A modern "In a Mist"

A modern "In a Mist"

Mark Gabrish Conlan
Mark Gabrish Conlan

April 6th, 2017, 2:45 pm #1

A modern version of Bix's "In a Mist" by a band called Old Time Musketry: I think they rushed the opening but otherwise this is interesting, especially when the clarinetist improvises. If nothing else, it shows how "modern" Bix was and how far ahead of his time!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYL6_zHqc9k
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 6th, 2017, 3:13 pm #2

.... from 3 min on, in my opinion of course; I find it unbearable.

Albert
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

April 6th, 2017, 3:49 pm #3

A modern version of Bix's "In a Mist" by a band called Old Time Musketry: I think they rushed the opening but otherwise this is interesting, especially when the clarinetist improvises. If nothing else, it shows how "modern" Bix was and how far ahead of his time!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYL6_zHqc9k
That's an interesting interpretation - and Bix's music should surely always be open to interpretation - but personally I prefer this piano and clarinet take on the subject:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijdyqKzJQTU

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Jim Petersen
Jim Petersen

April 6th, 2017, 5:19 pm #4

A modern version of Bix's "In a Mist" by a band called Old Time Musketry: I think they rushed the opening but otherwise this is interesting, especially when the clarinetist improvises. If nothing else, it shows how "modern" Bix was and how far ahead of his time!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYL6_zHqc9k
As I listened to the first section, I thought it was great that these younger guys would think enough of Bix's music to do this number and put it on Youtube. We definitely need younger people involved with this ("our?") music. I thought the first section was a bit too fast but pleasant enough and liked the slow part very much, but like Albert, that last section was like fingernails scratching on the chalk board for me and I bailed out before it was finished. No offense to anyone who likes that kind of jazz, just not ever my preference.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 6th, 2017, 7:46 pm #5

That's an interesting interpretation - and Bix's music should surely always be open to interpretation - but personally I prefer this piano and clarinet take on the subject:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijdyqKzJQTU
.... vibraphone.

Albert
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Nick Sigismondi
Nick Sigismondi

April 6th, 2017, 9:01 pm #6

A modern version of Bix's "In a Mist" by a band called Old Time Musketry: I think they rushed the opening but otherwise this is interesting, especially when the clarinetist improvises. If nothing else, it shows how "modern" Bix was and how far ahead of his time!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYL6_zHqc9k
I'm 63 years old - pretty far gone by most standards; but compared to me (& Mark of course)you guys are REALLY moldy figs as they used to say. I don't get first of all your disdain Albert for anything in Jazz past oh say 1938; let alone the idea of someone else "defaming" Bix by putting their own spin on his compositions. I'm sure Bix himself would find this attitude funny as he had BIG EARS for ALL kinds of music. No offense but try not to be so dogmatic and dig these kids for their dedication and obvious talent; I personally thought the interpretation was top notch and the improvised section was a real added bonus that shows how DEEP these guys dug into the music to show the possibilities of what is there in the original.
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

April 6th, 2017, 9:18 pm #7

.... vibraphone.

Albert
Yes, sorry, vibraphone! My brain was obviously in a fog!
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David Tenner
David Tenner

April 7th, 2017, 12:14 am #8

I'm 63 years old - pretty far gone by most standards; but compared to me (& Mark of course)you guys are REALLY moldy figs as they used to say. I don't get first of all your disdain Albert for anything in Jazz past oh say 1938; let alone the idea of someone else "defaming" Bix by putting their own spin on his compositions. I'm sure Bix himself would find this attitude funny as he had BIG EARS for ALL kinds of music. No offense but try not to be so dogmatic and dig these kids for their dedication and obvious talent; I personally thought the interpretation was top notch and the improvised section was a real added bonus that shows how DEEP these guys dug into the music to show the possibilities of what is there in the original.
"He [Coleman Hawkins] returned to Norway after his Swedish bookings ended and played for six days (until 9 February [1963]) at the Metropol Jazz Club in Oslo...The American author H.O. Brunn (who wrote *The Story of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band*) called in to the Metropol and asked, with a certain misguided boldness, 'When are you going to start to play jazz again, Mr Hawkins?' Hawk treated this inane statement with humour, saying, 'According to you I must have stopped playing jazz forty years ago!'" https://books.google.com/books?id=54EX2a-kfiUC&pg=PA346

Honestly, the clarinet improvisation that is objected to here would not have been particularly avant-garde or far out in 1963...
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Mark Gabrish Conlan
Mark Gabrish Conlan

April 7th, 2017, 6:12 am #9

Yes, sorry, vibraphone! My brain was obviously in a fog!
Judging from the overall arrangement and the fact that it comes from an album called "Benny Rides Again" (as in Benny Goodman), this is obviously a tribute to the great record Red Norvo made of "In a Mist" on November 21, 1933 with Norvo on xylophone, Benny Goodman on bass clarinet (one of his rare recordings on that instrument), Dick McDonough on guitar and Artie Bernstein on bass: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UdBqYW_Tp_Y

Norvo's "In a Mist" has long been one of my very favorite versions of the piece, along with Bix's and Ralph Sutton's on solo piano and Manny Albam's band arrangement.
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

April 7th, 2017, 10:56 am #10

I'm 63 years old - pretty far gone by most standards; but compared to me (& Mark of course)you guys are REALLY moldy figs as they used to say. I don't get first of all your disdain Albert for anything in Jazz past oh say 1938; let alone the idea of someone else "defaming" Bix by putting their own spin on his compositions. I'm sure Bix himself would find this attitude funny as he had BIG EARS for ALL kinds of music. No offense but try not to be so dogmatic and dig these kids for their dedication and obvious talent; I personally thought the interpretation was top notch and the improvised section was a real added bonus that shows how DEEP these guys dug into the music to show the possibilities of what is there in the original.
As far as I can see, Albert was simply expressing his personal opinion about what is, after all, a subjective matter, and as if to stress this fact he clearly stated that his dislike for the piece in question was "in my opinion of course". I didn't find his attitude dogmatic. I wouldn't mind betting that there are many pieces of music that you don't like - does this mean you are dogmatic?

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