What's your favorite movie?

What's your favorite movie?

Joined: September 29th, 2008, 8:28 pm

March 8th, 2009, 5:32 am #1

My wife and I watched 'A Dark Blue World' a couple weeks ago, and we both enjoyed it, for the most part. Heretofore, when it came to WW2 movies I had a pretty strict regime of what I watch - mainly POW movies that featured the British, but with a couple other combat epics thrown in. So the question here, for the sake of fun conversation, is: what is YOUR favorite RAF movie or recommendation?
At the risk of opening up a huge basket of snakes, I'll start off by stating - in public - that my personal all time favorite movie is 'The Great Escape'. I know, I know... they REALLY took a lot of liberties with the story, and I could really do without all the Steve McQueen prima donna hokum. And while the movie really deserves a high budget modern remake, it is a very entertaining film and the one that got me started on my escaping 'habit' so many years ago. PLEASE don't fire back with every little detail that is wrong with the film - I'm pretty sure we all can pick them out. (At least there is no love interest in it!) Because I saw the movie, I went out and got the book. Now I have over 100 RAF POW books and binders full of other RAF POW information in my office and about all the movies they made on the subject. My son (about to be four) names the movie as his 3rd favorite (right behind 'Cars' and 'Toy Story II'). So for good or bad, there you are.
What do YOU chaps recommend?

Rob Laplander
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Joined: January 5th, 2008, 2:29 pm

March 8th, 2009, 11:28 am #2

"Appointment In London" - Wing Commander Tim Mason (Dirk Bogarde) commands a Lancaster Squadron. Having flown over 80 missions he is ordered to cease flying on operations by his superiors. When a member of one crew is injured jut before take off Tim Mason takes his place, against orders, to fly his 90th mission. One of the lesser known WWII RAF films but in my opinion, one of the best. Dave S.
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Joined: May 4th, 2007, 8:13 am

March 8th, 2009, 11:58 am #3

I think this is going to be shown later in the year at the cinema in the woods in Woodhall Spa, if I lived a little closer I would go and see it. Just flagging it up for those in the area who might be interested.
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Joined: November 10th, 2003, 4:11 pm

March 8th, 2009, 2:36 pm #4

My wife and I watched 'A Dark Blue World' a couple weeks ago, and we both enjoyed it, for the most part. Heretofore, when it came to WW2 movies I had a pretty strict regime of what I watch - mainly POW movies that featured the British, but with a couple other combat epics thrown in. So the question here, for the sake of fun conversation, is: what is YOUR favorite RAF movie or recommendation?
At the risk of opening up a huge basket of snakes, I'll start off by stating - in public - that my personal all time favorite movie is 'The Great Escape'. I know, I know... they REALLY took a lot of liberties with the story, and I could really do without all the Steve McQueen prima donna hokum. And while the movie really deserves a high budget modern remake, it is a very entertaining film and the one that got me started on my escaping 'habit' so many years ago. PLEASE don't fire back with every little detail that is wrong with the film - I'm pretty sure we all can pick them out. (At least there is no love interest in it!) Because I saw the movie, I went out and got the book. Now I have over 100 RAF POW books and binders full of other RAF POW information in my office and about all the movies they made on the subject. My son (about to be four) names the movie as his 3rd favorite (right behind 'Cars' and 'Toy Story II'). So for good or bad, there you are.
What do YOU chaps recommend?

Rob Laplander
Leaving classics like 'The Dambusters', 'Ice Cold in Alex' etc., I 100% agree with JB that the best RAF based film is 'Appointment in London', the best scene to me is watching the glorious Dinah Sheridan (Eve Canyon)strutting on to stage at the RAF station after her first meeing with the crews at 'Dobbie's' pub.
I am sure 'Top Gun' pinched this for the follow up to the 'chat up' (You've Lost that Loving Feeling) scene when the female instructer first appears!!

Other suggestions:

The Way to the Stars (RAF)
Carve Her Name with Pride (SOE)
Went the Day well? (civilian) propoganda.

Two WW3 suggestions:(yes I mean WW3!!)

Fail Safe (famous because no music)
On the Beach (you will never forget Waltzing Matilda!)

This could go on forever.

Cheers

Tony
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Joined: November 10th, 2003, 4:11 pm

March 8th, 2009, 2:36 pm #5

My wife and I watched 'A Dark Blue World' a couple weeks ago, and we both enjoyed it, for the most part. Heretofore, when it came to WW2 movies I had a pretty strict regime of what I watch - mainly POW movies that featured the British, but with a couple other combat epics thrown in. So the question here, for the sake of fun conversation, is: what is YOUR favorite RAF movie or recommendation?
At the risk of opening up a huge basket of snakes, I'll start off by stating - in public - that my personal all time favorite movie is 'The Great Escape'. I know, I know... they REALLY took a lot of liberties with the story, and I could really do without all the Steve McQueen prima donna hokum. And while the movie really deserves a high budget modern remake, it is a very entertaining film and the one that got me started on my escaping 'habit' so many years ago. PLEASE don't fire back with every little detail that is wrong with the film - I'm pretty sure we all can pick them out. (At least there is no love interest in it!) Because I saw the movie, I went out and got the book. Now I have over 100 RAF POW books and binders full of other RAF POW information in my office and about all the movies they made on the subject. My son (about to be four) names the movie as his 3rd favorite (right behind 'Cars' and 'Toy Story II'). So for good or bad, there you are.
What do YOU chaps recommend?

Rob Laplander
Leaving classics like 'The Dambusters', 'Ice Cold in Alex' etc., I 100% agree with JB that the best RAF based film is 'Appointment in London', the best scene to me is watching the glorious Dinah Sheridan (Eve Canyon)strutting on to stage at the RAF station after her first meeing with the crews at 'Dobbie's' pub.
I am sure 'Top Gun' pinched this for the follow up to the 'chat up' (You've Lost that Loving Feeling) scene when the female instructer first appears!!

Other suggestions:

The Way to the Stars (RAF)
Carve Her Name with Pride (SOE)
Went the Day well? (civilian) propoganda.

Two WW3 suggestions:(yes I mean WW3!!)

Fail Safe (famous because no music)
On the Beach (you will never forget Waltzing Matilda!)

This could go on forever.

Cheers

Tony
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Joined: January 5th, 2008, 2:29 pm

March 8th, 2009, 3:34 pm #6

Hi Tony, It was me who suggested Appointment in London actually.......... I forgive you Dave S
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Joined: July 21st, 2008, 7:16 pm

March 8th, 2009, 4:48 pm #7


LOL, now now boys...

My favourite RAF films have to be Piece of Cake and the Battle of Britain. I know that there are quite a lot of mistakes in the latter film-but seeing those old warbirds in the air is just incredible. My Dad says that he remembers when he was living in London, seeing the German Heinkils coming over the Thames. He said that he rushed inside and said-'Daddy, Daddy-they're back!!!' LOL

I love Piece of Cake for the humour; and the take off scenes with the music is just incredible. I'm reading the book at the moment and I am loving it.

Other WW2 films that are in my top list are Band of Brothers and Saving Private Ryan. Schindler's List is just in another world...
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Joined: January 10th, 2009, 6:36 pm

March 8th, 2009, 5:04 pm #8

Hi Tony, It was me who suggested Appointment in London actually.......... I forgive you Dave S
I think I'm right in saying that the screenplay and score to `Appointment in London' was written by John De Lacy Wooldridge, or `Dim' as he was known in the RAF. The late W/Cdr Penny Beauchamp (who flew a tour on Manchesters with Dim on 207 Squadron in 1941-42) told me that he got the nickname from his habit of wearing his hat in the Mess (a major `black'). Whilst with 207 - which was struggling through problems with the unreliable Vultures on its Manchesters - Dim always insisted on carrying his greatcoat on operations, saying he was damned if he was going to be cold in a POW camp...

Dim worked for BP before the war, and was plucked from his 207 tour to become a flight commander on 106 Squadron under Guy Gibson. From his comments in `Enemy Coast Ahead', Gibson evidently had a low opinion, accusing him of not participating in the drinking and mess culture of the squadron on the (scarcely believeable) grounds that he wanted to stay in and write music...! Of course, on the basis of `Appointment in London', we know he was being serious. Gibson's low regard might also have stemmed from a tale he related about being told by Dim that his usual aircraft was not available for ops that night, as it was U/S. However, on completing the op in a spare, he formated on a familiar-looking aircraft the next morning, only to recognise it as `his' Lanc, with a nonchalant `Dim' at the controls...

For his third tour, Dim went on to become CO of 105 Squadron on Mosquitoes, which formed the basis for his book `Low Attack'. After the war he married the actress Margaretta Scott, and in addition to `Appointment in London', I believe he may also have written the score for `Angels One Five'. After all of the drama of his three tours in WW2, Penny Beauchamp related to me that Dim died in a car accident in the 1950s, the victim of a bald tyre...
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Joined: November 10th, 2003, 4:11 pm

March 8th, 2009, 5:12 pm #9

Hi Tony, It was me who suggested Appointment in London actually.......... I forgive you Dave S
Sorry, pressed the wrong button!!!!

Going off to 'Devonshire' to find my Country Cousins! and find redemption!!

Cheers
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Joined: September 7th, 2008, 5:53 am

March 8th, 2009, 6:52 pm #10

I think I'm right in saying that the screenplay and score to `Appointment in London' was written by John De Lacy Wooldridge, or `Dim' as he was known in the RAF. The late W/Cdr Penny Beauchamp (who flew a tour on Manchesters with Dim on 207 Squadron in 1941-42) told me that he got the nickname from his habit of wearing his hat in the Mess (a major `black'). Whilst with 207 - which was struggling through problems with the unreliable Vultures on its Manchesters - Dim always insisted on carrying his greatcoat on operations, saying he was damned if he was going to be cold in a POW camp...

Dim worked for BP before the war, and was plucked from his 207 tour to become a flight commander on 106 Squadron under Guy Gibson. From his comments in `Enemy Coast Ahead', Gibson evidently had a low opinion, accusing him of not participating in the drinking and mess culture of the squadron on the (scarcely believeable) grounds that he wanted to stay in and write music...! Of course, on the basis of `Appointment in London', we know he was being serious. Gibson's low regard might also have stemmed from a tale he related about being told by Dim that his usual aircraft was not available for ops that night, as it was U/S. However, on completing the op in a spare, he formated on a familiar-looking aircraft the next morning, only to recognise it as `his' Lanc, with a nonchalant `Dim' at the controls...

For his third tour, Dim went on to become CO of 105 Squadron on Mosquitoes, which formed the basis for his book `Low Attack'. After the war he married the actress Margaretta Scott, and in addition to `Appointment in London', I believe he may also have written the score for `Angels One Five'. After all of the drama of his three tours in WW2, Penny Beauchamp related to me that Dim died in a car accident in the 1950s, the victim of a bald tyre...
Please, please do not, I repeat, do not mention the Vulture's unreliability as you may offend lurkers. Let us keep a positive mood here. No bashing.

It was a stepping stone to much better powerplants and needs to be given due credit.

I think that Tora Tora Tora was quite an effort with the conversion of all the trainers to replicas. The level of accuracy was high too and they made an effort to make that so. Also, Catch 22 was also very good especially as I drank beer with author Joseph Heller years back and he was quite a mind.

cheers
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