Burnett James' biography of Bix.

Burnett James' biography of Bix.

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 22nd, 2012, 3:38 pm #1


Ken kindly sent a scan of the cover of Bix's biography by Burnett James. thanks, Ken.

Cassell Edition from Ken



This is different than the one I have in my short review of the book in the main Bixography website.

A. S. Barnes edition.


I found a third and different cover googling the internet.

Unknown edition
 

The thre images above are from the Kings of Jazz series. This is what I wrote about this book in about 1999.

<a></a>"Bix Beiderbecke"by Burnett James. Cassell and Co. Limited, London, 1959. Description: 90 p.; four photographs. Contains a brief discography. This book is similar, but less detailed than, "Bugles for Beiderbecke" . It provides a factual description of Bix's life in chapter 1, and an analysis of Bix' cornet playing and of his influence on his fellow jazz musicians in chapters 2 and 3. This book was published again in 1961 by  A. S. Barnes and Company, Inc., New York, as part of the Kings of Jazz series. Other titles in the series include Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington,  Jelly Roll Morton, King Oliver, Bessie Smith, and Fats Waller.

More information about the Kings of Jazz series from
http://www.jazzfirstbooks.com/catalog/p ... cts_id=606






<table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tr><td><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tr><td valign="top"><em>The Kings Of Jazz, Complete 12 Volume Set By Various Authors</em></td></tr></table></td></tr><tr><td><em><img border="0" alt="" src="http://www.jazzfirstbooks.com/catalog/i ... _trans.gif" height="10"></em></td></tr><tr><td><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="2" align="left"><tr><td>
<em> </em></td></tr></table>
<em>Cassells, London, True First Edition, First Printing 1959-1963. Also published in an eleven volume paperback set in the U.S. in 1961 by A.S. Barnes, but this is the true first edition. Complete set of the Kings Of Jazz , in twelve numbered volumes, a series of short, critical biographies of the jazz greats, primarily by noted British jazz writers. Volume 7, Charlie Parker, is SIGNED by the author, esteemed jazz writer Max Harrison, at the title page. Titles in order of publication are: Duke Ellington by G.E. Lampert, Dizzy Gillespie by Michael James, Bessie Smith by Paul Oliver, Bix Beiderbecke by Burnett James, Louis Armstrong by Albert McCarthy, Charlie Parker by Max Harrison, Fats Waller by Charles Fox, King Oliver by Martin Williams, Miles Davis by Michael James, Johhny Dodds by G.E. Lambert, Jelly Roll Morton by Martin Williams and Coleman Hawkins by Albert McCarthy. In original bright, pictorial, laminated boards with no dust jackets as issued, all are first printings published between 1959 and 1963. Volumes 1-4 are very good+, with touch of age toning to pages, light edge wear and some loss to laminations, with neat ink inscription to ffep of Volume 1. Volume 5-12 are near fine to about fine, light age toning to pages, touch of wear to spine ends of several volumes. A wonderful little series, an excellent introduction to the greats of jazz, very uncommon to find </em>
</td></tr></table>
It is a good series. I purchased a copy of the complete set, including the box,  years ago.  It is the paperback A. S. Barnes edition. I also have the single volume about Bix in hard cover, the Cassell edition.

I have not seen a discussion of any similarities between Bix and Sidney Bechet in the jazz literature. Interestingly, James discusses this point in his book. Here is the relevant section.




And here is Bechet's version of Margie.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeR0KwgVU90

I don't find any similarities. Bechet plays lots of notes in contrast with Bix's economy of notes, and the phrasing sounds completely different to me.

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 22nd, 2012, 4:40 pm #2


.... of  Sep 8. 1930 is well known.

Here is Burnett James strory via Jack Teagarden of three trombonists inadvertently hired by Bix.



Virtually the same story as that of the three clarinetists. Problem: there were only two trombonists (Cullen and Teagarden, no Dorsey; right?) in the Hoagy session of Sep 15, 1930.

Albert
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

June 23rd, 2012, 8:28 pm #3

Ken kindly sent a scan of the cover of Bix's biography by Burnett James. thanks, Ken.

Cassell Edition from Ken



This is different than the one I have in my short review of the book in the main Bixography website.

A. S. Barnes edition.


I found a third and different cover googling the internet.

Unknown edition
 

The thre images above are from the Kings of Jazz series. This is what I wrote about this book in about 1999.

<a></a>"Bix Beiderbecke"by Burnett James. Cassell and Co. Limited, London, 1959. Description: 90 p.; four photographs. Contains a brief discography. This book is similar, but less detailed than, "Bugles for Beiderbecke" . It provides a factual description of Bix's life in chapter 1, and an analysis of Bix' cornet playing and of his influence on his fellow jazz musicians in chapters 2 and 3. This book was published again in 1961 by  A. S. Barnes and Company, Inc., New York, as part of the Kings of Jazz series. Other titles in the series include Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington,  Jelly Roll Morton, King Oliver, Bessie Smith, and Fats Waller.

More information about the Kings of Jazz series from
http://www.jazzfirstbooks.com/catalog/p ... cts_id=606






<table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tr><td><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tr><td valign="top"><em>The Kings Of Jazz, Complete 12 Volume Set By Various Authors</em></td></tr></table></td></tr><tr><td><em><img border="0" alt="" src="http://www.jazzfirstbooks.com/catalog/i ... _trans.gif" height="10"></em></td></tr><tr><td><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="2" align="left"><tr><td>
<em> </em></td></tr></table>
<em>Cassells, London, True First Edition, First Printing 1959-1963. Also published in an eleven volume paperback set in the U.S. in 1961 by A.S. Barnes, but this is the true first edition. Complete set of the Kings Of Jazz , in twelve numbered volumes, a series of short, critical biographies of the jazz greats, primarily by noted British jazz writers. Volume 7, Charlie Parker, is SIGNED by the author, esteemed jazz writer Max Harrison, at the title page. Titles in order of publication are: Duke Ellington by G.E. Lampert, Dizzy Gillespie by Michael James, Bessie Smith by Paul Oliver, Bix Beiderbecke by Burnett James, Louis Armstrong by Albert McCarthy, Charlie Parker by Max Harrison, Fats Waller by Charles Fox, King Oliver by Martin Williams, Miles Davis by Michael James, Johhny Dodds by G.E. Lambert, Jelly Roll Morton by Martin Williams and Coleman Hawkins by Albert McCarthy. In original bright, pictorial, laminated boards with no dust jackets as issued, all are first printings published between 1959 and 1963. Volumes 1-4 are very good+, with touch of age toning to pages, light edge wear and some loss to laminations, with neat ink inscription to ffep of Volume 1. Volume 5-12 are near fine to about fine, light age toning to pages, touch of wear to spine ends of several volumes. A wonderful little series, an excellent introduction to the greats of jazz, very uncommon to find </em>
</td></tr></table>
It is a good series. I purchased a copy of the complete set, including the box,  years ago.  It is the paperback A. S. Barnes edition. I also have the single volume about Bix in hard cover, the Cassell edition.

I have not seen a discussion of any similarities between Bix and Sidney Bechet in the jazz literature. Interestingly, James discusses this point in his book. Here is the relevant section.




And here is Bechet's version of Margie.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeR0KwgVU90

I don't find any similarities. Bechet plays lots of notes in contrast with Bix's economy of notes, and the phrasing sounds completely different to me.

Albert
"I have not seen a discussion of any similarities between Bix and Sidney Bechet"

From somewhere in the back of my mind I seem to recall that we discussed this in the forum several years ago, albeit briefly. I am away at the moment but will have a search through the archives when I get back tomorrow.

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 23rd, 2012, 11:11 pm #4


This from 2003!!!! And written by yours truly, to boot.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1052178945

Albert
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Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

June 24th, 2012, 1:41 pm #5

That was a remarkable exchange that Nick recalled. Reading Jean Pierre Lion's thoughts on this current subject was remarkable. I think Brad Kay also summarized that position simply and well:

<em>"Altogether, I think Bix's way of playing evolved along with his way of hearing music. It was a two-way street. As Albert suggests, his basic creative drive was incorruptibly deep and consistent, and not subject to a sudden change of course. But Bix was also responsive to every sound around him, as each of his records eloquently attest."</em>

I am reminded of the poem by Walt Whitman which begins

<em>THERE was a child went forth every day;
And the first object he look'd upon, that object he became;
And that object became part of him for the day, or a certain part of the day, or for many years, or stretching cycles of years.</em>

Had Bix been a musical recluse, shutting himself off from all other players, in order to think about his music, it might have been free of influence. We know that he could not have done that, never did that, to the point of almost never sleeping, always seeking to listen to and play with a variety of very diverse music after his own job was over for the day. There is no way to take in so much from the outside and not to incorporate it into one's self. It seems to me that creativity requires taking in everything and then reshaping it in the mind into something new. True, there is a constant "Bix" persona in it all, but with that always surprising newness. To me, Bix responded to the particular musicians around him and to the song itself in a distinctive way. "Never the same twice."

Thanks for sending us back to that enlightening and extremely civil discussion!


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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 26th, 2012, 12:59 pm #6

Ken kindly sent a scan of the cover of Bix's biography by Burnett James. thanks, Ken.

Cassell Edition from Ken



This is different than the one I have in my short review of the book in the main Bixography website.

A. S. Barnes edition.


I found a third and different cover googling the internet.

Unknown edition
 

The thre images above are from the Kings of Jazz series. This is what I wrote about this book in about 1999.

<a></a>"Bix Beiderbecke"by Burnett James. Cassell and Co. Limited, London, 1959. Description: 90 p.; four photographs. Contains a brief discography. This book is similar, but less detailed than, "Bugles for Beiderbecke" . It provides a factual description of Bix's life in chapter 1, and an analysis of Bix' cornet playing and of his influence on his fellow jazz musicians in chapters 2 and 3. This book was published again in 1961 by  A. S. Barnes and Company, Inc., New York, as part of the Kings of Jazz series. Other titles in the series include Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington,  Jelly Roll Morton, King Oliver, Bessie Smith, and Fats Waller.

More information about the Kings of Jazz series from
http://www.jazzfirstbooks.com/catalog/p ... cts_id=606






<table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tr><td><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tr><td valign="top"><em>The Kings Of Jazz, Complete 12 Volume Set By Various Authors</em></td></tr></table></td></tr><tr><td><em><img border="0" alt="" src="http://www.jazzfirstbooks.com/catalog/i ... _trans.gif" height="10"></em></td></tr><tr><td><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="2" align="left"><tr><td>
<em> </em></td></tr></table>
<em>Cassells, London, True First Edition, First Printing 1959-1963. Also published in an eleven volume paperback set in the U.S. in 1961 by A.S. Barnes, but this is the true first edition. Complete set of the Kings Of Jazz , in twelve numbered volumes, a series of short, critical biographies of the jazz greats, primarily by noted British jazz writers. Volume 7, Charlie Parker, is SIGNED by the author, esteemed jazz writer Max Harrison, at the title page. Titles in order of publication are: Duke Ellington by G.E. Lampert, Dizzy Gillespie by Michael James, Bessie Smith by Paul Oliver, Bix Beiderbecke by Burnett James, Louis Armstrong by Albert McCarthy, Charlie Parker by Max Harrison, Fats Waller by Charles Fox, King Oliver by Martin Williams, Miles Davis by Michael James, Johhny Dodds by G.E. Lambert, Jelly Roll Morton by Martin Williams and Coleman Hawkins by Albert McCarthy. In original bright, pictorial, laminated boards with no dust jackets as issued, all are first printings published between 1959 and 1963. Volumes 1-4 are very good+, with touch of age toning to pages, light edge wear and some loss to laminations, with neat ink inscription to ffep of Volume 1. Volume 5-12 are near fine to about fine, light age toning to pages, touch of wear to spine ends of several volumes. A wonderful little series, an excellent introduction to the greats of jazz, very uncommon to find </em>
</td></tr></table>
It is a good series. I purchased a copy of the complete set, including the box,  years ago.  It is the paperback A. S. Barnes edition. I also have the single volume about Bix in hard cover, the Cassell edition.

I have not seen a discussion of any similarities between Bix and Sidney Bechet in the jazz literature. Interestingly, James discusses this point in his book. Here is the relevant section.




And here is Bechet's version of Margie.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeR0KwgVU90

I don't find any similarities. Bechet plays lots of notes in contrast with Bix's economy of notes, and the phrasing sounds completely different to me.

Albert
From the NYPL digital collection. Sidney in 1920.
<div><img border="0" alt="[Three-quarter length portrait of jazz saxophonist, clarinetist and composer Sidney Bechet with clarinet.]" src="http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=1697023&t=w"> </div><div> </div><div> </div><div>Albert</div>
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