Bix in the Penn State Summer Collegian, Jul 31, 1936.

Bix in the Penn State Summer Collegian, Jul 31, 1936.

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 8th, 2010, 8:33 pm #1




The earlier article was in the Jul 24, 1936 issue. Here it is.



And one more from Jul 3, 1936. Note "the best jazz musician of all time - Bix Beiderbecke."



Albert

PS I am pretty sure that the writer of these articles, EJN, is Edward J. Nichols, author of the chapter on Bix in "Jazzmen." See

http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/chapters.htm#jazzmen


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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

April 9th, 2010, 1:24 am #2

and it's very interesting - the chapter on Bix very much so, because of the immediacy of when it was written, for Bix had not even been dead for eight years. The discussion and related anecdotes by close, genuine friends and family members strike a reader as authentic, not lost in the fog of rumor and speculation.

There is at least one, perhaps two, copies of this 1939 book in Caliban Book Store down the street from my office at University of Pittsburgh. If anyone would like a copy, tell me and I will pick it up and send it to you with minimal cost. When last I saw the copies, they were in better than acceptable condition, understandably worn but not very shabby, not grubbily musty or with pages falling out. I am quite sure one copy remains of the shelf but cannot say certainly that two copies are there, as it has been several months since I checked specifically. But give a yell if anyone wants Jazzmen; it's not going for more than $7.00.

Laura
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 9th, 2010, 2:33 pm #3



The earlier article was in the Jul 24, 1936 issue. Here it is.



And one more from Jul 3, 1936. Note "the best jazz musician of all time - Bix Beiderbecke."



Albert

PS I am pretty sure that the writer of these articles, EJN, is Edward J. Nichols, author of the chapter on Bix in "Jazzmen." See

http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/chapters.htm#jazzmen

<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixbeiderbecke.com/TharpsBixPiecesPennState.jpg">

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on April 9th, 2010, 2:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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John Rowland
John Rowland

April 9th, 2010, 3:11 pm #4

and it's very interesting - the chapter on Bix very much so, because of the immediacy of when it was written, for Bix had not even been dead for eight years. The discussion and related anecdotes by close, genuine friends and family members strike a reader as authentic, not lost in the fog of rumor and speculation.

There is at least one, perhaps two, copies of this 1939 book in Caliban Book Store down the street from my office at University of Pittsburgh. If anyone would like a copy, tell me and I will pick it up and send it to you with minimal cost. When last I saw the copies, they were in better than acceptable condition, understandably worn but not very shabby, not grubbily musty or with pages falling out. I am quite sure one copy remains of the shelf but cannot say certainly that two copies are there, as it has been several months since I checked specifically. But give a yell if anyone wants Jazzmen; it's not going for more than $7.00.

Laura
Laura,

My computer won't let me send e-mail by clicking on the names. There's probably something I need to do to make it work, but I have no clue what it is. I would like a copy of the book if it is still available. Maybe you can e-mail me by clicking on my name and we can work out the payment details.

Thanks,
John
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 9th, 2010, 4:33 pm #5



The earlier article was in the Jul 24, 1936 issue. Here it is.



And one more from Jul 3, 1936. Note "the best jazz musician of all time - Bix Beiderbecke."



Albert

PS I am pretty sure that the writer of these articles, EJN, is Edward J. Nichols, author of the chapter on Bix in "Jazzmen." See

http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/chapters.htm#jazzmen

.... Mineral Industries at Penn State. Here is a short piece from the Nov 6, 1936 issue of the Penn State Collegian.



I am sure you all remember that Bud Hassler was, beginning on Nov 8, 1925, one the reed players in the St,. Louis 1925-1926 Arcadia band under the direction of Frank Trumbauer. He is to the right of Tram in the following photo,



Bix, Pee Wee and Bud attended regularly the concerts of the St. Louis Symphony in 1925-1926. Bud had been a violinist with the St. Louis Symphony. Bud played mostly tenor sax with the Trumbauer St. Louis band. Bix's attendance to the St. Louis Symphony must have been quite a musical education for Bix. The concerts covered a wide variety of styles, from the baroque era to he 20th century. With Bud Hassler to guide and explain, I would guess that Bix learned a lot about classical music during the St. Louis Symphony season.

I found the Hassler family in the 1920 US Census for St. Louis, MO. The family consisted of

Robert, 52. druggist, owner of his store

Francis, 41, druggist, co-owner

Karl, 21, student

Damon B., 16

Gerald L., 14

Helen F, 10

Joe M, 6

In his book, "City of Gabriels: The History of Jazz in St. Louis, 1895-1973" Dennis Owsley writes,

"There is a very interesting recording by the Palladeo [sic] Orchestra for OKeh on October 25, 1925, called the What-Cha-Call-'Em Blues. No one knows the personnel. There is no record of a "Palladeo" dance hall in St. Louis. This recording features a trumpet player who has listened very closely to Bix Beiderbecke. The Arcadia engagement of the Trumbauer Band started September 8, 1925."

Rust's Jazz Records lists the recording (OKeh 40521; it really is 4051), and gives the name of the band as Palledo. A streaming audio file is available from the amazing red hot jazz archive website. Listen

http://redhotjazz.com/songs/misc/whatchacallemblues.ram

I don't think the horn player sounds much like Bix, but this is late 1925 and the last time we heard him was early in 1925. But the guy does not sound like I guess Bix would have sounded on his way from early 1925 to the Fall of 1926, when he recorded again. Moreover, he plays the melody straight -no improvisation- and too many notes. Still, an interesting recording, rather advanced for its time, no? The recording is included in a Timeless CD, Jazz in St. Louis with notes by Brian Rust. He writes.

Palledo Orchestra Of St. Louis

Personnel unknown: 2 t; tb; 2 cl/as; cl/ts; vln; p; bj; bb; d. <strong>[there is a bass sax at 1:53; the instrument at 1:44 is, I believe, a violin; doesn't it sound a bit like an ocarina? ]
</strong>c. 26 October 1925; Okeh
9405-B Close Your Eyes OK 4051
9406-B What-Cha-Call-' Em Blues OK 4051,
Timeless CBC 1-036
"The other white group here is the mysterious Palledo Orchestra of St. Louis of which we know nothing beyond what the one record they made tells us (the first side of the session contains nothing in the way of jazz). A few years ago, a young friend living in St. Louis as a student did his best to find out what and where the Palledo was. There was no longer any trace."

Albert
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Lisa Ryan
Lisa Ryan

April 9th, 2010, 5:48 pm #6

... to see Bix referred to as "our legendary god" as early as 1936, but it does, and it makes
me incredibly sad.

On a less melancholy note, I have a friend in San Francisco who is a huge Bix fan (my only Bix Friend in this town!) who I've started doing some video interviews with, trying to get him on camera talking about the close friendship he had with Pee Wee Russell in the 1950's. Any suggestions for questions I might ask him?
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

April 9th, 2010, 6:55 pm #7

Laura,

My computer won't let me send e-mail by clicking on the names. There's probably something I need to do to make it work, but I have no clue what it is. I would like a copy of the book if it is still available. Maybe you can e-mail me by clicking on my name and we can work out the payment details.

Thanks,
John
Hi -- I 'll send to your email when I get home from work and we'll arrange -- I'l first check with the bookshop on Monday and pick it up (can't leave the office this afternoon). then we'll arrange, thanks!

Laura
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 9th, 2010, 7:12 pm #8

.... Mineral Industries at Penn State. Here is a short piece from the Nov 6, 1936 issue of the Penn State Collegian.



I am sure you all remember that Bud Hassler was, beginning on Nov 8, 1925, one the reed players in the St,. Louis 1925-1926 Arcadia band under the direction of Frank Trumbauer. He is to the right of Tram in the following photo,



Bix, Pee Wee and Bud attended regularly the concerts of the St. Louis Symphony in 1925-1926. Bud had been a violinist with the St. Louis Symphony. Bud played mostly tenor sax with the Trumbauer St. Louis band. Bix's attendance to the St. Louis Symphony must have been quite a musical education for Bix. The concerts covered a wide variety of styles, from the baroque era to he 20th century. With Bud Hassler to guide and explain, I would guess that Bix learned a lot about classical music during the St. Louis Symphony season.

I found the Hassler family in the 1920 US Census for St. Louis, MO. The family consisted of

Robert, 52. druggist, owner of his store

Francis, 41, druggist, co-owner

Karl, 21, student

Damon B., 16

Gerald L., 14

Helen F, 10

Joe M, 6

In his book, "City of Gabriels: The History of Jazz in St. Louis, 1895-1973" Dennis Owsley writes,

"There is a very interesting recording by the Palladeo [sic] Orchestra for OKeh on October 25, 1925, called the What-Cha-Call-'Em Blues. No one knows the personnel. There is no record of a "Palladeo" dance hall in St. Louis. This recording features a trumpet player who has listened very closely to Bix Beiderbecke. The Arcadia engagement of the Trumbauer Band started September 8, 1925."

Rust's Jazz Records lists the recording (OKeh 40521; it really is 4051), and gives the name of the band as Palledo. A streaming audio file is available from the amazing red hot jazz archive website. Listen

http://redhotjazz.com/songs/misc/whatchacallemblues.ram

I don't think the horn player sounds much like Bix, but this is late 1925 and the last time we heard him was early in 1925. But the guy does not sound like I guess Bix would have sounded on his way from early 1925 to the Fall of 1926, when he recorded again. Moreover, he plays the melody straight -no improvisation- and too many notes. Still, an interesting recording, rather advanced for its time, no? The recording is included in a Timeless CD, Jazz in St. Louis with notes by Brian Rust. He writes.

Palledo Orchestra Of St. Louis

Personnel unknown: 2 t; tb; 2 cl/as; cl/ts; vln; p; bj; bb; d. <strong>[there is a bass sax at 1:53; the instrument at 1:44 is, I believe, a violin; doesn't it sound a bit like an ocarina? ]
</strong>c. 26 October 1925; Okeh
9405-B Close Your Eyes OK 4051
9406-B What-Cha-Call-' Em Blues OK 4051,
Timeless CBC 1-036
"The other white group here is the mysterious Palledo Orchestra of St. Louis of which we know nothing beyond what the one record they made tells us (the first side of the session contains nothing in the way of jazz). A few years ago, a young friend living in St. Louis as a student did his best to find out what and where the Palledo was. There was no longer any trace."

Albert
The information about "What-Cha-Call-' Em Blues" having been issued on OK 4051 came from two sources.

1. The redhotjazz archive at http://www.redhotjazz.com/palledo.html

2. The useful compilation "Early St. Louis Recordings" by Joel Slotnikoff and Deborah Hyland in   http://www.bluesworld.com/StLouisDiscogEdit.html

Both of these are in error. Rust had it right.

Albert

 

 
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Jim Baldwin
Jim Baldwin

April 10th, 2010, 12:32 pm #9

Laura,

My computer won't let me send e-mail by clicking on the names. There's probably something I need to do to make it work, but I have no clue what it is. I would like a copy of the book if it is still available. Maybe you can e-mail me by clicking on my name and we can work out the payment details.

Thanks,
John
...23 copies over on Amazon starting at $1.52.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 10th, 2010, 12:50 pm #10

... to see Bix referred to as "our legendary god" as early as 1936, but it does, and it makes
me incredibly sad.

On a less melancholy note, I have a friend in San Francisco who is a huge Bix fan (my only Bix Friend in this town!) who I've started doing some video interviews with, trying to get him on camera talking about the close friendship he had with Pee Wee Russell in the 1950's. Any suggestions for questions I might ask him?
I am not quite sure, but I have the impression that the article was written, at least in part, in tongue-and-cheek. Note the reference to "Mr. Hassler will permit all Bix disciples to touch the hem (no, cuff) of his coat - just once." That is very much in jest, it seems to me. Also, remember that Edward Nichols was writing a column read mostly by jazz fans, and in 1936, with the renewed interest in Bix - Otis Ferguson article in the New Republic, the Victor Bix Memorial Album



a substantial fraction of jazz fans were Bix worshippers.

As far as Pee Wee, before doing your interview, if you have not done so already, I would read what Pee Wee has to say about Bix in <span><em>Hear Me Talkin' to Ya: The Story of Jazz As Told by the Men Who Made It</em> by Nat Shapiro and Nat Hentoff.</span>

<span>Albert </span>
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