK OF THE TOWN Brunswick 4709 Recorded January 1930 Released as BENNY MEROFF

Track 18

TAINT NO SIN TO TAKE OFF YOUR SKIN (AND DANCE AROUND IN YOUR BONES) Brunswick 4708 (78A)  - recorded January 1930 - Released as DAN RUSSO AND THE ORIOLE ORCHESTRA - Vocal and Clarinet by Fritz Holtz

Track 19

(Cleaned up version) - TAINT NO SIN TO TAKE OFF YOUR SKIN (AND DANCE AROUND IN YOUR BONES) Brunswick 4708 (78A)  - recorded January 1930 - Released as DAN RUSSO AND THE ORIOLE ORCHESTRA - Vocal and Clarinet by Fritz Holtz"

Albert


Last edited by ahaim on August 28th, 2009, 10:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Veniero Molari
Veniero Molari

August 29th, 2009, 7:44 am #9

Thank you so much.Is that CD available?.Veniero
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 29th, 2009, 5:42 pm #10


Available in the internet via torrent. I believe I downloaded all the tunes and have them in my hard disk. let me know if there is a particular tunethat you wish to hear.

Albert
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