HP Chart

Joined: June 24th, 2003, 2:14 am

September 18th, 2009, 10:01 pm #1


<strong>Foreword</strong>


(Revised 8/7/10)

Before diving into the horsepower charts, a few items need to be clarified first. This is for 460 Ford motors with 4.36-4.44-inch bores and 3.85-inch stroke. These charts are for new members, either just getting into engines or coming from a different motor and wanting to know the particulars about building a 460, and for seasoned Ford 460 users wanting to know how to attain a certain horsepower from their combo. It is not a pump gas only list. It is designed to give the best overall performance for a given hp range.

Last edited by DJOHAGIN on August 8th, 2010, 12:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 24th, 2003, 2:14 am

September 18th, 2009, 10:10 pm #2

<strong>The intake system</strong>

It can not be stressed enough how important the carburetor is to the build. It will determine how the vehicle runs more so than any other component on the engine.

A out of the box stock Holley Double Pumper is set from the factory with the idle and cruising circuits very rich, and it takes a professional carburetor tuner to get them set-up properly for the street. Poor gas mileage and sluggish throttle response will occur using it straight out of the box. Holleys line of HP or HP Ultra carbs and Quick Fuel Technologies carbs are good carburetors to invest in.

Not only for street use, but racing use also needs the carburetor to be set-up properly.

<strong>Cylinder heads</strong>

This is the area where you will have, or have not, the horsepower youre seeking.

There are only 4 different cylinder heads shown for all these builds. There are other cylinder heads that can be used for each horsepower level, and in some cases preferred, once a person learns/knows what the other heads specifications are.

At every horsepower level, the cylinder head should be purchased from a professional cylinder head shop/porter. There is power to be found in doing a correct valve job even at the lowest of hp levels.

Furthermore, the TFS heads and P51 are mass produced items. A professional can get them "dialed-in". Do not think because you paid X amount of dollars that the head is perfect. Sometimes, not always, they need a little touching up for them to flow like they should out of the box, a lap job for the valve seal, etc.

<strong>Shortblock
</strong>
A word on basic machining. The basic part recommendations in each horsepower level increases as rpm rises. It is rpm, and not horsepower that requires the better parts. The time spent at the higher rpms also affects part selection. When in doubt, it never hurts to upgrade parts. The parts suggested at each build level will be able handle the rpm with good machining.

Good machining starts with making sure all parts are sound. All steel parts should be magnaflux crack tested, and all aluminum parts with zyglo. Every part should be checked, even new parts, to make sure they have correct measurements. If you find measurements to be off, have them corrected. Even though machining in it itself does not add a significant amount of power between the best job and a poor job, the life of the engine can be affected greatly. The higher the rpm, the more critical and costly the machining becomes, due to the machinist having to mock up multiple times, setting up his equipment to get the machining spot on, and checking and rechecking engine measurements. Be aware also that aftermarket race components often require fitting to make them work. They typically do not just bolt-on.

On 400 to 550 hp builds, it is prudent to find a good machinist/engine builder. Past the 550 hp mark, it is best not only to find a good machinist/engine builder, but one who is familiar with building 460s. There are minor things that can make or break the combo beyond 550 hp.

The stock crank, 2-bolt mains, and factory bolts are good to the 675-700 horsepower build which after the block should be 4-bolted. It is rpm again, for the need to 4-bolt. Anytime rpm exceeds 7500 rpm, aluminum rods should be considered, as cap walk starts to show up after that rpm with steel rods.

High Flow Dynamic's website on oiling mods:

http://www.highflowdyhamics.com/

<strong>Exhaust system</strong>

It is important to use a free flowing muffler in all the builds. Flow-Masters do not flow enough. Any muffler were you can pick it up and look thru it, without barbs or such protruding into the airflow will be a good flowing one. If noise is a concern, then a termination box should be built and then mufflers. You are striving for no back pressure.
Last edited by DJOHAGIN on September 19th, 2009, 12:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 24th, 2003, 2:14 am

September 18th, 2009, 10:13 pm #3

<strong>Foreword</strong>


(Revised 8/7/10)

Before diving into the horsepower charts, a few items need to be clarified first. This is for 460 Ford motors with 4.36-4.44-inch bores and 3.85-inch stroke. These charts are for new members, either just getting into engines or coming from a different motor and wanting to know the particulars about building a 460, and for seasoned Ford 460 users wanting to know how to attain a certain horsepower from their combo. It is not a pump gas only list. It is designed to give the best overall performance for a given hp range.
There is more power than just raising the compression by using quench. Here is a quote from Scott Johnson and Paul Kane on the subject of the importance of quench and engine performance. In all the engine builds, this is factored in. Take a note of the torque loss by not using quench to your advantage.

<em>Quench is the distance between the flat portion of the cylinder head deck and the top of the piston. The early BBF's set the piston about .010" below deck at TDC. Combined with a head gasket of about .040" thick this made for a quench distance of about .050". The later 460's set the piston even further below deck at TDC to further reduce static C/R with a resulting quench distance of some.065" which is really marginal.

The reason quench is important? As the piston approaches TDC the air fuel mixture in that area is violently forced into the chamber proper and serves to re-homogenize the mixture in the chamber and cool the chamber resulting in greater detonation tolerance for a given static compression ratio. The name is derived from the fact that the small crevice area there serves to quench the flame front.

A quench distance greater than .060" loses much of the effectiveness of the design. I set most of my combos at Deck height for higher RPM use and about set the piston about .005" out of the hole for lower RPM use. Tight quench makes more torque for a given static C/R plain and simple. 7 to 10 pound feet for every .010" you close the quench distance is nothing to sneeze at.

Remember that at speed the piston and connecting rod stretch and the actual running distance is even closer. The higher the rpm window of operation the greater the amount of stretch. The trick is to have the piston almost kissing the head at max RPM so that the violent shock wave imparts a lot of additional mixture motion in the chamber when the flame front is in its early stages. Tight quench combos have faster mean flame front rates than non quench combos and need less ignition timing to make best power.

This is the reason I avoid using Sealed-Power pistons, or any piston for that matter, that has a short compression height which leaves the piston sometimes as much as .035" down the hole at TDC in the later blocks.

Just want to add that the quench area of the combustion chamber must be tight clearanced enough (as outlined above) so that the negligible air/fuel mixture does not ignite in this area.

When the quench distance is inadequate/too far open, the air/fuel mixture ignites in this area....hence, NO QUENCH.
</em>
A note on detonation. If you build a motor to the ragged edge of pump gas, and it detonates, you lose horsepower and you will harm the motor. It is better to sacrifice a little power (4% per point) and use less compression. If you are determined to use high compression, use race gas. It is cheaper in the long run than to harm your engine with detonation. Octane requirements have been noted in the builds.
Last edited by DJOHAGIN on September 19th, 2009, 12:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 24th, 2003, 2:14 am

September 18th, 2009, 10:18 pm #4

<strong>Foreword</strong>


(Revised 8/7/10)

Before diving into the horsepower charts, a few items need to be clarified first. This is for 460 Ford motors with 4.36-4.44-inch bores and 3.85-inch stroke. These charts are for new members, either just getting into engines or coming from a different motor and wanting to know the particulars about building a 460, and for seasoned Ford 460 users wanting to know how to attain a certain horsepower from their combo. It is not a pump gas only list. It is designed to give the best overall performance for a given hp range.
Some have asked about a horsepower chart for stroker kits. Some of the most common are:

4.39 bore x 4.15 stroke = 502 cubic inches

4.39 bore x 4.3 stroke = 520 cubic inches

4.39 bore x 4.5 stroke = 545 cubic inches

By adding a stroker crankshaft, the following occurs:

1) For every 50 cubic inches added, the rpm at which torque and horsepower peak at will drop about 600 rpm. So, if your 460 horsepower peaks at 6000 rpm, a 545 will peak at 5000 rpm. This assumes not changing anything else in the engine combo.

2) If you wish to maintain the same horsepower and torque peaks when you increase the stroke, you need to add between 12 to 16 degrees of additional intake duration for every 50 cubic inches added in displacement. Respectively, exhaust will have to be increased also.

3) The amount of torque below the torque peak, and at peak, will increase. This is a good thing, especially for street cars.

4) The larger the engine, the faster it will pull rpm. The weight of the rotating assembly is almost the same on all strokes, from a 460 to the 545 assembly, but as you increase the stroke, the engine now has more displacement pushing that assembly.

5) If you keep the same cylinder heads on the larger motor, you need to add overlap by using a tighter lobe separation, usually 1 to 2 degrees for every additional 50 cubic inches, until you get to 270 degrees @ .050" lift. Above 270 @ .050" duration, you need to bring lobe separation wider to limit overlap that is inherent after that duration. BSFC numbers go up needlessly with too much overlap.

The tighter lobe separation angle adds the necessary overlap to feed the additional inches, however, it does close the intake valve earlier. The horsepower peak numbers will be similar, but will occur at a slightly lower rpm with the tighter LSA. It is usually good not to advance the cam as much as usual.

If your compression ratio is "on the edge" running on pump gas, it may be inapproopriate to tighten the LSA because it increases lower rpm cylinder pressures. The tight LSA adds low and mid range torque because of the lower end cylinder pressures, but may not be needed if the vehicle combo is traction limited. As an example, a street vechicle only running on street tires.

6) Peak horsepower will increase slightly.
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Joined: June 24th, 2003, 2:14 am

September 18th, 2009, 10:20 pm #5

<strong>Foreword</strong>


(Revised 8/7/10)

Before diving into the horsepower charts, a few items need to be clarified first. This is for 460 Ford motors with 4.36-4.44-inch bores and 3.85-inch stroke. These charts are for new members, either just getting into engines or coming from a different motor and wanting to know the particulars about building a 460, and for seasoned Ford 460 users wanting to know how to attain a certain horsepower from their combo. It is not a pump gas only list. It is designed to give the best overall performance for a given hp range.
In regards to this chart, for every listed horsepower level, there is at least 10 different combos to get that same power. The builds outlined will get you the horsepower listed, but they are not the only way. Every individual's combo requires its own unique build.

In conclusion, this chart cannot be everything to everyone. Think of this chart as just as a guide-line to get you started in the right direction.

Now for the builds:
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Joined: June 24th, 2003, 2:14 am

September 18th, 2009, 10:23 pm #6

<strong>Foreword</strong>


(Revised 8/7/10)

Before diving into the horsepower charts, a few items need to be clarified first. This is for 460 Ford motors with 4.36-4.44-inch bores and 3.85-inch stroke. These charts are for new members, either just getting into engines or coming from a different motor and wanting to know the particulars about building a 460, and for seasoned Ford 460 users wanting to know how to attain a certain horsepower from their combo. It is not a pump gas only list. It is designed to give the best overall performance for a given hp range.
<span><span><strong>Intake System:</strong></span><span>

Holley 600-750 vacuum secondary
Edelbrock Performer (non-RPM) Intake Manifold

Cylinder Heads:

D3VE Heads
(No Port work. Just good 3 angle valve job.)
Intake valve size 2.08
Exhaust valve size 1.65
Stock rockers.

Short Block:

Comp Cam Custom Spec Hydraulic flat tappet cam or equivalent
Based on the Xtreme Energy Hydraulic Series
Intake Lobe 5437 and Exhaust Lobe 5430
(Specs:240/250 adv., 196/206@.050, .476/.479 lift, 112 LSA)
Compression around 8.0:1
Stock crank
Stock rods
Standard volume oil pump
Stock oil pan

Exhaust:

Passenger cast-iron manifolds to dual 2.25" pipes with H-pipe. Good flowing 2.5" Magnaflow mufflers or equivalent.

Summary:

87-octane. Horsepower peak at 4,100 rpm. Keep redline to 5000 rpm.

</span>

</span>
Last edited by DJOHAGIN on January 22nd, 2010, 5:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 24th, 2003, 2:14 am

September 18th, 2009, 10:27 pm #7

<strong>Foreword</strong>


(Revised 8/7/10)

Before diving into the horsepower charts, a few items need to be clarified first. This is for 460 Ford motors with 4.36-4.44-inch bores and 3.85-inch stroke. These charts are for new members, either just getting into engines or coming from a different motor and wanting to know the particulars about building a 460, and for seasoned Ford 460 users wanting to know how to attain a certain horsepower from their combo. It is not a pump gas only list. It is designed to give the best overall performance for a given hp range.
<span><strong>Intake System:</strong></span><span>

Holley 750 vacuum secondary
Edelbrock Performer (non-Rpm) Intake Manifold

Cylinder Heads:

RHP Stage I Replacement D3 Heads
(270-ish/180-ish cfm @.600)
Intake valve size 2.08
Exhaust valve size 1.65
Stock rockers.

Short Block:

Comp Cam Custom Spec Hydraulic flat tappet cam or equivalent
Based on the Xtreme Energy Hydraulic Series
Intake Lobe 5430 and Exhaust Lobe 5232
(Specs:250/268 adv., 206/218@.050, .479/.493. lift, 112 LSA)
Compression around 9.0:1
Stock crank
Stock rods
Standard volume oil pump
Stock oil pan

Exhaust:

Passenger cast-iron manifolds to dual 2.25" pipes with H-pipe. Good flowing 2.5" Magnaflow mufflers or equivalent.

Summary:

91 octane. Horsepower peak at 4,500 rpm. Keep redline to 5500 rpm.

</span>
Last edited by DJOHAGIN on August 7th, 2010, 3:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 24th, 2003, 2:14 am

September 18th, 2009, 10:30 pm #8

<strong>Foreword</strong>


(Revised 8/7/10)

Before diving into the horsepower charts, a few items need to be clarified first. This is for 460 Ford motors with 4.36-4.44-inch bores and 3.85-inch stroke. These charts are for new members, either just getting into engines or coming from a different motor and wanting to know the particulars about building a 460, and for seasoned Ford 460 users wanting to know how to attain a certain horsepower from their combo. It is not a pump gas only list. It is designed to give the best overall performance for a given hp range.
<span><strong>Intake System:</strong></span><span>

Holley 750 vacuum secondary
Edelbrock Performer (non-Rpm) Intake Manifold

Cylinder Heads:

RHP Stage I Replacement D3 Heads
(270-ish/180-ish cfm @.600)
Intake valve size 2.08
Exhaust valve size 1.65
Stock rockers.

Short Block:

Comp Cam Custom Spec Hydraulic flat tappet cam or equivalent
Based on the Xtreme Energy Hydraulic Series
Intake Lobe 5430 and Exhaust Lobe 5232
(Specs:250/268 adv., 206/218@.050, .479/.493. lift, 110 LSA)
Compression around 9.0:1
Stock crank
Stock rods
Standard volume oil pump
Stock oil pan

Exhaust:

1.75" headers to dual 2.5" pipes with H-pipe. Good flowing 2.5" Magnaflow mufflers or equivalent.

Summary:

91 octane. Horsepower peak at 4,500 rpm. Keep redline to 5500 rpm.

</span>
Last edited by DJOHAGIN on August 7th, 2010, 11:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 24th, 2003, 2:14 am

September 19th, 2009, 1:01 am #9

<strong>Foreword</strong>


(Revised 8/7/10)

Before diving into the horsepower charts, a few items need to be clarified first. This is for 460 Ford motors with 4.36-4.44-inch bores and 3.85-inch stroke. These charts are for new members, either just getting into engines or coming from a different motor and wanting to know the particulars about building a 460, and for seasoned Ford 460 users wanting to know how to attain a certain horsepower from their combo. It is not a pump gas only list. It is designed to give the best overall performance for a given hp range.
<span>Intake System:

Holley 750 vacuum secondary
Edelbrock Performer Rpm Intake Manifold

Cylinder Heads:

RHP Stage II Replacement D3 Heads
(310-ish/200-ish cfm @.600)
Intake valve size 2.08
Exhaust valve size 1.65
Stock rockers.

Short Block:

Comp Cam Custom Spec Hydraulic flat tappet cam or equivalent
Based on the Xtreme Energy Hydraulic Series
Intake Lobe 5430 and Exhaust Lobe 5232
(Specs:250/268 adv., 206/218@.050, .479/.493. lift, 110 LSA)
Compression around 9.0:1
Stock crank
Stock rods
Standard volume oil pump
Stock oil pan

Exhaust:

1.75" headers to dual 2.5" pipes with H-pipe. Good flowing 2.5" Magnaflow mufflers or equivalent.

Summary:

91 octane. Keep redline to 5500 rpm.

</span>
Last edited by DJOHAGIN on August 7th, 2010, 3:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 24th, 2003, 2:14 am

September 19th, 2009, 1:03 am #10

<strong>Foreword</strong>


(Revised 8/7/10)

Before diving into the horsepower charts, a few items need to be clarified first. This is for 460 Ford motors with 4.36-4.44-inch bores and 3.85-inch stroke. These charts are for new members, either just getting into engines or coming from a different motor and wanting to know the particulars about building a 460, and for seasoned Ford 460 users wanting to know how to attain a certain horsepower from their combo. It is not a pump gas only list. It is designed to give the best overall performance for a given hp range.
<span>Intake System:

Holley 750 vacuum secondary
Edelbrock Performer Rpm Intake Manifold

Cylinder Heads:

RHP Stage II Replacement D3 Heads with port match
(310-ish/200-ish cfm @.600)
Intake valve size 2.08
Exhaust valve size 1.65
Stock rockers.

Short Block:

Comp Cam XE262H Hydraulic flat tappet cam or equivalent
(Specs:262/270 adv., 218/224@.050, .513/.520, 110 LSA)
Compression around 9:0:1
Stock crank
Stock rods with good bolts
Standard volume oil pump
Stock oil pan with windage tray

Exhaust:

1.75" headers to dual 2.5" pipes with H-pipe. Good flowing 2.5" Magnaflow mufflers or equivalent.

Summary:

91-octane. Keep redline to 6000 rpm.

</span>
Last edited by DJOHAGIN on August 7th, 2010, 11:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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