A Highly Significant Historic Document ....

A Highly Significant Historic Document ....

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 7th, 2012, 5:38 pm #1


.... through the courtesy of jazz historian Ate van Delden. Thanks a lot, Ate. I appreciate your generosity.

The Sep 8, 1923 issue of the Daily Star, Brooklyn, New York gives an account of the plans to open the Cinderella.

<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixbeiderbecke.com/19230908Brook ... erella.JPG">

The New York Evening Telegram of Sep 23, 1923 has an ad for the opening of the Cinderella.

<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixbeiderbecke.com/19230923NewYo ... rella1.JPG">

Note that the ballroom was called "Cinderella Dancing" and was located on the second floor of the building at 1600 Broadway.

According to the redhotjazz archive, thanks to the wealth of his dad Otto, Roger Wolfe Kahn was able to buy the Arthur Lange orchestra. Here is what Lange's  orchestra sounded like in 1922.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIf0Z0w8b4A

And here is what Gene Fosdick's band sounded like in 1923.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QOKU8-Ba48

A big improvement in 1924 when the Wolverines had their engagement, and in 1927 when Rollini's New Yorkers played in the same ballroom re-named Club New Yorker.

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on August 8th, 2012, 12:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

August 8th, 2012, 12:53 am #2

It kind of wanged and wailed, but I have so many 78 records from that year which sort of blather along in mediocrity, and this was a few steps up. And boy, did I love the ambience of that Victrola and the vermilion-red Vocalian record spinning on it. Really enjoyed it.

SO, Albert and everyone, let's hear your reports on the Bix Fest and how you all enjoyed yourselves, any new scoop, was the hot weather bearable, what bands you liked best, etc.

Laura
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 8th, 2012, 2:10 pm #3


Wonderful montage of Bix memorabilia.



Albert

PS I have a brief report in a thread above. I am swamped with work at home and at the university. I hope a forumite who attended the festival could provide more details.
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Jim Petersen
Jim Petersen

August 8th, 2012, 5:18 pm #4

Albert mentioned the gravesite service and the paraphrased version of "I'll Be A Friend With Pleasure" I read for the crowd. Anyone could do what I did, but in case someone might find it interesting here it is!

Right from the start-------you played a part
We gave our hearts---------with pleasure

Solo's with style and finesse----brings happiness
Thousands answered "yes"-----with pleasure

Sunset till dawn------though you are gone
Dreams linger on----we treasure

If you contend------this is the end
We'll always be your friend----with pleasure

This tune was Rich Johnson's favorite as well as Gerri Bowers and it's right up there with myself as well...now that I can hear it without getting a big lump in my throat. As I've written before, I doubt Bix ever had a better friend that Rich Johnson.

Also at the gravesite, Rick Sundin sang "The Hymn of Promise" while Ray Davis released 4 white doves (actually white Racing Homer Pigeons) to signify the past 4 decades of the Bix Festival. As Albert also reported, Jim Cullen's band played both Bix and Hoagy Carmichael tunes that were very appropriate for the occassion....and they played them very well!
Best wishes to all Bix fans,
Jim Petersen
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Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

August 9th, 2012, 9:12 pm #5

As per Albert's request for someone else to write about the 41st Bix Fest....

Performances by Andy Schumm and His Flatland Gang and the Josh Duffee Orchestra were hugely attended and received frequent applause and aways standing ovations. Andy & Josh just get better and better, which is hard to imagine, but still true. There was a lot of interesting new material in their playlists without getting too far from the purpose of the Bix Fest. Jim Cullen's last stage performance and presentation at the Bix Liturgy service were very moving. I especially remember his saying that if it hadn't been for Bix Beiderbecke, he would have been in another line of life's work. He especially concentrated on Bix's standard tunes in his last stage appearance. His substitute clarinetist, Evan Arntzen, was extraordinary and Hal Smith held down the drums admirably, as did Andy's guest bassist (filling in for Vince Giardano, so to speak) Beau Samson, who was also very talented, as were all of the musicians.

A particularly moving performance was the "Future of Jazz Set," with Andy Schumm and Dave Bock, and guest clarinetist Dave Bennett in the front line. Josh Duffee was there, too, of course, and the whole ensemble just came out, no music in front of them, and blew from the heart. It was a very joyful performance of pure improvisation, and they seemed to be having as much fun as we were.

The young dancers who performed on the adjacent dance floors in the Adler and Rivercenter added a lot of visual interest as they danced the period dances of the 1920s and early 1930s as only the very young can and also got a lot of the rest of the, er, more mature audience out on the dance floor, too!

Gerri Bowers bus tour hit all the Bix spots in town--with time inside Dreamland and the Beiderbecke home and a photo op the Beiderbecke Inn, a nice addition to the events. Except for a much needed heavy rainstorm that blew through for a few minutes, the weather was very agreeable, warm but not too hot at all. The family, volunteers of the BBMS, and the facility staff couldn't have been more helpful. They was so much good music it was impossible to get around to all of it.

The 41st Festival went a long way toward equalling the epic 40th Fest, which is hard to imagine!

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Mel Thompson
Mel Thompson

August 9th, 2012, 9:37 pm #6

Glenda's post covers it all, and I'd like to add another highlight: during the locations tour, the stop at Bix's family church included a very moving performance by a woman portraying Bix's mother. Her monologue included not only basic biographical information, but what could have been the thoughts and feelings of a proud yet ultimately saddened mother. I found it unexpectedly moving. It was also a huge pleasure to see friends from past Bix Festivals and make some new ones. I'm hoping someone will post details about the cylinder recording that Andy and others made at Bix's house during the Festival.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 9th, 2012, 9:58 pm #7


.... Andy Schumm's facebook site.



Enrico is the driving force behind the project.

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 10th, 2012, 6:27 pm #8


.... relative positions of the musicians with respect to the recording horn. The instrument farthest away is the cornet, the closest is the banjo. Interesting.

Albert
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Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

August 11th, 2012, 2:25 am #9

As per Albert's request for someone else to write about the 41st Bix Fest....

Performances by Andy Schumm and His Flatland Gang and the Josh Duffee Orchestra were hugely attended and received frequent applause and aways standing ovations. Andy & Josh just get better and better, which is hard to imagine, but still true. There was a lot of interesting new material in their playlists without getting too far from the purpose of the Bix Fest. Jim Cullen's last stage performance and presentation at the Bix Liturgy service were very moving. I especially remember his saying that if it hadn't been for Bix Beiderbecke, he would have been in another line of life's work. He especially concentrated on Bix's standard tunes in his last stage appearance. His substitute clarinetist, Evan Arntzen, was extraordinary and Hal Smith held down the drums admirably, as did Andy's guest bassist (filling in for Vince Giardano, so to speak) Beau Samson, who was also very talented, as were all of the musicians.

A particularly moving performance was the "Future of Jazz Set," with Andy Schumm and Dave Bock, and guest clarinetist Dave Bennett in the front line. Josh Duffee was there, too, of course, and the whole ensemble just came out, no music in front of them, and blew from the heart. It was a very joyful performance of pure improvisation, and they seemed to be having as much fun as we were.

The young dancers who performed on the adjacent dance floors in the Adler and Rivercenter added a lot of visual interest as they danced the period dances of the 1920s and early 1930s as only the very young can and also got a lot of the rest of the, er, more mature audience out on the dance floor, too!

Gerri Bowers bus tour hit all the Bix spots in town--with time inside Dreamland and the Beiderbecke home and a photo op the Beiderbecke Inn, a nice addition to the events. Except for a much needed heavy rainstorm that blew through for a few minutes, the weather was very agreeable, warm but not too hot at all. The family, volunteers of the BBMS, and the facility staff couldn't have been more helpful. They was so much good music it was impossible to get around to all of it.

The 41st Festival went a long way toward equalling the epic 40th Fest, which is hard to imagine!
Pardon my error. The last name of the bassist I mentioned is Sample, not Samson. Sorry!
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Jim Petersen
Jim Petersen

August 11th, 2012, 3:14 pm #10

Glenda's post covers it all, and I'd like to add another highlight: during the locations tour, the stop at Bix's family church included a very moving performance by a woman portraying Bix's mother. Her monologue included not only basic biographical information, but what could have been the thoughts and feelings of a proud yet ultimately saddened mother. I found it unexpectedly moving. It was also a huge pleasure to see friends from past Bix Festivals and make some new ones. I'm hoping someone will post details about the cylinder recording that Andy and others made at Bix's house during the Festival.
during the Bix Bus tour would have introduced themselves. I would have loved to shake the hand of other Bix fan. Seems like I might have even purchased a book from one of you a couple of years back?

Wendy Hemmen does a wonderful job as Mrs. Beiderbecke. I've seen it 3 times now and I'm always moved by it. I was very pleased when she consented to do it for us during the bus tour. Glad you appreciated it too, Mel.
Best regards,
Jim Petersen
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