A New Series of Postings. "Bix Tunes. I. Baltimore.".

A New Series of Postings. "Bix Tunes. I. Baltimore.".

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 25th, 2011, 7:30 pm #1

Last edited by ahaim on June 25th, 2011, 7:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 26th, 2011, 4:05 pm #2

Last edited by ahaim on June 26th, 2011, 9:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Rob Rothberg
Rob Rothberg

June 26th, 2011, 7:03 pm #3

I've heard from other collectors that after hot takes 1 and 2, the band did one or more cooler takes with a different trumpet player. Nick, can you explain the story?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 26th, 2011, 7:52 pm #4

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 26th, 2011, 7:58 pm #5

Last edited by ahaim on June 26th, 2011, 7:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

June 26th, 2011, 9:45 pm #6

I've heard from other collectors that after hot takes 1 and 2, the band did one or more cooler takes with a different trumpet player. Nick, can you explain the story?
The band recorded takes 3, 4 and 5 of Baltimore on January 17, 1928, of which takes 3 and 4 were issued, making four issued takes in total. I have heard take 3 or take 4 (can't recall which one - it was years ago) and can confirm that the hot trumpet man is absentis!
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Rob Rothberg
Rob Rothberg

June 26th, 2011, 11:40 pm #7

A strange story, Nick. Thanks!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 27th, 2011, 4:13 pm #8


Rob's comment "A Strange Story" led me to write the following.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">The recording of a given number extending to more than one recording session happens occasionally, ordinarily, when all takes waxed on the first session are rejected. <span> </span>A good example is Paul Whiteman's recording of From Monday On. The first session when this number was recorded dates from Feb 13, 1928. Three takes were waxed. <span> </span>Takes 1 and 2 were destroyed. Take 3 was first marked "hold conditional." Later this was crossed out with a red pencil and reclassified as "master." This take was not released until Dec 12, 1941, Vic 27688.
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<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
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<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">In the meantime, on Feb 28, 1928, Whiteman recorded takes 4-6 of the tune. Take 6 was mastered and released on Aug 13, 1928, Victor 21274. [See note 1]
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<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Vic 21274 is then the <em>first </em>issue of <em>From Monday On: </em>it was released at the time the various takes were waxed on Feb 13 and 28, 1928. It must be noted that matrix numbers for all six takes are the same, 41689-X (X = 1-6).
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<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">What follows is a different situation. It is not uncommon for a band leader to record the same tune more than once within a relatively short time, even though the first recording was issued. This has to do with contractual obligations with different recording companies. Red Nichols was a master at this game. For example, on Aug 15, 1927, Red Nichols and His Five Pennies recorded "Feelin' No Pain" issued as Br 6326. A couple of months later, on Oct 12, 1927, Red and Miff Stompers recorded the same tune, issued on Vic 21183.
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<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">However, I don't remember having seen a record that was issued being recorded again, at a later date but within a relatively short time from the first [see note 2], for the<em> same </em>record label and by the <em>same</em> band, using the <em>same</em> matrix number. This, apparently, is the case of the multiple recordings of Baltimore by Syd Roy's Lyricals. They first recorded the tune in Dec 1927, perhaps earlier, and it was released on Imperial 1836. Nick tells us, <span>The band recorded takes 3, 4 and 5 of Baltimore on January 17, 1928, of which takes 3 and 4 were issued, making four issued takes in total. </span><span>So this is an example of a recording that was issued contemporaneously with the recording; nevertheless, additional takes were waxed by the same band for the same company within a few weeks of the first session, using the same matrix number (4767-X, X = 1-5).</span>
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<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Questions: 1. Why was this done? 2. Are other examples of recordings for which additional takes were made at a later date even though takes from the first session had been issued?</span>
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<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Albert
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<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Note 1. Take 4 was classified as hold indefinitely and released on Jul 30, 1936, Victor 25368 as part of the Victor Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Album.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Note 2. For example, Whiteman first recorded <em>San</em> on June 9, 1924, and again, on Jan 12, 1928. This is the case of two entirely different recordings (with different matrix numbers) , not different takes of the same tune within a short time period.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 27th, 2011, 6:35 pm #9


First, a correction to the identification of Jimmy Dorsey in the record label of  Vic 27688. We discusssed this before. Jimmy Dorsey had left Whiteman by the time the first "From Monday On" session took place. The arrangement is by Matty Malneck.

<strong>The Bass Players in Take 3 - Victor 27688. </strong>According to Rayno we have Mike Trafficante on brass bass and Steve Brown on string bass. Listen http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENmvBU3D7i8 Brown very prominent behind the brass trio. I also hear Trafficante.

<strong>The Bass Players in Take 6 - Victor 21274, Take 4 - 25368.  </strong>According to Rayno we have Min Leibrook on bass sax and Mike Trafficante on brass bass. Rayno tells us that "Leibrook plays the bass sax throughout" and "perhaps due to the overwhelming presence of Liebrook's bass-sax, the tuba is not audible at any point. Listen

take 6 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHyacOXvZcI 

take 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGLzavnTgQA

Indeed , Leibrook  dominant. Can anyone hear the brass bass? Perhaps behind Crosby's vocal?

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on June 28th, 2011, 2:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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David Lee Gordon
David Lee Gordon

July 4th, 2011, 11:51 pm #10

You must have noticed that the sheet music of Baltimore has a photo of Doree Leslie (as a child) on the cover. Doree appeared on several covers of sheet music in the 1920s.









Doree was a child dancing phenomenon and in her teens played an ingenue in musicals. She made a Vitaphone short, Let's Merge, in 1930. She was in the cast two Broadway musicals.

 "Manhattan Mary (1927-1928 with Keenan Wynn and  Mae Clark [Jimmy Cagney pushed a grapefruit on her face in  "The Public Enemy," she was also in the orignal 1931 Frankenstein movie, she played Elizabeth].

"Simple Simon" (1930 a Ziegfield production with muisc by Rodgers and lyrics by Hart.)

Doree Leslie was a member of the cast of  Ed Wynn's "The Grab Bag," a big hit in Chicago in 1925. The production of this musical revue was brought to Davenport (connection to Bix!!) in Nov 1925. <font face="Times New Roman">Doree Leslie is described as "a clever dancer from vaudeville."</font>

Walter Winchell carrried a brief announcment of the marriage of Doree Leslie to a New York businessman  in one of his columns in May 1929. SDoree must have been from Detroit because the wedding took place in Detroit. In about 1930 or 31 she gave up her acting career.

Albert
I am the grandson of Doree Leslie. I'm not sure why she married my grandfather, Lee Gordon, in Detroit, but she had no ties to that city that I know of. She was born in Boston and lived mainly in Boston and NYC, where she was in fact a child actor. Lee Gordon was born and raised in Chicago. He worked for a time in NYC and that's where he met Doree. After they married, they settled in Chicago. Both of her sons were born and raised in Chicago and both were Mayo Clinic-trained physicians, one in Phoenix and the other in Miami.
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