A tribute to Bix. Tomorrow!!

A tribute to Bix. Tomorrow!!

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 12th, 2017, 4:35 pm #1

I hope the snow storm predicted for Monday evening/Tuesday will not interfere.
http://wbgo.org/post/bix-beiderbeckes-b ... e#stream/0

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on March 12th, 2017, 4:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Fred
Fred

March 15th, 2017, 12:57 am #2

{Greetings Mr. Haim, this submission might belong a new header line, so I submit it arbitrarily in the present thread.}

Posters in this blog know the assorted Bix Beiderbecke-milieu biographies in much more depth than me, and so I post this to query opinion... do you know that I'm mistaken? -or- might I have a correct interpretation, etc.

Consider first a choice in Wolverines' recording repertoire, on their first session after trombonist Al Glandee had left the group - "Lazy Daddy," and with solo allotted to replacement George Brunies. A subtle 'dig' at Glandee, that number?

And now, weaving numerous strands together regarding the Tram Orch recording of "Riverboat Shuffle".... Possibly I'm mistaken at the outset, but listen closely to the saxes in the band as the last measures play out ~ 2:55 to end; these follow the high flaring ensemble note of BB's. Murray's still on clarinet there in this interval among the reeds, and without looking it up I'll guess the saxes number two or three - Tram and Ryker at least. But in this closing interval, from one sax or maybe multiple, does anyone else hear sax(es) playing several measures of trilled notes?

Trilling notes in Dixieland music, that's a New Orleans clarinet device, often on a transitioning fifth. But using a sax to trill, and for extended measures like this (do I hear wrong?) - that is different... I can't readily think of another example, in jazz age saxing.

Next notice the sax breaks at 2:35 & 2:50... does anyone else hear the sound of poking-fun in those, if not mocking? And this brings me to Hoagy Carmichael's autobiography description of saxist George Johnson as "my dear friend." If I remember right (not the bio expert here, again) Carmichael did some Indiana band touring with Wolverines players the year after BB was gone from them. This warm description by Carmichael of George Johnson prompted me to wonder, if Johnson might have been held in less esteem by BB or musicians in his circle, after BB's Wolverine time.

From reading Bixography I'm aware of the BB-Voynow friction [in contrast to that the continuing working relationship between BB and Min Liebrook]. And there are the quotes attributed to BB, latter '20s, in which BB describes his Wolverine playing with near-embarrassment.

So does anyone in this blog know if latter-'20s-Tram-BB didn't share a high regard for Wolverines' George Johnson and/or Jimmy Hartwell, and might this be heard in some of the playing on Tram Orch's 1927 Riverboat Shuffle remake?
Quote
Share

Fred
Fred

March 15th, 2017, 7:28 pm #3

Young BB recorded twice an old favorite of his, ODJB's Royal Garden. Unless I mis-recall, the only other title BB's bands recoreded twice* was Carmichael's Riverboat. And whereas both Royal Gardens are rendered at a bluesy relaxed pace, BB's second wax of Riverboat is taken at dramatically different tempo... as if to be definitive in making distinction between earlier Wolverines & BB's current (subsequent) work.

*[different bands across time here, not takes; and classifying all the Whiteman units as one, be they full Potato-Head or a Frankie subgroup, so as to exclude titles like Mississippi Mud (Unless I misinterpret, Tram's last vocal interjection on the Okeh Mississippi Mud pokes a little fun toward Charlie Horvath.) ]
Quote
Share

Fred
Fred

March 16th, 2017, 12:49 am #4

First in preface, this post would never have occurred to me today, except that I was out driving around making errands in recent hours, during which time I heard an NPR news program discussing immanent election in The Netherlands... it must have been the Dutch accent in the spoken English of the radio segment's guest, which brought this movie memory to mind.

Second in preface, regarding the earlier-perpetuated BB biographical version reflecting negatively on hometown family - this has been debunked by more recent research, including that of Bixography.

So that movie now... "The Bingo Long Travelling All-Stars & Motor Kings"... all I know of it is the last half of which I chanced to witness, late-evening television, decades ago. It's about sporting. Explicitly it's about baseball, although various aspects of it bring Jazz Age black popular music to mind.

I'd done some library perusing of old jazz bio by the time of that sole encounter, and if I let my imagination run away with me a little, I can recall numerous moments in the movie where characters seen/heard onscreen remind one of particular Jazz Age musicians. Young Louis Armstrong with older Joe Oliver... Jelly Roll Morton in a scrape... Clarence Williams the business hustler.... I suppose there are others, but that's all I can remember today.

One more though.... A scene where a couple/three in the cast are sneaking around town at night, creeping through the bushes in a residential neighborhood, and their rustling is heard inside a home, through an open window.... From inside the home you then hear a Dutch-accented man say to another, "You've got coons in your garbage!"

All these posts of mine today, I recognize they're not readily responded to. On the other hand, discussions of movie portrayals have been blog fodder here previously.
Quote
Share

Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

March 18th, 2017, 1:37 am #5

Young BB recorded twice an old favorite of his, ODJB's Royal Garden. Unless I mis-recall, the only other title BB's bands recoreded twice* was Carmichael's Riverboat. And whereas both Royal Gardens are rendered at a bluesy relaxed pace, BB's second wax of Riverboat is taken at dramatically different tempo... as if to be definitive in making distinction between earlier Wolverines & BB's current (subsequent) work.

*[different bands across time here, not takes; and classifying all the Whiteman units as one, be they full Potato-Head or a Frankie subgroup, so as to exclude titles like Mississippi Mud (Unless I misinterpret, Tram's last vocal interjection on the Okeh Mississippi Mud pokes a little fun toward Charlie Horvath.) ]
Bix and His Gang recorded "Jazz Me Blues" in addition to Bix's version with the Wolverines.
Quote
Share

Fred
Fred

March 18th, 2017, 4:07 am #6

Tiger Rag also? Maybe I'm remembering NORK there. Suggestive of BB's enthusiasm for ODJB, to be sure. It is interesting to play NORK & Wolverines' Tiger Rags' back to back - nearly sounds like the same band.
Quote
Share