Minimum rank of a bomb aimer

Minimum rank of a bomb aimer

Joined: November 23rd, 2003, 6:13 pm

November 12th, 2005, 4:31 am #1

What would have been the minimum rank of a bomb aimer during the war?

Also, can someone give me some feedback on the originality of this brevet?



Cheers,

Steve
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Joined: February 28th, 2004, 3:00 pm

November 12th, 2005, 11:28 am #2

Steve

The B Wing, for Bomb Aimer (or more correctly 'Air Bomber') was introduced on September 17th 1942. It is not worn now, although I don't kow when it was discontinued. The photo you posted looks fine to me, a standard pattern RAF B Wing.

As for ranks, in the early part of the war, almost any of the lower ranks were aircrew, so you could easily find gunners, for example, as Leading Aircraftmen, or Corporals.

Quite quickly an order went out that the lowest aircrew rank was to be Sergeant, and although I am not certain when this was, I am positive it was in force by the time the B Wing was issued.

As an additional note, the E and N wings were introduced at the same time as the B.
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Joined: November 24th, 2004, 5:08 pm

November 12th, 2005, 3:38 pm #3

What would have been the minimum rank of a bomb aimer during the war?

Also, can someone give me some feedback on the originality of this brevet?



Cheers,

Steve
Hi,
Just to add to Alex's message, your wing or brevet is a variant of the standard RAF issue and is of Canadian manufacture. A characteristic of the Canadian-made wings is the tip of the wing, it is flat whereas the British-made examples are more rounded and have coarse weave.Air Bomber wings were first issued in 1942.
For more information see Warren Carroll's excellent book Eagles Recalled or this site: http://www.ww2wings.com/main.shtml.
Regards,
Derekhttp://www.network54.com/Realm/tmp/1131809867.JPG
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Joined: November 23rd, 2003, 6:13 pm

November 12th, 2005, 5:10 pm #4

Thanks guys, I had seen that website before but couldn't find it yesterday, so thank you very much for that as well.

The tunic in question is badged for Newfoundland and so I assume that it has an RAF style badge because Newfoundland wasn't a part of Canada at the time and wouldn't have worn RCAF badges. Am I correct in my thinking?
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Joined: November 24th, 2004, 5:08 pm

November 12th, 2005, 9:02 pm #5

Hi Steve,

That is a good question, far being being an expert I can only say that the RAF Newfoundland title was issued under AMO A563 in July 1941. Anyway it is an interesting combination. I guess that this must be the correct wing as opposed to the Canadian "RAF" pattern used from December 1942, a so called small curved wing without the crown or RCAF. Are the tunic buttons marked?
Regards,
Derek

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 12th, 2005, 9:17 pm #6

What would have been the minimum rank of a bomb aimer during the war?

Also, can someone give me some feedback on the originality of this brevet?



Cheers,

Steve
Steve,
The wing shown in the image is a Canadian-produced RAF wing. As already mentioned, the angled part of the upper wing feather is common to these wings. Typical recipients would be RAF graduates of BCATP schools, as well as RAF personnel serving in Canada.

As noted, Newfoundland was not a part of Canada during WW2. RCAF members serving there were allowed wear CANADA titles, as they were considered serving outside the national borders.

The introduction of minimum rank of Sergeant for aircrew tradesman (those other than pilots or observers) was instituted in May of 1940.

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Joined: November 23rd, 2003, 6:13 pm

November 12th, 2005, 9:37 pm #7

Hi Steve,

That is a good question, far being being an expert I can only say that the RAF Newfoundland title was issued under AMO A563 in July 1941. Anyway it is an interesting combination. I guess that this must be the correct wing as opposed to the Canadian "RAF" pattern used from December 1942, a so called small curved wing without the crown or RCAF. Are the tunic buttons marked?
Regards,
Derek
The tunic must also be of British manufacture as it is not lined like my Canadian tunics are. Unfortunately, the maker's label is faded and unreadable. This is the first Newfoundland tunic that I have encountered and it has been a great learning experience.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 13th, 2005, 12:11 am #8

Steve,
The easiest way to tell the origin of the tunic is to simply look at the pocket flaps. While RCAF officer tunics are the same as the RAF, the Other Ranks tunics for RCAF are vastly different than the RAF. Most obvious are the upper pocket flaps -- RCAF being single-pointed (like an Army BD blouse) while RAF had triple-pointed flaps.

While there are a myriad of other difference, the biggest ones are the flaps, the linings, and the fabric itself.
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Joined: November 23rd, 2003, 6:13 pm

November 13th, 2005, 4:55 am #9

Interesting to see how superior the quality of the Canadian uniforms were compared to British uniforms during the war.
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Joined: December 12th, 2005, 7:32 pm

February 13th, 2006, 7:12 pm #10

Steve,
The wing shown in the image is a Canadian-produced RAF wing. As already mentioned, the angled part of the upper wing feather is common to these wings. Typical recipients would be RAF graduates of BCATP schools, as well as RAF personnel serving in Canada.

As noted, Newfoundland was not a part of Canada during WW2. RCAF members serving there were allowed wear CANADA titles, as they were considered serving outside the national borders.

The introduction of minimum rank of Sergeant for aircrew tradesman (those other than pilots or observers) was instituted in May of 1940.
Just to piggyback on what everyone here has said, here's a couple of photos of my grandfather, who went through air bomber training and then became an instructor in the BCATP (hence my username). The first one is him (on the right) and his best mate from training. The second one is a portrait taken after getting his commission.

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a230/ ... andpa4.jpg
http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a230/ ... andpa1.jpg
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