Crosman 101 rebop...

Crosman 101 rebop...

Joined: May 22nd, 2007, 3:28 pm

July 1st, 2012, 5:18 pm #1

Hi guys!

Waiting on return of upgraded parts plus new goodies from Rick Wilnecker at Precision Pellet for my dear old '46 Crosman 101. She was in ruff shape, which is a little below rough.

All finish had to be stripped from metal & wood. Metal beneath is 98%, a very few tiny pits. Wood stained by wet environment, butt plate iron bled into wood leaving large black stains. Also something rested on buttstock to leave very strange orange colored marks and splotches all over one side, which also caused minor but noticeable indentation at each mark, weird. Somebody also decided to scribe on stock in a couple of places with a fine point indelible black marker, ain't it great?!

Oxalic acid 2 tblspn per 1/2 Q hot water removed black iron stain in about 60 minutes soak, but not orange or black marker. You can also mix oxalic & water as a paste for spot application. Tried sodium hypoclorite bleach, no go. Had to sand out the orange spots and black marker. Wood is very light color, hard as a canon ball, tight grain, maybe elm?

Stock is a very bad fit to receiver. Have to file wood to match receiver butt's metal vertical divider at bolt hole, plus inlet wood for outer rim area of receiver casting & add gasket to hopefully pull wood into receiver & tighten & true up fitment, hopefully...

After 2 hours scrubby-scrubby bore is sweet, good rifling, no pits! Very tip of barrel at crown still has visible red paint. May polish crown & touch up red paint, may be okay as is. Bolt fits tight, prod a little rough. Air chamber nicely polished, no rust or pits, but obviously not seamless tubing. May leave receiver aluminum polished w/ semigloss clear coat or may do semigloss black Rustoleum, probably the latter.

Wondering here: I have a Hoppe's Gun Blue Kit #1700. Any hope that with a good polish like 1,500 grit emery or finer, and pre-heating the acetone pre-washed metal, that the Hoppe's kit will do an acceptable re-blue of steel parts like barrel & air tube? Not expecting Colt or S&W Masterpiece quality, just a passable, decent blue. Any hope of success with Hoppe's?

Not much of a wood guy here, but thinking a honey gold finish or anwhere into a medium brown or reddish brown. What I have is Minwax 2718 Ebony & Minwax 2716 Dark Walnut, both are Stain/Sealer, or Ace Spar Varnish Gloss [claims rich amber finish]. Ebony is too dark, Walnut is a maybe but I'm thinking straight Spar Varnish, call it good. Whaddya think?

Thanks for any help or comment!
.
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Joined: February 11th, 2011, 2:00 am

July 2nd, 2012, 2:56 am #2

Is like yours, a light colored hardwood. Stained from the steel butt plate. The forearm is walnut, oddly enough. I put some dark stain on the butt and nothing at all on the forearm. Polished the bronze barrel and painted the tube and reciever with some Rustoleum dark metallic bronze. It looks good with the rusty patina of the steel parts, I think.
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Joined: May 22nd, 2007, 3:28 pm

July 2nd, 2012, 5:20 pm #3

Ooohhh, ooohhh, I LIKE IT! GREAT!

Very nice job, looks just great: MORE PICS! Got any more? I'd really like to see them.

I'm a bit worried about the wood. Haven't received the forestock yet. Rick at Precision Pellet happened to have one that matched the old one I sent him and he thought it's about the same year and a match for wood. Neither of us knows for sure about the wood underneath the finish, wait & see. My old forestock was close to the color of yours, butt stock had all finish [color] gone.

I really don't know what to do about the metal. Blueing would sure be nice but no idea how the Hoope's kit I have would perform on such large areas, a full blueing job. Paint would be fine too, but hoping on the blue.
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Joined: February 11th, 2011, 2:00 am

July 3rd, 2012, 2:27 am #4

And another "after". I've never tried bluing any parts before. I got a Birchwood-Casey kit awhile back and never got around to trying it. The steel parts on this 101 had a lot of surface rust, I just burnished them with a Dremel wire wheel. I like the way the gun looks this way. That paint looks black in the pics but is really a very dark brown. Including a pic of the old 101 and a couple of her stablemates, a 114 and 118. I really enjoy my 101, she's a great little shooter.





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Joined: July 22nd, 2011, 4:46 am

July 3rd, 2012, 2:45 am #5

The crinkle paint job on that 101 is pretty rare. It only came right at the end of production. It has sometimes been identified as being the Sears version of the 101. I would have advised against refinishing this gun. Much of the original value is now gone. For the most part, any 101 with a lot of paint left should not be refinished. Instead, clean it up. Use a lot of oil. Flitz works wonders. A good wax finish. Gun will look great and still be a collectable air gun.. A repainted gun just doesn't have the character left that most collectors are looking for.
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Joined: May 22nd, 2007, 3:28 pm

July 3rd, 2012, 4:25 am #6

Thanks, Terry!

That really increases the hope here! I truly wish mine had only been in the condition of your 'Before'. Instead about all mine lacked was having been drug down a gravel road from Omaha to Baton Rouge - RUFF!

Your stock's wood looks the same as mine. This one doesn't have quite as pronounced a grain as your 'Before' pic but it doesn't have any finish at all on it either. Whatever it is I'm hoping it will come out as nice as your stock with some nice [beautiful!] grain definition like that. Like yours, the forearm was slightly darker than buttstock even though it's the same wood.

That's a great pic of the 3 of them, really looking good. No doubt they're collectible but mine is nothing special and it's getting changed from useless, ugly, tortured and throw-away to an everyday shooter with a place of honor.

Thanks!
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Joined: February 11th, 2011, 2:00 am

July 3rd, 2012, 11:08 am #7

The crinkle paint job on that 101 is pretty rare. It only came right at the end of production. It has sometimes been identified as being the Sears version of the 101. I would have advised against refinishing this gun. Much of the original value is now gone. For the most part, any 101 with a lot of paint left should not be refinished. Instead, clean it up. Use a lot of oil. Flitz works wonders. A good wax finish. Gun will look great and still be a collectable air gun.. A repainted gun just doesn't have the character left that most collectors are looking for.
I didn't realize the crinkle finish was uncommon. This was the first 101 I laid eyes on, got it from a guy at a collectibles show for 60 bucks. I didn't even think it worked till I discovered it had to be cocked before pumping. Never been into it, could well be the original seals in there.
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Joined: July 17th, 2005, 5:16 pm

July 3rd, 2012, 4:13 pm #8

FWIW---extract from a post @ a year ago concerning a 101 stock to my daily airgunning Geezer bunch----------
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"---I was dreading the refinish work on the stock. It has several defects in the buttstock that will need to be steamed out and then something done about the stains in them. But that's minor compared to the real problem which is heavy black iron stains from the rusty buttplate that have discolored the bottom quarter inch and much further in some places where it has wicked up the grain. Tried bleach but it seemed ineffective and I really have a mental problem with putting any kind of corrosive chemicals into wood that will be in contact with metal. So I've just been marking time while I ransacked the hard drive between my ears. I finally recalled a tale a local buddy related a few years ago. He let the dogs out for their bedtime pee and there was a skunk on the deck. I'm sure we're all familiar with what happened next. He wound up with one dog that got a full dose and the deck and side of the house similarly blessed. Since he wasn't getting much sleep anyway he researched de-skunking a dog on the 'net. Best solution appeared to be bathing them in Hydrogen Peroxide. So next morning he sent the wife to buy up all the H2O2 that the local W-M had. Worked like a charm! But the deck (just recently re-stained) and house still stunk. So he filled his garden sprayer with Peroxide and went to work on them next. Upshot----bleached the fresh deck back to new looking wood.
So yesterday I poured some Hydrogen Peroxide in a contained and stood the 101 buttstock in it overnight. Took it out this morning and set it aside to dry. Just remembered it and went out to the shop to take a look. It's working! Will take another treatment right along the bottom but I'm now confident I can redeem that stock."
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In short the Peroxide worked a treat! HTH, Tom
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Joined: May 22nd, 2007, 3:28 pm

July 4th, 2012, 6:57 am #9

Great info! The Oxalic Acid works very well and fast but unfortunately it may be difficult to find and/or stupid expensive. Many sellers are bumping the price 300%-500% or much more for any small quantity. I finally found one company online that sold in bulk, just the powder in any quantity from tons to a 1.5 lbs plastic jar. Prices are very reasonable and nice folks, good customer service.

http://www.soapgoods.com/Oxalic-Acid-p-889.html

Oxalic Acid is also a tremendous rust remover!!! I have buckets of nuts & bolts and much old mechanical parts and these get soaked in a 5 gallon bucket water bath with Oxalic and come out rust free. Unfortunately it will leave a yellowish coating, heavier coating depending on strength of solution used. That's easily buffed or brushed off. Safe for any iron-steel metals, doesn't have a corrosive effect worth mentioning, relatively safe [no weird vapors] but of course rubber gloves & suitable eye protection suggested.

It will completely dissolve any rust on any iron based metal with no unpleasant side effects or damage.
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