Brian Rust March 19, 1922 - January 5, 2011

Brian Rust March 19, 1922 - January 5, 2011

Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

January 6th, 2011, 11:40 am #1


Dear all,

Sorry to be the bearer of sad news, but I thought you should know that Brian Rust passed away in his sleep yesterday, aged 88.

As Mark Berresford said, it's the end of an era.


Nick

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 6th, 2011, 2:10 pm #2


From http://www.rustbooks.com/index.php

<em><strong>As the originator of present-day jazz, dance band and label discography, his [Brian's] works are revered world-wide.</strong></em>

They sure are. My copies (well worn out) of Brian's jazz and dance band discographies are right on my desk, next to my computer. I don't know what I would do without them.

My hat off to a giant. RIP Mr. Rust.

Albert Haim
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Ken Bristow
Ken Bristow

January 6th, 2011, 5:35 pm #3

Very sad news indeed. Especially for Bixophiles. Brian was a Bix man through and through. On his many "Mardi Gras" radio programmes on the London Station Capital Radio, he never missed a excuse to put a Bix record on the turntable. He had a genuine love of Bix, the Roaring Twenties and everything related to the Jazz Age. We salute him today. On behalf of all forumites we say, Rest in Peace, Brian.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 7th, 2011, 12:28 am #4


There are 25 citations to Bix in Brian Rust's book, "My Kind of Jazz." I quote three sentences.

<em><strong>The truly beautiful tone he achieved on his instrument, his limitless creative force, and his devotion to jazz playing were in themselves sufficient to ensure his immortality trough the records he made in the six brief years from Feb 18, 1924 to Sep 15, 1930.</strong></em>

<strong><em>Though one of the first, 'Singin' he Blues,' has been acclaimed loud and long as a jewel in Bix's crown - which it is - his record of "I'm Coming Virginai,' recorded there months later, displays Bix in some of the most fiery playing of his</em> <em>career.</em></strong>

<strong><em>Perhaps Bix's finest solo on a Whiteman disc is on 'Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now' on which he is to be heard in twenty four bars of exultant , passionate cornet playing, the middle eight of the chorus being played by the strings, straight, actually increasing the tension, the anticipation of the second part of Bix's solo.</em></strong>

Listen http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Olsphu8i9iM

I also call your attention to WBIX # 177 where I played Brian Rust's Hot Ten as listed in the June 2010 issue of the IAJRC Journal.

http://bixography.com/wbix151to200.html

Not surprisingly, one of the Hot Ten is Whiteman's <em>'Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now.' </em>

Albert
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

January 8th, 2011, 5:56 am #5

Brian Rust and I met a couple of times during my trip to England in 1985. Once was at the Wandsworth 78 swap meet in London, where he had a couple hundred mostly British dance band and music hall records for sale (cheap!). He was anything but jaded about records, after a lifetime in the hobby. His enthusiasm was such that he would steer a customer off one record and onto another when he thought it necessary: "Oh, you won't find much jazz on that one!"

Somehow in the course of our mostly convivial chat, I innocently mentioned ex-Britisher Leonard Feather, then the jazz critic of the Los Angeles Times and a noted sourpuss when it came to early jazz. Suddenly Brian went nuclear: "DON'T talk about that blighter to ME!! Why, he trundled off to America and out of harm's way during the Blitz, when the rest of us lot were getting BOMBED TO HELLl! That man is a TRAITOR!" Having touched a nerve, I dropped the subject, and waited for Brian's pulse to return to normal.

Later, we met at his modest row house, spending several hours mulling over shellac-related trivia. We got on like a couple of collectors; any sort of awe I might have had communing with the Godfather of Discography vanished in the ease of his company.

He could be a stubborn curmudgeon. In his book "American Record Labels," in the chapter on Nordskog/Sunshine, he brutally panned the 1921 Kid Ory Creole Band sides, saying they were poorly recorded, sluggish performances, "candidates for the title of Most Disappointing Jazz Records in Jazz History, hardly worthy of a Negro band from the very birthplace of the idiom." Around 1995, I found that those sides had to be played at 85 rpm - ten per cent faster than 78 - to hear the music at its proper pitch, tempo and timbre. At 85, they came alive! I immediately sent a corrected tape to Brian, thinking maybe he'd have the same epiphany. But he stuck to his gun: "I thought those records were dreadful then, and my opinion hasn't changed." Sheesh.

He is a deity nonetheless. Hardly a day passes in my life as a record collector without a mention of his name: "Gotta lookit up in Rust!" "What does Rust say?" "Where the hell is my Rust??"

-Brad Kay
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 8th, 2011, 2:54 pm #6


In 1963 Brian Rust published "Jazz Records 1897-1931" At first he sold copies directly, out of his home, having advertised in the "Melody Maker." That's how I met him - an unassuming, scholarly genius.

Last edited by ahaim on January 8th, 2011, 11:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 8th, 2011, 3:08 pm #7

From http://www.rustbooks.com/index.php

<em><strong>As the originator of present-day jazz, dance band and label discography, his [Brian's] works are revered world-wide.</strong></em>

They sure are. My copies (well worn out) of Brian's jazz and dance band discographies are right on my desk, next to my computer. I don't know what I would do without them.

My hat off to a giant. RIP Mr. Rust.

Albert Haim
  http://www.vjm.biz/newpage8.htm

Albert

 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 8th, 2011, 3:10 pm #8


Part 1  http://bixography.com/rustahola1.ram

Part 2  http://bixography.com/rustahola2.ram

Courtesy of Nick Dellow.

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on January 8th, 2011, 3:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 8th, 2011, 4:12 pm #9


.... John Wright has a terrific set of  British Dance Band Shows available on demand in

http://www.r2ok.co.uk/dancebandshow.htm

One of the tunes in Show # 83 is My Ideal (Horatio Nicholls) Harry Shalson singing, accompanied by an orchestra directed by Leo Kahn. Recorded 20 June 1929. HMV B3088. The fabulous Finn Sylvester Ahola plays trumpet. I extracted a short piece from the recording with Hooley playing muted trumpet and a very short solo, typical of Hooley's staccato (is that the right description?) playing, at 40-52  seconds. 

bixography.com/MyIdealShalsonHooley.mp3

I remind you that track # 25 in Nick's volume 2 of "The Influence of Bix Beiderbecke" is Harry Shalson's "With My Guitar and You" with a mellow, Bixian solo by Norman Payne.

To read about Harry Shalson, visit http://www.jabw.demon.co.uk/shalson.htm

Albert

 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 8th, 2011, 11:33 pm #10

Nick writes, "In many ways, I think the attached letter that Brian Rust sent to a correspondent in 1943 neatly encapsulates his ardent, driven desire for compiling a jazz discography, as well as his <span class="yshortcuts" style="background:transparent none repeat scroll 0% 0%;border-bottom:medium none;">dry sense of humour</span>. I found this letter amongst a pile of wartime magazines I acquired several years ago. I have no idea how it found its way in between the now fragile, fraying pages but it seems particularly poignant now."



Thanks a lot, Nick, for all your contributions to the Forum.

Albert
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