B-Type helmet cushions

B-Type helmet cushions

Joined: June 15th, 2012, 7:23 pm

August 4th, 2012, 12:20 pm #1

Does anyone know if there was an official way of fitting the foam cushions into a b-type helmet? In most period photos they appear to be fitted with the curved side facing out but I have also seen photos where the receiver is protruding outwards suggesting them to be fitted the opposite way. Is this just a personal preference perhaps?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 8th, 2004, 10:02 pm

August 4th, 2012, 4:00 pm #2

Andy, when the edge of the receiver is seen rather than the domed appearance, the cushions simply weren't fitted.
If a B-type didn't have any cushions for an extended period, the leather tended to shrink around the receiver.
It wasn't really possible or of any use to put the cushions in back to front without potentially damaging the ear cover.
Cheers Neil
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 15th, 2012, 7:23 pm

August 5th, 2012, 9:43 am #3

Thanks Mark. Yesterday with less and less of these original flyers around it is getting harder to get true information. On a slightly different note I was looking at a signed photo I have of Bob Tuck in his personal Hurricane. He is wearing Mk III goggles on top of a C-Type helmet that is almost certainly fitted with gosport tubes. Odd dont you think?. Perhaps it was a staged photo.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 8th, 2004, 10:02 pm

August 6th, 2012, 6:48 pm #4

Andy, during 1940, Bob Tuck wore either a station taylor modified B-type helmet or it was a private purchase helmet.
I reckon it was a station modded helmet. It looks like his helmet had the receiver retainers just sewn directly to a normal B-helmet, minus the zip housings. Possibly he didn't use ear doughnuts either.
Tuck also didn't use the standard fitting for his D-type oxygen mask. He used what looks like a MKIII goggle strap sewn to the mask.
Cheers
Neil
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 15th, 2012, 7:23 pm

August 8th, 2012, 5:39 pm #5

You certainly know your stuff mate. I have looked at the pic again and you are probably right the photo is too distant to tell for sure. Still looks like a C-type though the way the receivers have been attached. Strange chap Tuck!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 21st, 2008, 7:16 pm

August 10th, 2012, 11:56 am #6

If you look at the panel configuration it's definitely a b-type, or something of a similar nature.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 4th, 2007, 8:13 am

August 10th, 2012, 12:11 pm #7

I always thought it was probably a 1930 pattern helmet, same panel configuration as a b type, but without the vent up the back so a bit more comfortable to wear.

With the 1930 pattern (well the one I have anyway) the receivor rings are sewn directly to the helmet and then the circular flaps are attached separately. I have always taken Tuck's helmet to be a 1930 pattern without the flaps attached.

Jb
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 21st, 2008, 7:16 pm

August 11th, 2012, 7:23 pm #8

I think you may be right JB. It certainly appears to fit him better than a standard b-type.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 8th, 2004, 10:02 pm

August 11th, 2012, 11:16 pm #9

Jb, I never thought that Tuck's helmet could be a 1930 patt! Good idea! I have a '30 patt and they were certainly comfortable.
There was sponge sewn in between the chammy liner and the exterior leather, without use of dough nuts, making it very comfortable.

Another odd helmet was Johnny Kent's! He used MKIV goggles and used some strange moulded hook device on top to hold the goggles. The same piece seemed to wrap around to hold the receivers.
Take a look at some photos.
I will try to post some here.
Cheers
Neil
PS, hi Ben!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 21st, 2008, 7:16 pm

August 13th, 2012, 7:05 pm #10

Hi Neil, I hope life is treating you well!

Whilst on the subject of photos showing interesting items of kit, I stumbled across this video on youtube. Interesting GQ parasuit with the top half doped yellow.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIIqY81T ... r_embedded#!
Quote
Like
Share