Bix & the Best Actor in the World (IMO, of course!)

Bix & the Best Actor in the World (IMO, of course!)

Jamaica
Jamaica

June 16th, 2010, 11:00 pm #1

http://www.cmt.com/news/news-in-brief/1 ... rack.jhtml

Alison Krauss has contributed a new recording, "Lay My Burden Down," to the soundtrack of an upcoming film, Get Low. The song was written by Aoife O'Donovan, and the track features Jerry Douglas on Dobro, Dan Tyminski on mandolin, Barry Bales on bass and Bryan Sutton on guitar. The soundtrack will be released July 27 on Rounder Records. The film stars Robert Duvall, Bill Murray, Sissy Spacek and Lucas Black and will be released by Sony Pictures Classics. The film is based on the true story of Felix "Bush" Breazeale, a Tennessee recluse who planned his own funeral in 1938 while he was still alive to enjoy it. Douglas and Academy Award-winning composer Jan A.P. Kaczmarek wrote the score. In addition, the SteelDrivers contributed to the soundtrack and appear in the film. The rest of the soundtrack includes vintage tracks from the Ink Spots, Gene Austin, Paul Whiteman and Bix Beiderbecke.

Been looking forward to this film, and am thrilled to hear Bix plays a little part in it!
The trailer: http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi2880046873/

(Don't know in what context they'll be using Bix, as he was gone by then, but I thrilled somebody still finds his music worth using in a film!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 16th, 2010, 11:42 pm #2


From http://www.musicrow.com/2010/06/get-low ... nashville/

1. Lay My Burden Down ¨C Alison Krauss
2. If I Didn¡¯t Care ¨C The Ink Spots
3. Jesus Come For Me ¨C The SteelDrivers
4. Sitting Mule/Drive to Town ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
5. Drive to Town for Clothes ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas and Stuart Duncan
6. No Haircut ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
7. Farewell Blues ¨C Paul Whiteman
8. Monkey Bay ¨C Jerry Douglas, Edgar Meyer & Russ Barenberg
9. Whiskey Before Breakfast ¨C The SteelDrivers
10. East Virginia Fast ¨C The SteelDrivers
11. North ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
12. Bush Shows Maddie Around ©\ Score
13. Angelina Baker ¨C The SteelDrivers
14. The Mystery of Felix ©\ Score
15. I¡¯m Looking Over A Four Leaf Clover ©\ Bix Beiderbecke (aka Billy Murray & Jean Goldkette Orchestra)
16. My Blue Heaven ¨C Gene Austin

Not one the best Bix recordings, but it will do.

I first saw Robert Duvall in one of my favorite movies in the whole world, "To Kill A Mocking Bird." Duvall played the role of Arthur "Boo" Radley. From IMDB, <em>"Arthur "Boo" Radley is the mysterious neighbor of young Jem and Scout Finch. We know that he is somehow disabled, has a violent past, and never leaves his home. While his actual character isn't revealed until the end of the movie, he serves as a dual figure of childhood fears and childhood trust. Boo Radley is a pivotal character, since he becomes the childrens' savior at the end of the film." </em>As always, Duvall adds another dimension to any film he plays in. Of course, he was terrific in "Open Range," a great western directed by Kevin Costner, the last Duvall film I saw.

Albert
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Jim Petersen
Jim Petersen

June 17th, 2010, 2:53 am #3

"Second Hand Lions" is a very entertaining film in my opinion. I of course enjoyed "To Kill a Mockingbird" also. Robert Duvall has played a variety of roles and has done them all very well ~ from the "Lonesome Dove" series to that stock car racing movie (name slips my mind at the moment) was it "Days of Thunder"?

I've always thought "I'm Coming (Home) Virginia" would make a great title tune for any number of movies.
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Jamaica
Jamaica

June 17th, 2010, 6:54 am #4

From http://www.musicrow.com/2010/06/get-low ... nashville/

1. Lay My Burden Down ¨C Alison Krauss
2. If I Didn¡¯t Care ¨C The Ink Spots
3. Jesus Come For Me ¨C The SteelDrivers
4. Sitting Mule/Drive to Town ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
5. Drive to Town for Clothes ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas and Stuart Duncan
6. No Haircut ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
7. Farewell Blues ¨C Paul Whiteman
8. Monkey Bay ¨C Jerry Douglas, Edgar Meyer & Russ Barenberg
9. Whiskey Before Breakfast ¨C The SteelDrivers
10. East Virginia Fast ¨C The SteelDrivers
11. North ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
12. Bush Shows Maddie Around ©\ Score
13. Angelina Baker ¨C The SteelDrivers
14. The Mystery of Felix ©\ Score
15. I¡¯m Looking Over A Four Leaf Clover ©\ Bix Beiderbecke (aka Billy Murray & Jean Goldkette Orchestra)
16. My Blue Heaven ¨C Gene Austin

Not one the best Bix recordings, but it will do.

I first saw Robert Duvall in one of my favorite movies in the whole world, "To Kill A Mocking Bird." Duvall played the role of Arthur "Boo" Radley. From IMDB, <em>"Arthur "Boo" Radley is the mysterious neighbor of young Jem and Scout Finch. We know that he is somehow disabled, has a violent past, and never leaves his home. While his actual character isn't revealed until the end of the movie, he serves as a dual figure of childhood fears and childhood trust. Boo Radley is a pivotal character, since he becomes the childrens' savior at the end of the film." </em>As always, Duvall adds another dimension to any film he plays in. Of course, he was terrific in "Open Range," a great western directed by Kevin Costner, the last Duvall film I saw.

Albert
"To Kill A Mockingbird" was Duvall's first role in a motion picture. Amazingly versatile actor. Took him 40 years, before he actually started repeating himself, and even then, he's still a hoot to watch. He was my greatest inspiration, when I was studying acting!
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John Rowland
John Rowland

June 17th, 2010, 1:51 pm #5

http://www.cmt.com/news/news-in-brief/1 ... rack.jhtml

Alison Krauss has contributed a new recording, "Lay My Burden Down," to the soundtrack of an upcoming film, Get Low. The song was written by Aoife O'Donovan, and the track features Jerry Douglas on Dobro, Dan Tyminski on mandolin, Barry Bales on bass and Bryan Sutton on guitar. The soundtrack will be released July 27 on Rounder Records. The film stars Robert Duvall, Bill Murray, Sissy Spacek and Lucas Black and will be released by Sony Pictures Classics. The film is based on the true story of Felix "Bush" Breazeale, a Tennessee recluse who planned his own funeral in 1938 while he was still alive to enjoy it. Douglas and Academy Award-winning composer Jan A.P. Kaczmarek wrote the score. In addition, the SteelDrivers contributed to the soundtrack and appear in the film. The rest of the soundtrack includes vintage tracks from the Ink Spots, Gene Austin, Paul Whiteman and Bix Beiderbecke.

Been looking forward to this film, and am thrilled to hear Bix plays a little part in it!
The trailer: http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi2880046873/

(Don't know in what context they'll be using Bix, as he was gone by then, but I thrilled somebody still finds his music worth using in a film!
I'm not a country music fan, but I do love Alison Krauss' voice. I'm sure most of us like The Ink Spots. The Whiteman and Bix are familiar, but I don't know the other artists listed. I will want to see this just for the sake of hearing Bix on a theater's speakers.
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Bob Brand
Bob Brand

June 17th, 2010, 4:40 pm #6

From http://www.musicrow.com/2010/06/get-low ... nashville/

1. Lay My Burden Down ¨C Alison Krauss
2. If I Didn¡¯t Care ¨C The Ink Spots
3. Jesus Come For Me ¨C The SteelDrivers
4. Sitting Mule/Drive to Town ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
5. Drive to Town for Clothes ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas and Stuart Duncan
6. No Haircut ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
7. Farewell Blues ¨C Paul Whiteman
8. Monkey Bay ¨C Jerry Douglas, Edgar Meyer & Russ Barenberg
9. Whiskey Before Breakfast ¨C The SteelDrivers
10. East Virginia Fast ¨C The SteelDrivers
11. North ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
12. Bush Shows Maddie Around ©\ Score
13. Angelina Baker ¨C The SteelDrivers
14. The Mystery of Felix ©\ Score
15. I¡¯m Looking Over A Four Leaf Clover ©\ Bix Beiderbecke (aka Billy Murray & Jean Goldkette Orchestra)
16. My Blue Heaven ¨C Gene Austin

Not one the best Bix recordings, but it will do.

I first saw Robert Duvall in one of my favorite movies in the whole world, "To Kill A Mocking Bird." Duvall played the role of Arthur "Boo" Radley. From IMDB, <em>"Arthur "Boo" Radley is the mysterious neighbor of young Jem and Scout Finch. We know that he is somehow disabled, has a violent past, and never leaves his home. While his actual character isn't revealed until the end of the movie, he serves as a dual figure of childhood fears and childhood trust. Boo Radley is a pivotal character, since he becomes the childrens' savior at the end of the film." </em>As always, Duvall adds another dimension to any film he plays in. Of course, he was terrific in "Open Range," a great western directed by Kevin Costner, the last Duvall film I saw.

Albert
Albert,

I just listened to the "...Four Leaf Clover" recording by Jean Goldkette. I think that Bix fans are going to be disappointed when they see this movie, because is is very little of Bix to be heard on this record. However, this is somewhat offset by Joe Venuti's solo performance which is terrific.

Bob
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 17th, 2010, 6:14 pm #7

From http://www.musicrow.com/2010/06/get-low ... nashville/

1. Lay My Burden Down ¨C Alison Krauss
2. If I Didn¡¯t Care ¨C The Ink Spots
3. Jesus Come For Me ¨C The SteelDrivers
4. Sitting Mule/Drive to Town ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
5. Drive to Town for Clothes ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas and Stuart Duncan
6. No Haircut ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
7. Farewell Blues ¨C Paul Whiteman
8. Monkey Bay ¨C Jerry Douglas, Edgar Meyer & Russ Barenberg
9. Whiskey Before Breakfast ¨C The SteelDrivers
10. East Virginia Fast ¨C The SteelDrivers
11. North ©\ Score ¨C Jerry Douglas
12. Bush Shows Maddie Around ©\ Score
13. Angelina Baker ¨C The SteelDrivers
14. The Mystery of Felix ©\ Score
15. I¡¯m Looking Over A Four Leaf Clover ©\ Bix Beiderbecke (aka Billy Murray & Jean Goldkette Orchestra)
16. My Blue Heaven ¨C Gene Austin

Not one the best Bix recordings, but it will do.

I first saw Robert Duvall in one of my favorite movies in the whole world, "To Kill A Mocking Bird." Duvall played the role of Arthur "Boo" Radley. From IMDB, <em>"Arthur "Boo" Radley is the mysterious neighbor of young Jem and Scout Finch. We know that he is somehow disabled, has a violent past, and never leaves his home. While his actual character isn't revealed until the end of the movie, he serves as a dual figure of childhood fears and childhood trust. Boo Radley is a pivotal character, since he becomes the childrens' savior at the end of the film." </em>As always, Duvall adds another dimension to any film he plays in. Of course, he was terrific in "Open Range," a great western directed by Kevin Costner, the last Duvall film I saw.

Albert
.... Whiteman "Farewell Blues" in the soundtrack is the Whiteman 1935 version

http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/whiteman/frwellbl.ram

or the 1923 version by The Virginians, a band within the Whiteman band.

http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/virgini ... lBlues.ram

I much prefer the 1923 version. As a matter of fact, I don't like the 1935 version. I am guessing the version in the soundtrack is from 1923. Pure, unadulterated guess.

And here is "My Blue Heaven" by Gene Austin in 1927.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w-_xbBmXJ4

Nice, sweet, mellow vocal interpretation and, to boot, the tune is terrific. Great whistling and excellent harmonization/improvisation by Gene. He is accompanied by Nat Shilkret's orchestra (abbreviated: I hear piano and cello only; see note below).  In his autobiography, Nat tells us that the record sold over a million copies.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w-_xbBmXJ4

Albert

Note: from http://www.shsu.edu/~lis_fwh/book/roots ... ustin2.htm

<em>"My Blue Heaven"was written in 1924, three years before its publication; {Walter} Donaldson wrote it one afternoon at the Friars Club in New York while waiting for his turn at the billiard table. George Whiting, then appearing in vaudeville, adapted the lyrics to the melody and used it in his act, but the song failed to attract much attention. For three years it lay in discard until Tommy Lyman, a radio singer, picked it up for use as his theme song.</em>

<em>By now, Austins arrangement with Victor regarding the choice of material to record had soured. He was convinced that the best material which he brought to the companys attention was going to other artists. In view of his own family situation, he felt this was one song he had to commit to disc. He pleaded, and finally gave Nat Shilkret an ultimatum that he wouldnt do another session unless his interpretation was commercially released. According to Austin, an agreement was reached for "My Blue Heaven" to be coupled with "Are You Thinking of Me Tonight?", the most highly regarded song among those he was planning to record at that time.</em>

<em>Austin relates that it was scheduled last on the September 14, 1927 recording agenda in order minimize potential conflicts with the Victor brass. However, as soon as satisfactory takes had been achieved for the other songs, the orchestra members put away their instruments and filed out of the studio. When Austin complained, Shilkret replied, "Im sorry Gene. I didnt know at the time I made you that promise that the musicians had another date and would have to leave. We can make it another day." H. Allen Smith, in A Short History of Fingers, documents the singers refusal to back down:</em>

<em>I grabbed an old guy with a cello and talked him into standing by. Then I grabbed a song plugger who could play pretty fair piano. And the third fellow I got was an agent who could whistle bird calls and that sort of thing. I made the record with those three.</em>

<em>When Austin proved intractable, Shilkret resigned himself to the possibility of Austins first major flop. To the contrary, however, it immediately struck a chord with the American public. Austin would later claim, in an interview published by the Los Angeles Times (March 8, 1959, Part V) that the record sold over eight million copies. The song would also have an unhappy postscript; ready to leave for St. Louis with a freshly pressed copy of "My Blue Heaven" to be united with his family, he received a telegram notifying him of the death of his newborn son.</em>

 

 
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Jamaica
Jamaica

June 17th, 2010, 7:36 pm #8

Albert,

I just listened to the "...Four Leaf Clover" recording by Jean Goldkette. I think that Bix fans are going to be disappointed when they see this movie, because is is very little of Bix to be heard on this record. However, this is somewhat offset by Joe Venuti's solo performance which is terrific.

Bob
Well, hopefully Bix fans will get to see a darn good movie, no matter the selection of Bix.
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Bob Brand
Bob Brand

June 17th, 2010, 8:21 pm #9

.... Whiteman "Farewell Blues" in the soundtrack is the Whiteman 1935 version

http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/whiteman/frwellbl.ram

or the 1923 version by The Virginians, a band within the Whiteman band.

http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/virgini ... lBlues.ram

I much prefer the 1923 version. As a matter of fact, I don't like the 1935 version. I am guessing the version in the soundtrack is from 1923. Pure, unadulterated guess.

And here is "My Blue Heaven" by Gene Austin in 1927.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w-_xbBmXJ4

Nice, sweet, mellow vocal interpretation and, to boot, the tune is terrific. Great whistling and excellent harmonization/improvisation by Gene. He is accompanied by Nat Shilkret's orchestra (abbreviated: I hear piano and cello only; see note below).  In his autobiography, Nat tells us that the record sold over a million copies.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w-_xbBmXJ4

Albert

Note: from http://www.shsu.edu/~lis_fwh/book/roots ... ustin2.htm

<em>"My Blue Heaven"was written in 1924, three years before its publication; {Walter} Donaldson wrote it one afternoon at the Friars Club in New York while waiting for his turn at the billiard table. George Whiting, then appearing in vaudeville, adapted the lyrics to the melody and used it in his act, but the song failed to attract much attention. For three years it lay in discard until Tommy Lyman, a radio singer, picked it up for use as his theme song.</em>

<em>By now, Austins arrangement with Victor regarding the choice of material to record had soured. He was convinced that the best material which he brought to the companys attention was going to other artists. In view of his own family situation, he felt this was one song he had to commit to disc. He pleaded, and finally gave Nat Shilkret an ultimatum that he wouldnt do another session unless his interpretation was commercially released. According to Austin, an agreement was reached for "My Blue Heaven" to be coupled with "Are You Thinking of Me Tonight?", the most highly regarded song among those he was planning to record at that time.</em>

<em>Austin relates that it was scheduled last on the September 14, 1927 recording agenda in order minimize potential conflicts with the Victor brass. However, as soon as satisfactory takes had been achieved for the other songs, the orchestra members put away their instruments and filed out of the studio. When Austin complained, Shilkret replied, "Im sorry Gene. I didnt know at the time I made you that promise that the musicians had another date and would have to leave. We can make it another day." H. Allen Smith, in A Short History of Fingers, documents the singers refusal to back down:</em>

<em>I grabbed an old guy with a cello and talked him into standing by. Then I grabbed a song plugger who could play pretty fair piano. And the third fellow I got was an agent who could whistle bird calls and that sort of thing. I made the record with those three.</em>

<em>When Austin proved intractable, Shilkret resigned himself to the possibility of Austins first major flop. To the contrary, however, it immediately struck a chord with the American public. Austin would later claim, in an interview published by the Los Angeles Times (March 8, 1959, Part V) that the record sold over eight million copies. The song would also have an unhappy postscript; ready to leave for St. Louis with a freshly pressed copy of "My Blue Heaven" to be united with his family, he received a telegram notifying him of the death of his newborn son.</em>

 

 
Albert,

I listened to "My Blue Heaven" by Gene Austin. Thanks for the interesting history on how this recording came to be made.

My, how singing styles have changed since long-ago 1927! Listening to this record makes me feel like I'm in a severe time warp. Mr. Austin's falsetto crooning style seems extremely dated. (I've noticed a number of other male vocalists from that era also singing in a falsetto voice). I was surprised at how weak Mr. Austin's voice was. In my opinion, the cello accompaniment is the best part of this recording. This record sold 8 million copies?!?! To my now-deceased mom and dad: I know that when you married in 1927 you didn't have much money at the time, so I hope you didn't spend any to buy this record but rather saved it for something much better--like Bing Crosby singing "Mississippi Mud" to the accompaniment of Bix.

Bob
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