type 21 microphone

type 21 microphone

Joined: August 31st, 2006, 11:55 am

March 30th, 2007, 5:53 am #1

I want too know how to connect a loom onto a type 21 microphone.
Can somebody help??
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Joined: December 9th, 2003, 10:45 pm

March 30th, 2007, 1:41 pm #2

Depends which colour codes your loom has - but a typical set up goes like this:

all yellow insulated lead to M-
green speckled cloth covered lead to centre
remaining lead to M+


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Joined: August 31st, 2006, 11:55 am

April 2nd, 2007, 7:41 pm #3

Ok thanks,

But how do you get to the connectionpoints? I see a rubber ring, do I have too remove that, it has too be destroyed then becaus it is so brittle
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Joined: August 23rd, 2003, 10:11 pm

April 2nd, 2007, 9:32 pm #4

Or in english, 'keep it in place!'
I wouldn't destroy the rubber ring. You're probably not going to use the microphone anyway, so there's not much point in actually connecting it.
Type 21's with the rubber ring still in place are, from what I gather, pretty rare.

You can insert the wiring loom into the microphone and tie the loom to the little thing that's there just for that purpose.

But that's just what I would do

Cheers, Toine
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Joined: February 28th, 2004, 3:00 pm

April 2nd, 2007, 11:40 pm #5

The previous correspondant was correct in the method of fixing, but was referring to the Type 19 Mic which has a chamois covering and three small screw fittings which are pretty easy to get to. The Type 21 is black metal, and the fixings are on the inside.

To affix a loom, the wiring has to be passed through a hole at the base of the mic and then wired into position. As Toine mentioned, if the rubber ring is in place this has to be lifted to get to the attachment points, but I would leave it in place as once its gone its gone.

You have three options. The first would be to just try and push the loom into place without actually trying to fix it to the terminals, thereby not destroying the rubber ring.

Or you could try removing the rubber ring, fixing the loom properly and then afterwards try to find a replacement ring, something like part of a cycle inner tube. This is risky, and would overall detract from the mic, the price if not the look.

A third option would be to contact Steve Silburn at Sefton Clothing. He makes incredible D Mask repro's and uses original fittings. He carried out some minor restoration on a mates D Mask and added some parts, so you could ask him if he can either fix it together for you, or advise you on the best way to go. He might even have a replacement ring.

In any case, don't be hasty!
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Joined: December 9th, 2003, 10:45 pm

April 3rd, 2007, 8:54 am #6

I was actually talking about the Type 21 in my original response. But as Toine pointed out, I assumed the ring was absent. Anyway, here's some pics.




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Joined: August 31st, 2006, 11:55 am

April 4th, 2007, 3:56 pm #7

The previous correspondant was correct in the method of fixing, but was referring to the Type 19 Mic which has a chamois covering and three small screw fittings which are pretty easy to get to. The Type 21 is black metal, and the fixings are on the inside.

To affix a loom, the wiring has to be passed through a hole at the base of the mic and then wired into position. As Toine mentioned, if the rubber ring is in place this has to be lifted to get to the attachment points, but I would leave it in place as once its gone its gone.

You have three options. The first would be to just try and push the loom into place without actually trying to fix it to the terminals, thereby not destroying the rubber ring.

Or you could try removing the rubber ring, fixing the loom properly and then afterwards try to find a replacement ring, something like part of a cycle inner tube. This is risky, and would overall detract from the mic, the price if not the look.

A third option would be to contact Steve Silburn at Sefton Clothing. He makes incredible D Mask repro's and uses original fittings. He carried out some minor restoration on a mates D Mask and added some parts, so you could ask him if he can either fix it together for you, or advise you on the best way to go. He might even have a replacement ring.

In any case, don't be hasty!
Thanks a lot guys!

It's quit clear now, at my mic there's still a piece of loom attached which have been cut off. So probably if I want too put a loom on that mic will have too remove the rubber ring.
I will think about it, because there's no hurry too it. Or maybe let a professional do it is the best option I guess~.

Thanks a lot,

Floris
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Joined: August 31st, 2006, 11:55 am

April 4th, 2007, 3:58 pm #8

Or in english, 'keep it in place!'
I wouldn't destroy the rubber ring. You're probably not going to use the microphone anyway, so there's not much point in actually connecting it.
Type 21's with the rubber ring still in place are, from what I gather, pretty rare.

You can insert the wiring loom into the microphone and tie the loom to the little thing that's there just for that purpose.

But that's just what I would do

Cheers, Toine
Hello Toine,

What kind of "rope" to ty off the loom you should use?? (the dutch word for it would do!!)

Thanks a lot,

Floris
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Joined: February 28th, 2004, 3:00 pm

April 4th, 2007, 6:45 pm #9

Firstly an apology to Gerry. With his description I assumed he was talking about the attachment points of the Type 19, but the photos of his without the rubber ring makes things clear.

As to the 'rope', I recently made up an oxygen hose extension of the type used to connect later masks such as the E, G and H, to the earlier oxygen system. This consists of a female bayonet fitting one end (into which the later mask hose is fitted), and a Mk III oxygen plug the other (as found on D masks) with a 30 inch length of rubber hose in the middle.

I used thinish garden twine to bind each end of the hose to the brass fittings and it looks exactly the same as the original. I used tea to 'dye' the twine from white to brown, and then used a small amount of glue to stick it. After 10 minutes to dry I used a bit more glue, winding the twine around several times, ending by pulling one end under the last loop and pulling tight. You can apply the same principle to the loom fitting.
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Joined: August 23rd, 2003, 10:11 pm

April 5th, 2007, 7:21 am #10

Hello Toine,

What kind of "rope" to ty off the loom you should use?? (the dutch word for it would do!!)

Thanks a lot,

Floris
In the aeroplane industry they use a kind of waxed cord ('vetkoord' in Dutch). When tightened this cord tends to 'grip' the other threads, thus fastening quite well.

The knot used is a bit more difficult the explain...
First you double up the cord along the long axis of the wiring loom, leaving about 4 inches (10cm) of cord dangling. The resulting loop points toward the microphone.
Next you wind the cord around the wiring loom from the end of the attachment thingie towards the loop (and towards the mic itself). When done, you cut the winding cord and tuck it through the loop.
Pulling the dangling piece of rope, you'll pull the loop and the end of the cord under the winded bit, securing it all in place.
Cut all the loose ends and Bob's your uncle!

Sometimes they use this trick in two separate parts, about 1/4 of an inch apart, for instance when securing the thin oxygen hose to the inlet ring of the D-type oxygen mask.

I'm not sure were you can buy this waxed cord, but I figure waxing a bit of beige garden cord will do the trick nicely!

Cheers, Toine
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