Undress / Fatigue dress / Waistcoats

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Obadiah
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Obadiah
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Joined: August 1st, 2006, 8:22 pm

January 20th, 2012, 9:11 am #41

It's basiclly saying the 13th were a bunch of pissheads. LOL.

Dave
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Bryan
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Bryan
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Joined: November 10th, 2010, 3:11 pm

January 20th, 2012, 9:59 am #42

Our fatigue trowsers don't carry the disgraceful marks of drunkeness, at least not often. But they certainly carry the marks of many a morning fryup! What a stupid colour to choose for work clothes. Even with the cooks wearing aprons you can't keep them clean.
Neither Kings nor Queens nor Royal Marines but 28th. Old Bragg's. Brass before and brass behind never feared a foe of any kind.
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Ben Townsend
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Ben Townsend
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Joined: November 19th, 2007, 9:35 pm

January 20th, 2012, 10:45 am #43

Perhaps bacon fat grey would be better, with egg yolk facings? Its better than fouling your regimentals I suppose!
The Standing Orders of the 13th, 1808, do have some instructions on saving the white shirts from excessive wear,
"In Gibralter, and other situations where the Men are expected much to be employed on fatigue parties, they will be permitted to have a check shirt or two, to save their white ones: they must, however be as frequently washed as the white.
Whenever a soldier shall be detected as having in his possession what is known as a false frill, or half-shirt, an article meant for the filthy purpose of hiding dirt, it is immediately to be burnt, and the man confined for disobediance of these orders."

Rifleman LaLa
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Bryan
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Bryan
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Joined: November 10th, 2010, 3:11 pm

January 20th, 2012, 12:15 pm #44

Ben, very interesting stuff! There is a very good description somewhere ( I'm supposed to be working so no access to my books) of a type of heavy linen smock supplied to cooks to cover their clothes. Like a baggy heavy shirt long at the back and front made of Russia Linen. Some were made so that they could be also worn backwards so you could soil both sides before having to wash it.

In my extreme enthusiasm I made up two of those along with the aprons but for some strange reason they still lie in pristine condition in our kitchen linen bag. Can't understand why??
Neither Kings nor Queens nor Royal Marines but 28th. Old Bragg's. Brass before and brass behind never feared a foe of any kind.
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Ben Townsend
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Ben Townsend
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Joined: November 19th, 2007, 9:35 pm

January 20th, 2012, 12:36 pm #45

Much like an agricultural workers smock? I have one for heavy or messy fatigues (wet firewood, that sort of thing), but rarely bring it along because its one more thing to carry- I daresay it might have met the same fate on active service. I believe the Green book specs them for cooks.

"Some were made so that they could be also worn backwards so you could soil both sides before having to wash it. "

I'll let Dave G deal with this comment!

Rifleman LaLa
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Ben Townsend
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Ben Townsend
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February 7th, 2012, 6:12 pm #46

Further to the image in Chartrand's latest from the History of The King's Own. I can confirm that this is not a contemporary drawing. Thanks to Eddie for ruining this for us all, I mean, drawing attention to it! The book has two images, one of undress in 1798 and one from later period, differing slightly in the details. The sourcegiven  is The Regimental Books and various WO papers. I'm looking further into this, but can supply WO numbers if anyone is going to Kew afore my next trip which won't be for a month or two.

Rifleman LaLa
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Eddie
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Eddie
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Joined: September 4th, 2010, 11:49 am

February 9th, 2012, 8:34 pm #47

Ho Ho
It is nice to be appreciated !
Lord save us from "Artists impressions" - the value of primary source material has been proven on this forum many times and long may it continue!
Having said that I still love the Caton Woodville, Hillingford and Simkin prints - and of course Beadle's "The Rearguard" - superb for "atmosphere" - make me shiver just looking at it!
So just to show I am not really so pedantic - here goes - enjoy!



"Far the calling bugles hollo,
High the screaming Fife replies,
Gay the files of scarlet follow:
Woman bore me, I will rise"
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Ben Townsend
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Ben Townsend
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Joined: November 19th, 2007, 9:35 pm

February 10th, 2012, 11:50 am #48

Also fond of Beadle's rearguard :)
Here is Leach on Craufurd (MS letter in his journal, quoted by Verner ii p.129)
"You will have heard how universally General Craufurd was hated and detested in the retreat from Coruna. If possible he is still more abhorred now and has proved himself totally unfit to command a Company much less a Divison."

This was in 1810 after the affair on the Coa. Leach was more circumspect in his memoirs published decades later, after Craufurd was dead of course. An example of the worth of earlier recollections over later ones..

Rifleman LaLa
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khazzard2000
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khazzard2000
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Joined: April 5th, 2007, 6:41 pm

February 10th, 2012, 4:25 pm #49

Don't wish to take this too off topic but...I wonder, the Coa was a damn mess which left the rifles in a very sticky position. We now celebrate their bravery and ability in holding off the French for so long but I'm sure if you're one of the chaps placed in that position you would have a few choice words to say about the man who put you there. But given time, reflection and subsequent experience perhaps you would take a wider, more nuanced view of Crawford's merits over the whole of this time in charge. Though of course, you could say Leach simply doesn't want to bad mouth a dead national hero publically.
History will be kind to me for I intend to write it
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havercakelad
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havercakelad
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Joined: April 20th, 2008, 10:59 pm

July 10th, 2012, 11:53 pm #50

Pvt Thomas Jeremiah, 23rd Foot gives another instance of fatigue jackets being worn on the march.

"We marched about 7 leagues in our white jackets, we bivouacked on an open field by the road until next morning, when at day break a cheerful sight appeared, the whole of the German cavalry were filing off by us on the plains of Waterloo. As soon as they had cleared our front our colonel gave the cheerful word to throw away the white jackets and put on our fighting coats"

From Vol IV: The Waterloo Archive
Ed Gareth Glover.
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