Let's talk a little vintage American made Co2 rifles here!

Let's talk a little vintage American made Co2 rifles here!

Joined: June 21st, 2010, 7:06 pm

January 27th, 2012, 8:14 pm #1

What are your favorites?

I'm thinking of airguns like the old, Sheridan F, the Crosman 160 and 167, Crosman 180, and the slightly newer, Benji-Sheridan G397, etc.

I've owned 3 Sheridan model C's in the past, but I always wanted one of the old Sheridan Model F's but never got around to getting one. They always felt really well balanced to me, and along with the nice Walnut wood, and the fact that it is more "user friendly" for scope mounting, since you don't have to pump it, all seemed like big "plus's" it had going for it.

And the Crosman 160 and 167 are sure nice too! I really like the blonde-colored wood that Crosman used on their airgun stocks in the 60's and 70's. Too me, that light colored, blonde wood, just "screams" "classic Crosman" to me!

What are likes and dislikes in the vintage, American Co2 rifle category?

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Joined: August 22nd, 2005, 4:00 am

January 27th, 2012, 8:22 pm #2

Haven't shot one in ages. Tim Macmurray did some great work on the Model F rifles with bulk filling attachments.

Edit: Guns in picture below are NIB and do not have bulk fill.

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Joined: August 13th, 2004, 7:24 pm

January 27th, 2012, 8:29 pm #3

What are your favorites?

I'm thinking of airguns like the old, Sheridan F, the Crosman 160 and 167, Crosman 180, and the slightly newer, Benji-Sheridan G397, etc.

I've owned 3 Sheridan model C's in the past, but I always wanted one of the old Sheridan Model F's but never got around to getting one. They always felt really well balanced to me, and along with the nice Walnut wood, and the fact that it is more "user friendly" for scope mounting, since you don't have to pump it, all seemed like big "plus's" it had going for it.

And the Crosman 160 and 167 are sure nice too! I really like the blonde-colored wood that Crosman used on their airgun stocks in the 60's and 70's. Too me, that light colored, blonde wood, just "screams" "classic Crosman" to me!

What are likes and dislikes in the vintage, American Co2 rifle category?

You are talking my favorite subject. For some reason I am most attracted to the CO-2 guns and I have most of the ones you listed. Those guns were very well made and most were very accurate. I have pumpers and spring guns but always find myself grabbing one of the CO-2 guns to do some plinking.
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Joined: July 30th, 2008, 11:24 pm

January 27th, 2012, 8:34 pm #4

What are your favorites?

I'm thinking of airguns like the old, Sheridan F, the Crosman 160 and 167, Crosman 180, and the slightly newer, Benji-Sheridan G397, etc.

I've owned 3 Sheridan model C's in the past, but I always wanted one of the old Sheridan Model F's but never got around to getting one. They always felt really well balanced to me, and along with the nice Walnut wood, and the fact that it is more "user friendly" for scope mounting, since you don't have to pump it, all seemed like big "plus's" it had going for it.

And the Crosman 160 and 167 are sure nice too! I really like the blonde-colored wood that Crosman used on their airgun stocks in the 60's and 70's. Too me, that light colored, blonde wood, just "screams" "classic Crosman" to me!

What are likes and dislikes in the vintage, American Co2 rifle category?

That was a great gun. The later ones were the best I think. Easy to use peep site, dual CO2 cartage's, sling swivels, full size weight, adjustable trigger, and of course in the common .22 caliber. Lets also not forget the risk of barrel separation from the rear site on the Sheridan F/FB models either!!

I am a Sheridan fan all the way, but will concede the 160 was a great gun, but I don't think it was in production when the F model came out. So when you had to buy a new gun back in the day there really was only one choice depending on what year you were buying in.

If you have the time to tinker I still will favor the Sheridan. It can shoot great and get decent shots per fill...but still, out of the box, the 160 Crosman wins.

-Mark
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Joined: July 30th, 2008, 11:24 pm

January 27th, 2012, 8:35 pm #5

Haven't shot one in ages. Tim Macmurray did some great work on the Model F rifles with bulk filling attachments.

Edit: Guns in picture below are NIB and do not have bulk fill.

Nice looking guns there ;-).....nt
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Joined: August 12th, 2008, 9:24 pm

January 27th, 2012, 8:37 pm #6

What are your favorites?

I'm thinking of airguns like the old, Sheridan F, the Crosman 160 and 167, Crosman 180, and the slightly newer, Benji-Sheridan G397, etc.

I've owned 3 Sheridan model C's in the past, but I always wanted one of the old Sheridan Model F's but never got around to getting one. They always felt really well balanced to me, and along with the nice Walnut wood, and the fact that it is more "user friendly" for scope mounting, since you don't have to pump it, all seemed like big "plus's" it had going for it.

And the Crosman 160 and 167 are sure nice too! I really like the blonde-colored wood that Crosman used on their airgun stocks in the 60's and 70's. Too me, that light colored, blonde wood, just "screams" "classic Crosman" to me!

What are likes and dislikes in the vintage, American Co2 rifle category?

The 180 is a great little gun, just enough power to hunt squirrels and such. The 400 is a lot of fun, though you're limited to wadcutters (I never tried round balls in the one I had, but I've heard they work well.
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Joined: June 12th, 2011, 2:10 pm

January 27th, 2012, 8:55 pm #7

Haven't shot one in ages. Tim Macmurray did some great work on the Model F rifles with bulk filling attachments.

Edit: Guns in picture below are NIB and do not have bulk fill.

Im still waiting for my model F to get back from Tim for conversion to bulkfill. What kind of velocity are you getting with a certain weight pellet? When I filled mine with the 20 oz paintball tank it took 57grams of gas in like 6 seconds. Real easy to fill. Does yours group accurately?
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Joined: June 21st, 2010, 7:06 pm

January 27th, 2012, 9:31 pm #8

Haven't shot one in ages. Tim Macmurray did some great work on the Model F rifles with bulk filling attachments.

Edit: Guns in picture below are NIB and do not have bulk fill.

Want to sell me one of them?

I especially like the one on the very bottom!

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Joined: June 21st, 2010, 7:06 pm

January 27th, 2012, 9:36 pm #9

You are talking my favorite subject. For some reason I am most attracted to the CO-2 guns and I have most of the ones you listed. Those guns were very well made and most were very accurate. I have pumpers and spring guns but always find myself grabbing one of the CO-2 guns to do some plinking.
Right now, my only Co2 gun is a QB78 Deluxe, and while it is just a "copy" of the Crosman 160, it is nonetheless, a really enjoyable rifle to shoot!

I really feel strongly that most "new" shooters would be better served, to try out a nice Co2 rifle before trying springers, PCP's, pumpers, etc, because they are so easy to shoot well, and tend to be light and handy, and usually affordable.

What are some of your "likes" and "preferences" that you have in your various brands and models?

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Joined: June 21st, 2010, 7:06 pm

January 27th, 2012, 9:40 pm #10

That was a great gun. The later ones were the best I think. Easy to use peep site, dual CO2 cartage's, sling swivels, full size weight, adjustable trigger, and of course in the common .22 caliber. Lets also not forget the risk of barrel separation from the rear site on the Sheridan F/FB models either!!

I am a Sheridan fan all the way, but will concede the 160 was a great gun, but I don't think it was in production when the F model came out. So when you had to buy a new gun back in the day there really was only one choice depending on what year you were buying in.

If you have the time to tinker I still will favor the Sheridan. It can shoot great and get decent shots per fill...but still, out of the box, the 160 Crosman wins.

-Mark
I had never heard of the rear sight, barrel separation thing you mentioned, about the Sheridan F?

Is that pretty common? Easy fix or no?
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