Filling a Crosman 106, and a 114 with a fire extinguisher

Filling a Crosman 106, and a 114 with a fire extinguisher

Joined: August 12th, 2008, 9:24 pm

February 6th, 2012, 2:38 am #1

My job gives me acess to C02 fire extinguishers and high pressure steel braided hose and fittings. I recently aquired a Crosman 106 and 114 bulk fill guns and have tried refilling them with a 5lb C02 extinguisher. It seems like the guns won't take a charge even hough there is no gas leaking from any of the connections from the extinguisher to the fill port (I'm using steel braided hose with 1/8 fittings, and I've tried filling the guns cocked, uncocked, the extinguisher upright and inverted, as well as the guns. Any advice is greatly appreciated
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: May 17th, 2004, 4:36 pm

February 6th, 2012, 3:24 am #2

Cock the gun before filling. Keep the fire extinguisher upright as I assume it has a dip (siphon) tube in it to get the liquid off the bottom. It helps if the gun is a tad colder than the fill tank although that's not always possible. With the gun cocked, it should fill.

"but I'll be needin' that gun, fer squirrels and such."
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: May 13th, 2005, 8:02 pm

February 6th, 2012, 3:36 pm #3

My job gives me acess to C02 fire extinguishers and high pressure steel braided hose and fittings. I recently aquired a Crosman 106 and 114 bulk fill guns and have tried refilling them with a 5lb C02 extinguisher. It seems like the guns won't take a charge even hough there is no gas leaking from any of the connections from the extinguisher to the fill port (I'm using steel braided hose with 1/8 fittings, and I've tried filling the guns cocked, uncocked, the extinguisher upright and inverted, as well as the guns. Any advice is greatly appreciated
The fittings on the bulk fill Crosman's are 1/8 STRAIGHT not NPT. I have seen folks destroy their fittings on the gun attempting to make the npt work. I have also seen folks being very careful and permanently (well, whatever that pink stuff is) mounting an npt fitting into the end of their guns.

Personally I use the old 10 ounce tanks that Crosman originally supplied with the guns. The nipples on the tanks seem to be a little more rugged and can accept a fill from a larger tank even though you will likely be filling with an npt fitting.

I found a machinist friend who built an adapter, and yes, he laughed like hell when he learned it was for "bb guns". After shooting my 118 he changed his tune and thinks they are "right bit of fun".






Reply
Like
Share

Joined: July 22nd, 2011, 4:46 am

February 6th, 2012, 4:30 pm #4

My job gives me acess to C02 fire extinguishers and high pressure steel braided hose and fittings. I recently aquired a Crosman 106 and 114 bulk fill guns and have tried refilling them with a 5lb C02 extinguisher. It seems like the guns won't take a charge even hough there is no gas leaking from any of the connections from the extinguisher to the fill port (I'm using steel braided hose with 1/8 fittings, and I've tried filling the guns cocked, uncocked, the extinguisher upright and inverted, as well as the guns. Any advice is greatly appreciated
Don't worry about the threading issue. That's a well worn myth about these guns. The threading that locks doesn't start to lock until well after where a bulk fill head fits.

First: be sure to weigh the gun before and after filling. That's the only way to determine the amount of liquid CO2 in the gun. Weighing allows you to refine your filling technique.

Especially where you have CO2 to burn, the best method is to:

1) attach the gun, leave the gun UNCOCKED and slowing open the CO2 tank valve. This allows the CO2 to flow through the gun. Do this until snow (liquid CO2) shows coming out the barrel. This allows the gaseous CO2 and air in the gun to escape, it also chills the gun. If the gun is warm, liquid CO2 will immediately turn gaseous upon entering the gun.

2) Turn off the CO2 tank valve.

3) Cock the gun.

4) Turn on the CO2 tank valve.

5) Turn off the CO2 tank valve

6) detach gun from CO2 tank

7) weigh gun difference between before and after weighing is the weight of liquid CO2
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: August 12th, 2008, 9:24 pm

February 6th, 2012, 9:30 pm #5

The 114 is taking a charge, holds and shoots just fine. The 106 has a leak. I'll try some Pellgun oil and run a hair dryer in the general area of the valve stem to see if it'll seal up. The threads on the hose fitting are 1/8 straight.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: May 13th, 2005, 8:02 pm

February 7th, 2012, 6:17 am #6

Don't worry about the threading issue. That's a well worn myth about these guns. The threading that locks doesn't start to lock until well after where a bulk fill head fits.

First: be sure to weigh the gun before and after filling. That's the only way to determine the amount of liquid CO2 in the gun. Weighing allows you to refine your filling technique.

Especially where you have CO2 to burn, the best method is to:

1) attach the gun, leave the gun UNCOCKED and slowing open the CO2 tank valve. This allows the CO2 to flow through the gun. Do this until snow (liquid CO2) shows coming out the barrel. This allows the gaseous CO2 and air in the gun to escape, it also chills the gun. If the gun is warm, liquid CO2 will immediately turn gaseous upon entering the gun.

2) Turn off the CO2 tank valve.

3) Cock the gun.

4) Turn on the CO2 tank valve.

5) Turn off the CO2 tank valve

6) detach gun from CO2 tank

7) weigh gun difference between before and after weighing is the weight of liquid CO2
Dean your idiocy sometimes amazes me.






Reply
Like
Share

Joined: July 22nd, 2011, 4:46 am

February 7th, 2012, 8:15 pm #7

If you disagree with something I've written, feel free to bring up the specifics rather than resorting to just being rude.

If this has to do with the threading of the bulk fill gun fittings, A few years ago, I wrote a long article detailing exactly why it makes absolutely no difference to attaching these guns.

Reply
Like
Share

Joined: May 13th, 2005, 8:02 pm

February 7th, 2012, 11:05 pm #8

.






Reply
Like
Share

Joined: July 22nd, 2011, 4:46 am

February 8th, 2012, 12:47 am #9

Don't care how much you think I'm wrong on a technical issue, that is zero excuse for being rude.

I can prove my point, you can't.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: May 13th, 2005, 8:02 pm

February 8th, 2012, 2:56 am #10

NPT is a tapered thread. This means that the first 3 - 5 threads are not the full diameter as a 1/8 straight thread. On average the first 2 or 3 threads of an NPT fitting do not engage the threads of a fill head on a bulk fill Crosman. Having only one or two threads partially engaged under CO2 pressures is simply not safe. Additionally those one or two threads that do catch the fill head are still slightly tapered and can easily damage the threads on the fill head itself.

A straight threaded fitting will fully engage at least 4 full threads before bottoming out in the fill head. Therefore making it enormously safer to charge your gun. And of course can cause no damage to your fill head.

Since the fill heads only have about 6 threads to them a straight threaded nipple was chosen for the 10 ounce tanks over a tapered thread to ensure safe operation.

It ain't exactly rocket science. But if you feel good about stripping out threads and hanging on by only one; feel free.






Reply
Like
Share