Gaiters

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Bryan
Forum Private
Bryan
Forum Private
Joined: 10 Nov 2010, 15:11

04 Jan 2012, 10:04 #11

When we first started up I obtained a pattern for gaitors / gaiters (I have no idea how it's spelt) from an existing group. They were of the two leg pieces and a toecap type. When I sewed the first pair up they looked like tubes to my eyes, especially the long black ones. When looking at pictures they always appear to be shaped to the leg even allowing for artistic licence. Anyway I was most unhappy with the pair made up from that pattern.

I then looked at all my books and of course the internet and at that time could not track down any good info on existing period ones. However I managed to find a dilapidated Victorian pair which I carefully dismantled and made a pattern from. They consist of three leg pieces with no toe part and have the advantage of actually looking leg shaped when made up. This is admittedly more important for the long black ones which are very visible on redcoats. They do make the short grey ones much better fitting as well though.

We make the long black ones of the heaviest black wool I can find with two vertical strips of unbleached linen re-enforcing the button and button hole sides. The short grey ones are mostly ex swiss army greatcoats that have found new employment.
Neither Kings nor Queens nor Royal Marines but 28th. Old Bragg's. Brass before and brass behind never feared a foe of any kind.
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Eddie
Forum Lieutenant
Eddie
Forum Lieutenant
Joined: 04 Sep 2010, 11:49

04 Jan 2012, 14:11 #12

Ben wrote:

"My intention was to make an analogy not a direct comparison, my point being that issued regimental equipment oughtn't to be altered ad hoc to suit the individual based on a C21st view of practicality. Flogging will be the result. Of course after Kieran has been flogged, we may find he has sparked or contributed to a useful debate.."

Sorry Ben I  didn't realise you was making one of them analogy thingees -
but you do talk like a gennelman ranker sometimes ! :q21:

Go ahead and flog Hazzard - seems an insolent fellow overdue for the triangle. Perhaps because he is a Rifleman he thinks he may do whatever he thinks proper!

Point is those how the Rifles can flog when their Sjts don't carry pikes to make a triangle? I feel a new post topic coming on....
"Far the calling bugles hollo,
High the screaming Fife replies,
Gay the files of scarlet follow:
Woman bore me, I will rise"
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Pvt._McNamara
Forum Recruit
Pvt._McNamara
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Joined: 11 Feb 2011, 15:12

04 Jan 2012, 14:51 #13

With rifles always on the run and little time for ceremonies like building an spontoon triangle I guess Mr. Craufurds saddle on his horse should be enough for you green guys.

Back to topic: Is there something known about the number of buttons on the short gaiters? Someone mentioned that Highlanders gaitors were even even shorter then those of the rest.
Gren. Coy. 42d RHR (german section)
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John Waller
Forum Chosenman
John Waller
Forum Chosenman
Joined: 10 Dec 2010, 10:54

12 May 2015, 11:45 #14

Quick question; short gaiters, fixed stirrup or does one end of the strap fit onto the bottom button? Looking at commercially available ones both types are available.
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Radford
Forum Rifleman
Radford
Forum Rifleman
Joined: 29 Oct 2010, 04:58

12 May 2015, 18:02 #15

Footnote number 4 in the article on Breeches and Trousers on the War of 1812 web site has this to say about linings (this was mentioned up thread but this is the full quote):

4] Standing Orders of the 33rd Regiment [1813] make no reference to lining material for the tall gaiters but do make reference to lining material for the short gaiters. p.29

http://www.warof1812.ca/trousers.htm

I interpreted the footnote to mean that the short gaiters were fully lined. I lined mine like so:

As you can see, I advocate for the instep strap to be fastened on both ends, just at the tongue seam. The button plaquet on gaiters runs down the side of the leg, ending up over the side of the heel. When I initially started making AWI period gaiters, I tried buttoning the instep strap to the bottom button on the plaquet. This didn't work well - the instep strap needs to pull to the rear over the heel to reach. This twists the gaiter around on the foot.

There is a good image of a pair of original long gaiters on page 43 of "A Soldier Like Way", which show that instep strap fastened at both ends at the tongue seam. Even though this is a Seven Years' War item, it shows everything we continue to expect from a British military gaiter; a tongue, a button plaquet, no front seam, and a rear seam.

The gaiter shown at the link below is also 7YW vintage. You will see that the instep strap has one free end, but it does not button to the bottom button on the plaquet, rather there are two buttons at the tongue seam.

https://janeausteninvermont.files.wordp ... museum.jpg

BTW, does anyone happen to have a full copy of the 33rd Foot Standing Orders ca. 1813?
Cheers!

Radford Polinsky
(Sjt. John Savage, Col's Coy. HM 33rd Foot -AWI)
www.33rdfoot.org

(Rct. Joseph Radford 559, 33rd Foot 1815)
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John Waller
Forum Chosenman
John Waller
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Joined: 10 Dec 2010, 10:54

13 May 2015, 09:45 #16

Thanks Radford. I have reached the same conclusion as you and will stitch at both ends. I would have finished them last night but a needle in the thumb and the ensuing blood flow put an end to the evening's work.
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Ben Townsend
Forum General
Ben Townsend
Forum General
Joined: 19 Nov 2007, 21:35

13 May 2015, 09:51 #17

I believe the 33rd Standing orders were reproduced in the Iron Duke regimental magazine. I have a few copies but can't recall if I ever successfully got that one. The regimental museum at Bankfield should have a full run of copies. John (Doc) White who posts on here must have seen them.

Rifleman LaLa
I'm part of the problem
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TheDonnyLightHorseman
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Joined: 14 Aug 2017, 08:53

22 Aug 2017, 09:57 #18

Hello all, hope you don't mind the thread-omancy.

Thought I'd add some input to the gaiter discussion. I have adjusted a pair of the black 'full dress' British gaiters to fit - see the pics below (and please excuse the bare limbs on display).

The gaiters were bought fully lined, but on the advice of Sean Phillips and taking into account the various sources discussed in this thread, I took the lining out except for around the buttons/buttonholes. As a result it was much simpler to adjust the gaiter to the leg, using the rear seam. Taking out the lining also improves the fit overall, as it allows the wool to stretch and conform to the calf.

To fit this one, I tried to imagine the regimental tailors having to do a whole company's worth at once. So the object was to keep the process as simple as possible. All 16 of the buttons (I'm a tall one) were sewn about half an inch from the edge. The gaiter was then put on the leg and pinched down the rear seam to make it tight. A line was then chalked on, following the line of the leg. The seam was then ripped open and quickly basted together along the chalked lines to check the new fit, before finally being backstitched properly together.

Comments and feedback welcome!

Shame be to him who thinks evil of it.
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Paul Durrant
Site Admin
Joined: 04 Jun 2007, 20:42

22 Aug 2017, 14:21 #19

Oooo... nice and tight!

For what it's worth, here's something Russian, c1750
Copyright & Courtesy: Digital Museum (Sweden)

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TheDonnyLightHorseman
Forum Recruit
Joined: 14 Aug 2017, 08:53

22 Aug 2017, 15:00 #20

Naturally! ; )

Those Russian ones are very nice, almost the same as the French ones initially posted. Thanks for sharing!

The 'shoe area' being lined is a common theme in these extant examples. I had held off from doing this so far because the tongue on my gaiter is very short and stubby - I have a feeling this is also incorrect. Nearly all the gaiters we see in contemporary drawings (see below a range across the 1800-1820 era) and as extant examples have large tongues which will cover most of the shoe/boot. This is both more practical (protects from stones and twigs etc) and looks smarter in my opinion.

Of course, I might be wrong!

Shame be to him who thinks evil of it.
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